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  • Roy Jamron
    Roy Jamron

    How Much Vitamin D Should Infants Get to Possibly Prevent Celiac Disease?

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Caption: The Endocrine Society 92nd Annual Meeting

    Celiac.com 06/24/2010 - I have previously suggested vitamin D deficiency and the makeup of gut bacteria during pregnancy and infancy, while breast-feeding and prior to and during the introduction of gluten, may be factors leading to the onset of celiac disease. The question of how much vitamin D should be given to infants remains open. The current recommendation, by the American Academy of Pediatrics, is that children of all ages should receive 400 IU of vitamin D each day. A recent limited study of 74 diabetic children, however, suggests that this recommended dose may still be insufficient for most children. The children were given daily vitamin D doses ranging from 400 IU to 2000 IU over a 12-month period and their vitamin D status was monitored. Most of the children remained vitamin D insufficient or deficient at the end of the study. The study concluded that all children younger than 5 years should probably receive at least 1000 IU of vitamin D daily. Further study is needed, especially with specific emphasis on the onset and prevention of celiac disease during infancy.


    Source:
    Medscape Medical News - June 22, 2010: More Evidence That Current Pediatric Vitamin D Recommendation is Often Inadequate
    http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/723993


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    Guest Rufus Greenbaum

    Posted

    Look for the report by Dr Carol Wagner & Dr Bruce Hollis.

    They ran a Class1 Randomised Control Trial where they supplemented pregnant women with 400IU, 4,000 IU and 6,400IU of Vitamin D3 per day.

     

    Pregnacy was easier, birth was easier, babies were bigger and healthier and there were fewer complications

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    There is an alternative view on this. If you look at the epidemiological data and the biochemistry it seems that large doses of oral vitamin D in youth could be involved in inducing celiac disease in later life in some. I have written a journal article on this. Here is the citation:

     

    Exposure to excessive oral vitamin D in youth: a risk

    factor for celiac disease in later life?

    Journal of Allergy and Asthma (Herbert)

    2015. Volume 2, Article 2.

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  • About Me

    Roy S. Jamron holds a B.S. in Physics from the University of Michigan and an M.S. in Engineering Applied Science from the University of California at Davis, and independently investigates the latest research on celiac disease and related disorders.

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