Jump to content
  • Sign Up
Celiac.com Sponsor:


Celiac.com Sponsor:


  • Join Our Community!

    Get help in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Record is Archived

    This article is now archived and is closed to further replies.

    Scott Adams

    How often must a negative test be repeated in suspect individuals? (This question has two aspects: for an individual with existing symptoms, and for a sibling of a known celiac.)**

    Scott Adams


    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Vijay Kumar, M.D., Research Associate Professor at the University of Buffalo and President and Director of IMMCO Diagnostics: If the test is negative and there is a strong suspicion of celiac disease, it must be repeated after several weeks (3-4 weeks), especially after a high gluten intake. We did a study of two cases with DH who were serologically negative. However, a gluten challenge 1g/Kg body wt/day resulted in positive serology; the results became normal on a gluten free diet.

    If you are a relative of a celiac disease patient and are on a regular diet and the serology performed by an experienced laboratory is negative then there may not be any need for retesting until and unless clinically justified.



    Celiac.com Sponsor:




    Karoly Horvath, M.D., Ph.D., Associate Professor of Pediatrics; Director, Peds GI & Nutrition Laboratory; University of Maryland at Baltimore: There is no rule for it. If a family member with previous negative tests experiences any gastrointestinal symptoms associated with celiac disease, he/she should undergo serological testing as soon as possible. It is well known that up to 15% of the family members of a patient with celiac disease may have the asymptomatic (latent or silent) form of celiac disease, although they have positive serological tests and have the pathological changes in the upper part of the small intestine. It is also evident that there are at least three developmental stages of mucosal lesions (Marsh MN. Gastroenterology 1992;102:330-354) and celiac disease may manifest at each period of life. That is why we recommend a repeat test every 2-3 years in first degree relatives of celiac patients.


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There are no comments to display.



    Guest
    This is now closed for further comments

  • About Me

    Celiac.com's Founder and CEO, Scott was diagnosed with celiac disease  in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. Scott launched the site that later became Celiac.com in 1995 "To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives."  In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    There is no typical celiac. Individuals range from having no symptoms (asymptomatic or "latent" forms of the disease) to extreme cases where patients present to their physicians with gas, bloating, diarrhea, and weight loss due to malabsorption.
    In between these two extremes lie a wide variety of symptoms that include:
    Diarrhea Constipation Steatorrhea...

    Scott Adams
    Traditionally, gluten is defined as a cohesive, elastic protein that is left behind after starch is washed away from a wheat flour dough. Only wheat is considered to have true gluten. Gluten is actually made up of many different proteins.
    There are two main groups of proteins in gluten, called the gliadins and the glutenins. Upon digestion, the gluten proteins break down...

    Scott Adams
    The following was posted by Kemp Randolph on the Celiac Listserv news group krand@pipeline.com:
    The difference is that between two immune related reactions, allergy and intolerance. I asked the question of the technical difference between the two some time ago and got no response. Its not based on overt symptoms, thats for sure. Were also not talking about the difference...

  • Celiac.com Sponsor:

  • Forum Discussions

    I agree.  Clarification is needed.  
    That is not a celiac test result.  Celiac results are NOT reported as mg/dL.  It is most likely a total IgA result. Were there any other results?
    @faithjoy Interesting subject. Do you have celiac disease?   https://www.healthline.com/health/pregnancy/cryptic-pregnancy https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=KSNLfuzJQGQ  
×
×
  • Create New...