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    Jefferson Adams

    Increased Levels of Antigliadin Antibodies not Fully Explained by Intestinal Barrier Gene Variants

    Jefferson Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 03/05/2010 - A team of researchers recently studied therelationship between increased levels of antigliadin antibodies andintestinal barrier gene variants.

    The research team included V.M. Wolters, B. Z. Alizadeh, M. E. Weijerman, A. Zhernakova, I. M. vanHoogstraten, M. L. Mearin, M. C. Wapenaar, C.Wijmenga, M. W. Schreurs.They are affiliated with the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology,UMC Utrecht, Utrecht, The Netherlands.



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    Numerous genes may affectintestinal barrier function, including MAGI2, MYO9B, and PARD3, whichhave a close association with celiac disease. Gauging intestinalpermeability is tough to do, so researchers can test indirectly byusing antibodies against gliadin and Baker's yeast (anti-Saccharomycescerevisiae antibodies).

    The goal of the study was to determinewhether intestinal permeability, represented by antibodies againstgliadin, was connected to MAGI2, MYO9B, and PARD3.

    The teamanalyzed patients with Down syndrome, a population with suspectedincreased intestinal permeability. The team examined connectionsbetween AGA and ASCA.

    The team genotyped 126 Down syndromepatients for six single-nucleotide polymorphisms in MAGI2 (rs1496770,rs6962966, rs9640699), MYO9B (rs1457092, rs2305764), and PARD3(rs10763976).

    They then performed an allele dosage associationof these risk genes and AGA levels. They also found a strongcorrelation between AGA and ASCA (p < 0.01).

    Subjects withone or more risk genotypes showed lower average AGA levels (trend testp = 0.007) and made up a larger number of patients with normal AGAlevels (p = 9.3 x 10(-5)).

    Celiac-associated risk genotypesare associated with lower AGA values rather than higher AGA values.This all means that, regarding the increased prevalence of elevated AGAin patients with Down syndrome, there are other immunologic factors atplay. These may involve altered induction and/or maintenance oftolerance.

    Source:
    Hum Immunol. 2010 Feb 3.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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