Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


  • Join Our Community!

    Get help in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Record is Archived

    This article is now archived and is closed to further replies.

    Jefferson Adams

    Intestinal Dysbiosis and Reduced Immunoglobulin-coated Bacteria Associated with Celiac Disease in Children

    Jefferson Adams
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.   eNewsletter: Get our eNewsletter

    Celiac.com 03/19/2010 - Celiac disease is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the gut triggered by an adverse immune response to dietary gluten proteins in genetically susceptible individuals. One of the first ways the body responds to offending proteins in an adverse celiac disease response is by producing mucous via IgA secretion in an effort to neutralize offending antigens and pathogens.

    A team of researchers recently sought to better document the relationships between immunoglobulin-coated bacteria and bacterial composition in feces of celiac disease patients, untreated and treated with a gluten-free diet (GFD) and healthy controls. The research team included Giada De Palma, Inmaculada Nadal, Marcela Medina, Ester Donat, Carmen Ribes-Koninckx, Miguel Calabuig,  and Yolanda Sanz.



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):




    They observed that intestinal dysbiosis and reduced immunoglobulin-coated bacteria are associated with celiac disease in children. Both untreated and treated celiac disease patients showed markedly lower levels of IgA, IgG and IgM-coated fecal bacteria compared to healthy controls.

    Celiac disease patients showed substantially reduced ratio of Gram-positive to Gram-negative bacteria compared to control subjects. Untreated celiac disease patients showed less abundant group proportions (P<0.050) of Bifidobacterium, Clostridium histolyticum, C. lituseburense and Faecalibacterium prausnitzii than did healthy controls.

    Untreated celiac disease patients showed more abundant group proportions (P<0.050) of Bacteroides-Prevotella than in control subjects. Both untreated and treated celiac disease patients showed significantly impoverished (P<0.050) levels of IgA coating the Bacteroides-Prevotella compared with healthy controls.


    From these results, the research team concluded that intestinal dysbiosis plays a role in reduced IgA-coating bacteria in celiac disease patients. This offers a fresh perspective into the possible relationships between the gut microbiota and the host defenses in celiac disease patients.

    Source:

    0

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There are no comments to display.



    Guest
    This is now closed for further comments

  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17):




  • Forum Discussions

    If they are 100% gluten-free it can take anywhere for a few weeks to a few months for their tests to normalize. I would just add that the lower the number are to begin with, the faster it will likely occur, and the higher the numbers,...
    It really depends. Mine were normal after 6 months, some people will still show elevated for a year or more. That's with a strict gluten-free diet.  Early on it's best to judge recovery by seeing if symptoms improve. Labs should still ...
    How long should it take a child diagnosed with celiac disease to have normalized bloodwork numbers on a gluten free diet?