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  • Chris Bekermeier
    Chris Bekermeier

    Is Buckwheat Flour Really Gluten-Free?

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      With so much conflicting information available today, it can be hard to tell what's gluten-free and what isn't. Here's the skinny on buckwheat.


    Celiac.com 10/18/2013 - Buckwheat, sometimes referred to as kasha, is often billed as a “tasty alternative to wheat.” That’s all well and good, but is it really gluten-free, and generally considered safe to eat for those who suffer from celiac disease or a gluten sensitivity?  

    Photo: CC-- Bob DassWhether or not buckwheat is tasty is a matter of opinion. However, with so much conflicting information available today, it can be hard to tell what’s gluten-free and what isn’t. Here’s the skinny on buckwheat.

    The Facts

    Good news! With its non-wheat status, buckwheat is safely gluten-free. Buckwheat and wheat are, come to find out, actually from completely different botanical families. Derived from the seeds of a flowering plant, buckwheat is not considered a grain or a cereal (though it may be called a pseudo-cereal—don’t let that scare you).

    Buckwheat, in all of its gluten-free glory, is actually closely related to rhubarb. In addition, it is an excellent source of fiber and nutrients. In particular, buckwheat groats (the small, triangular seeds), when cooked, offer 17 grams of dietary fiber or 68% of the daily requirement for a 2,000 calorie per day diet, as well as 22 grams of protein.

    Nutritionally beneficial and sometimes used in treating symptoms of type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure, buckwheat contains rutin. Rutin, a glycoside, has been known to strengthen capillary walls and improve circulation.

    Like many grains, buckwheat can sometimes be cross-contaminated with wheat during processing, transportation or if it is used as a rotational crop with wheat, so it is important to find non-cross contaminated source of buckwheat—make sure the one you use is certified gluten-free.

    Culinary Uses

    Buckwheat groats make a healthy side dish. Also, if you grind the small seeds of the buckwheat plant, you can make buckwheat flour for use in noodles, crepes, and many other gluten-free products. Using buckwheat flour in your cooking will give a strong nut taste to your dishes. You can also contribute raw buckwheat groats to recipes for cookies, cakes, granola, crackers, or any other gluten-free, bread-like item.

    If you’re feeling more creative, buckwheat makes a good binding agent, and becomes very gelatinous when soaked. If you soak, rinse, and then re-dry the groats you can produce a sort of buckwheat chip that is crunchy and can act as a nice side dish.

    When toasted, buckwheat becomes kasha. You can pick out kasha—vs. raw buckwheat—by the color; it’s a darker reddish-brown. In addition, kasha has a strong toasted-nut scent. Conversely, raw buckwheat groats are typically light brown or green and have no aroma.

    Buckwheat

    So, there you have it. You can use buckwheat and kasha safely as a nutritional, gluten-free alternative to wheat, or to create fun and tasty side dishes with buckwheat groats.

    If you’re looking to stock your pantry with all kinds of gluten-free wheat alternatives for your side dishes or even your main dishes, you can safely go for buckwheat in addition to cornmeal, millet, amaranth, cornstarch, garbanzo beans, arrowroot, quinoa or brown rice. Eating a gluten-free diet doesn’t mean you have to rely on the same old wheat alternative for every dish!


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    Thank you for the thought!! I love tabouli and am recently wheat free- loving it but thinking what to substitute in tabouli...I was thinking millet. I like the Kasha idea.

    Quinoa is also a great tabouli base.

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    We have a small commercial, certified organic flour mill that only produces buckwheat flour...absolutely 100% gluten free. I grow the buckwheat and guarantee it to be free of contamination of other grains with gluten, such as wheat to my buyers. It takes a lot of work to keep product gluten free, but I have developed a regiment to achieve it.

    This article could have stated the benefit of the great amino acid make up of buckwheat, making it a very good source of plant protein for humans.

    I would be very interested to buy your flour - do you ship to Switzerland?

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    We have a small commercial, certified organic flour mill that only produces buckwheat flour...absolutely 100% gluten free. I grow the buckwheat and guarantee it to be free of contamination of other grains with gluten, such as wheat to my buyers. It takes a lot of work to keep product gluten free, but I have developed a regiment to achieve it.

    This article could have stated the benefit of the great amino acid make up of buckwheat, making it a very good source of plant protein for humans.

    In NJ where can I buy this?

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    Thank you for the interesting and detailed article. I used some buckwheat flour for making tortillas months ago and used it again last night. Then I was worried I wasn't sure if it was gluten free. Glad to know.

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    Thank you for the thought!! I love tabouli and am recently wheat free- loving it but thinking what to substitute in tabouli...I was thinking millet. I like the Kasha idea.

    I have used quinoa very successfully in tabouli!

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    We have a small commercial, certified organic flour mill that only produces buckwheat flour...absolutely 100% gluten free. I grow the buckwheat and guarantee it to be free of contamination of other grains with gluten, such as wheat to my buyers. It takes a lot of work to keep product gluten free, but I have developed a regiment to achieve it.

    This article could have stated the benefit of the great amino acid make up of buckwheat, making it a very good source of plant protein for humans.

    I live in Alberta Canada Bruce, where can I purchase the flour?

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    Good info; buckwheat doesn't contain gluten, but may be cross-contaminated. That's exactly what I was trying to find out. I appreciate when I can find quick and easy answers without having to read pages of sidebar info. Thank you!

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    Currently listening to Dr. Peter Osborne. He says there are hundreds of forms of gluten being discovered - some in corn, which can cause a celiac reaction. There are no tests available for these.

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    Currently listening to Dr. Peter Osborne. He says there are hundreds of forms of gluten being discovered - some in corn, which can cause a celiac reaction. There are no tests available for these.

    Corn gluten is safe for celiacs.

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    I am interested to find out what brand of gluten free buckwheat flour is not contaminated, so that I can make my own noodles. You don't state any brands as safe in this article, but leave it up to us to guess.

    Article is very informative and helpful.

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  • About Me

    Chris Bekermeier is Vice President, Sales & Marketing, for PacMoore, one of the leading commercial food packaging companies processing dry ingredients for the food and pharmaceutical industries. Headquartered in Hammond, Indiana, Pacmore's capabilities include blending, spray drying, re-packaging, sifting, and consumer packaging. His company's site is at: http://www.pacmoore.com/packaging

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