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    Is Mango Flour the Next Hot Gluten-free Alternative?

    Jefferson Adams


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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.   eNewsletter: Get our eNewsletter

    Caption: Is flour from mangoes the next hot gluten-free trend? Photo: CC--S. Alexis

    Celiac.com 11/01/2016 - Is flour made from mangoes the hot new gluten-free alternative to wheat flour?

    A Filipino pastry chain is hoping to woo health-conscious consumers with their gluten-free flour made from mangoes. You heard right. Flour from mangoes.



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    Philippine-based bread and pastry chain, Magic Melt Foods Inc., is introducing a gluten-free product line they hope will appeal to people with celiac disease, and with growing numbers of nutritious-minded consumers.

    Magic Melt's "healthilicious" mango flour is milled from mango peel and mango seeds, instead of wheat.

    Based in Cebu, Philippines, Green Enviro Management Systems Inc., manufactures and holds the patent for mango flour. The company's product as gained attention from far and wide, and recently drew a visit from government officials of Johannesberg in South Africa, who sent workers to learn the process.

    Like many gluten-free flours, mango flour lack the stickiness common to gluten flours. To work around that, the company turned to egg whites and other "healthy" alternatives. The resulting mango flour is suitable for some muffins, bread, energy bars, and sandwiches.

    So, will mango flour be making an appearance in gluten-free products at your store? Stay tuned for more developments on this and other gluten-free stories.

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    Ah, but mangoes are another very dangerous allergen. The skin, which is being used in this flour, contains urushiol. Most people are familiar with this as it is the part of the poison ivy plant which causes, itching, rashes, blisters, etc. The fruit, or pulp, of a mango is usually ok to eat, even for those sensitive to poison ivy. The skin - not so much.

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    I would be interested in the calorie and carb content of the mango flour. Does anyone have a link? I am a gluten free, diabetic, vegetarian. (My friends call me an air plant)

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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