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  • Scott Adams

    Is Modified Food Starch Gluten-Free and Safe for Celiacs?

    Scott Adams
    6 6
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      In the U.S. all modified food starch not made with wheat, and labeled as such, is gluten-free.


    Image: CC PDM 1.0--Midnight Believer
    Caption: Image: CC PDM 1.0--Midnight Believer

    Celiac.com 07/31/2020 - In the U.S., nearly all modified food starch is gluten-free and safe for people with celiac disease. Modified food starch (except for that labeled as made with wheat) is on Celiac.com's list of Safe Gluten-Free Ingredients. Modified food starch is made by treating starch with enzymes, chemicals, or processing techniques to change the structure, and make it useful as an emulsifier, thickener, or an anti-caking agent in food manufacturing.

    Modified Food Starch can go by many names, including:

    • Modified Food Starch
    • Modified Starch
    • Food Starch
    • Food Starch Modified
    • Starch



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    In the U.S., most modified food starch is generally made from corn, potato, tapioca, or waxy maize. By federal law, the single word "starch" as an ingredient means cornstarch. In the U.S. all modified food starch not made with wheat, and labeled as such, is gluten-free.

    Wheat is sometimes used to make modified food starch. By law, if wheat is used as the source, it must be declared on the label as "modified wheat starch" or "modified food starch (wheat)." Any food starch labeled as wheat starch is not gluten-free, and unsafe for people with celiac disease. This is why it's important to read the allergen label.

    So, in the U.S., products labeled modified food starch, modified starch, food starch, food starch modified, and starch are all gluten-free and safe for people with celiac disease. Anything made with wheat must be labeled and is not-gluten-free and unsafe for celiacs.


     

    Edited by Scott Adams

    6 6

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    5 minutes ago, psawyer said:

    Very, very few Campbells soups are gluten-free, and it isn't the modified starch. Many contain noodles. Others contain barley. Tomato has wheat flour.

    That's my take as well. But it's been awhile since I perused the soup shelves in the grocery store. Maybe the soup companies have gotten away from using wheat as a thickener in offerings that don't have noodles or barley as a main ingredient. Allan, you would still do well to check the labels.

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    No way, I would consume Campbell’s!  While it might not contain wheat, it might not be gluten free.  They are most likely made on a shared line.  Best to see of Campbell’s has a gluten free list on their website.    If you want canned soup, try the clearly marked gluten free Progressive soups.  Those are in my pantry for the next earthquake!  

    Edited by cyclinglady

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    Yes, Progressive offers more gluten-free soup products than does Campbells (if any) and they are stated on the label to be so. A safer alternative but if I remember correctly, a more expensive one. On the other hand, it seems Progressive puts more solid ingredients in their soups whereas Campbells uses more water.

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    Once again I ask the same question... 

    I shop in Asian markets frequently, because of their proximity and their propensity of have flavorful products. Does the rule for disclosure of ingredient sources apply to all products SOLD in the US... or merely manufactured here? 

    WHY IS THIS CAREFUL DISTINCTION NOT EVER ADDRESSED? 

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    3 hours ago, sc'Que? said:

    Once again I ask the same question... 

    I shop in Asian markets frequently, because of their proximity and their propensity of have flavorful products. Does the rule for disclosure of ingredient sources apply to all products SOLD in the US... or merely manufactured here? 

    WHY IS THIS CAREFUL DISTINCTION NOT EVER ADDRESSED? 

    Any food sold in the US must comply with FDA regulations. If a starch is derived from wheat in food it must be labeled.

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    But would that apply to online purchases? And can you trust the labels on food items that originate in other countries whose analysis and reporting standards are not as subject to scrutiny and verification as they would be in the U.S., Canada or Europe?

    Edited by trents

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    Guest KERRI KISKO

    Posted

    19 hours ago, Guest Allan said:

    So are Campbell soups made with 'modified food starch' gluten free?

    Thanks,

    Allan;  adsmithoo7@hotmail.com

    Hi Allan,

    The only US made Campbell’s soups I have found are the Sipping Soups. The Sipping Soups don’t need a thickener so the wheat flour is omitted. So feel free to enjoy the Sipping Soups, even tomato.

    In Canada, most Campbell’s soups (without noodles or barley, etc) are made with corn starch as the thickener and are safe to eat. Always read the Allergen part to see if wheat is listed.

    Kerri

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  • About Me

    Scott Adams was diagnosed with celiac disease in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. In 1995 he launched the site that later became Celiac.com to help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives.  He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of the (formerly paper) newsletter Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. Celiac.com does not sell any products, and is 100% advertiser supported.


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