• Join our community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsSubscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

  • Member Statistics

    71,986
    Total Members
    3,093
    Most Online
    Kris79
    Newest Member
    Kris79
    Joined
  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/07/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
  • 0

    SHOULD YOU PUT YOUR CHILD ON A GLUTEN-FREE DIET?


    Dr. Vikki Petersen D.C, C.C.N


    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2012 Issue


    Celiac.com 09/22/2017 - I run into many parents who are in quite a quandary about instituting a gluten-free diet for their child. A typical scenario is that one of the parents is gluten intolerant and is highly suspicious that their child is as well. Due to the child being 'relatively healthy' the non-gluten intolerant spouse suggests that the child be able to 'live a little' and enjoy the cake and pizza that is so prevalent during children's parties and sporting events.


    Ads by Google:




    ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW ADS
    Ads by Google:



    In my opinion, there is no question about whether a gluten-free diet should be implemented, after confirmation that gluten intolerance exists that is. I know that gluten intolerance vastly increases your risk of developing diseases that can affect almost any system and/or organ in the human body. The evidence shows that it vastly increases your risk for autoimmune disease. I also know that it can be rather silent in a younger body, but if a positive test exists, then it IS doing damage, regardless of whether it is felt or not.

    To add a little more strength to my argument is the result of a recent study published by the Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics wherein researchers aimed to evaluate the influence of celiac disease on the social aspects of life in those living in the U.S.

    Not surprisingly celiac disease did have a negative impact on the quality of life in social settings, specifically in the area of travel and dining out. However, and this is where I find that most people make their mistake with their children, the researchers found that 'those diagnosed in childhood and maintained on the diet experienced a reduced impact on their quality of life as an adult'.

    So it turns out that you aren't doing any favors to your at-risk child by putting off the implementation of a gluten-free diet. You're not only creating negative impacts health-wise, as mentioned above, but by delaying a gluten-free diet you are also condemning them to the perception of a lower quality of life.

    If you think about it, if gluten-free is pretty much all you've ever known, you would be less likely to miss it. You haven't built up the memories of gluten-containing cakes and pizzas and pancakes.

    Please do not put off testing your child because you think you're doing him or her a favor by putting it off. The truth is quite the contrary. Waiting could allow an autoimmune or other illness to develop that could have been avoided. There is absolutely NO benefit to one's health to continue eating gluten when one is gluten intolerant, and it turns out that there is no benefit psychologically either.

    Have you run into this argument from friends or family? Have you put off diagnosing a child because you were made to feel guilty? Please write to me and let me know your experiences and thoughts.

    To your good health.

     

    Reference:

    • Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics. 2012 Feb 25. Living with coeliac disease: survey results from the USA. Volume 25, Issue 3, pages 233–238, June 2012

    Image Caption: Image: CC--Jay
    0


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    Guest AWOL cast iron stomach

    Posted

    I am a 4th decade of life diagnosis and my earliest symptoms besides constipation was IC bladder issues present age 5. I remember begging my mom to take me to the doctor , nothing showed up, I cried as the symptoms continued. I truly didn't know what it was, but I knew something was wrong. It was a maddening bladder spasm that would not go away, my bladder was empty, and I could not stop the discomfort. My mom I know then believed me, but it showed nothing on tests what was it? I remember the mixture of concern and perplex on her face she very rarely shows in life. In time I learned to stop complaining, sit certain ways to create pressure that would reduce the spasm and discomfort. I learned to use the bathroom often to ensure my bladder was empty and would mind over matter the incessant spasm symptoms best I could. Since there was no explanation it was inferred I was an anxious child who was anxious about using the rest room. Fast forward more decades more symptoms piled on (including GI through accumulating into ones that would send me to Dr. & Hospital. I was diagnosed IBS in my early 20s. My husband was the first person to suggest bread was bad for me not a Dr., as for myself well you're told it's just you as a child and the programming self plays a lifetime so my self talk said the same. As my health declined I had testing in my 40s, awaiting my scope appointment months away,I did ask my children's Dr for a blood test celiac panel for each . She said no since I had not been diagnosed officially. Following my incomplete challenge (yes I went gluten-free once to see if it would help and it did I did not want to challenge). A bad error at a restaurant had me back at a Dr for official testing as arthritis now joined the club of my many celiac symptoms. We had to remove gluten from the home entirely now due to my very bad symptoms with cc after my challenge. When that was done my kids became gluten light my son quickly manifested my early symptoms when he had gluten, corn, and milk. My son knew, my husband the empirist, pointed out the news to me. Free of the offenders my son felt better, his skin, GI, and bladder improved. He had seen his mom attempt the gluten challenge and said no mom I don't want to do that when I offered to take him to a different Dr. He said mom why would I eat something that makes me sick to find damage? We know we what it is , I eat like you now. I do regret not knowing sooner for myself or my son. So many missed opportunities. He is 10 so I have read he has a higher prevalence of AI issues approximately 20 percent or so. He does very well with the diet and surprisingly has a discipline I would not expect a boy his age to have. I do wish I had known sooner for he and myself. I do worry about our daughter who says no I have no problems mom. We are entirely gluten-free free house and she knows my concerns for her should she find consuming gluten outside our home becomes a problem. My husband as the non gluten intolerant parent is completely supportive of the issue and does not force my son to have a regular diet. He feels our daughter is much better off being limited to a Whole Foods diet and not a typical SAD one. I'll never know what life would be like if diagnosed earlier nor do I know what awaits me on this journey having gone so long eating gluten. I have concerns that testing is below where it should be from technology and screening for the population and especially youth, but more parents seem aware about food allergies then decades before. I don't think celiac knowledge and awareness is where it should be yet. The SAD diet prevails, but more schools are supporting the Whole Foods treats and none or limited vending machines. Public health and time will show if this is larger than 1 percent and if not better and earlier screening at the minimum will come on the scene. I do hope children with this problem are detected earlier than myself and my son.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Why everyone keeps saying that gluten-free diet is bad? Do you want just to keep in trend with others? Are you sure modern Gluten is good? Are you sure limiting Gluten in food is bad and will not prevent (delay) Celiac? Obviously you don't know. So just explain how to replace Gluten in our diet. If you want to help people, explain them that only missing thing with gluten-free are polysaccharides. Without them human microbiota becomes poor. So explain others where to get polysaccharides from food (for example chicory). That article would have some value. And please don't start about FOMAP's. That stuff people will get enough.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoticons maximum are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Popular Contributors

  • Ads by Google:

  • Who's Online   12 Members, 0 Anonymous, 1,176 Guests (See full list)

  • Related Articles

    Yvonne Vissing Ph.D.
    Celiac.com 05/03/2016 - How do you know when your child has gluten sensitivity, gluten intolerance, or celiac disease? If gluten issues run in your family and you know there is a predisposition to having problems with gluten in foods, then you may be alert to signs that it has been passed on to your child. But if you and your biological family members never had problems with it, then you're not expecting gluten to be an issue. Children arrive with a complicated genetic past that we may not always have the details about. We may not know the health history of the families of our child's other parent, or even sometimes our own. We may not know if anyone had reactions to gluten. Because celiac and gluten sensitivities can appear as chameleons, genes for it may be masked as other health issues. Parents may be a carrier and have no identifiable symptoms at all. People may have celiac disease without ever knowing it.
    It's complicated to raise a child. When they don't feel well, it's hard to figure out when their health problems are physical, emotional, social, or psychosomatic. When it comes to kids, having a belly ache is a common occurrence. So are a variety of symptoms that are linked to celiac disease or gluten intolerance or sensitivity, like headaches, fatigue, skin issues, depression, or GI track problems. When are signs pointing at the normal wear-and-tear of growing up—and when they are related to a syndrome like celiac disease? It takes a significant period of observation to figure this out.
    Celiac disease is regarded to be an immune-mediated enteropathy caused by a permanent sensitivity to gluten in genetically susceptible individuals. The North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) found that the prevalence of celiac disease in children between age two-and-a-half and age fifteen ranges from 1 in 80 to 1 in 300 children. This means that in a pediatric practice of 1,500 children there are probably between 5 and 20 children with diagnosed or undiagnosed celiac disease—and potentially a lot more if one adds in gluten intolerance or sensitivities. According to the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness, celiac disease is genetically based, so reactions to gluten are more commonly found in those who have a family history of this autoimmune condition. They collaborated on a multi-phase research project with people diagnosed with celiac disease and at-risk family members who remained untested. Celiac disease was found in 5 to 10 percent of the family members of persons who had been diagnosed with celiac disease. But people may have reactions to gluten yet not have celiac disease. Some may have gluten intolerance or be sensitive to it without being diagnosed with celiac disease, so the actual relationship of health problems potentially associated with gluten may be considerably higher. First and second-degree relatives have more of a risk of developing celiac disease than are more distant relatives. For instance, their research found that celiac disease can occur in about 1 in 22 among children and their parents or siblings. But in analyzing the child's relationship to aunts, uncles, nephews, nieces, cousins, grandparents, half-siblings who may have celiac, the number decreases to 1 in 39. Detailed results of their research can be found from the NFCA's Seriously, Celiac Disease campaign.
    In our family, Chris never knew he was predisposed to celiac disease until he hit his twenties. Celiac is sneaky—while it can occur within people at any age, sometimes it doesn't show up until people get a bit older. As a child, he grew up on sandwiches, cookies, macaroni and cheese, and Grandma's home-made bread. When he had a tummy upset, as good mom I'd bring him chicken noodle soup and saltines. I never knew about celiac disease. My family came from a long line of gluten aficionados. As he hit adolescence and his teen years, signs of gluten intolerance emerged, only we didn't know that's what they were. Few parents link together migraines, skin problems with belly upsets and food "allergies." Chris's doctor dismissed his symptoms as independent, routine growing-up conditions without putting all the pieces of the puzzle together to realize that they were actually all a part of a larger celiac syndrome. It was only when he took a road trip and visited his father's sister and his cousins that he learned about the family's predisposition to celiac. His grandma always had stomach problems, I recall. She lived at a time and place where regular folks living in small towns were simply unaware of conditions such as celiac. As the old saw goes, you can't know what you don't know. In hindsight, she clearly had gluten issues. The gene seems to have been latent in her children, but passed on to take more active forms into the next generation of Chris and his cousin. It's confusing, because one child in the family can have a severe case of celiac while a full-blood sibling may have no sign of it at all! If he hadn't taken that road trip and stopped to visit his aunt, he may never have known that he had celiac. Upon that realization, suddenly everything made sense. All of his erratic symptoms were actually a picture-perfect portrayal of someone with celiac disease!
    We learned a bit about the disease, went to the store looking for gluten-free foods and quickly began modifying his diet. Since his MD couldn't figure out what was making him feel so bad, and if cutting out gluten could make him feel better, we decided that was a course worth pursuing. He felt better immediately. He has never been officially tested for celiac disease, although that would probably have been a better course of action. At that point in time, we simply didn't know about the testing options.
    Testing options have improved significantly over the last decade. The diagnosis of celiac disease can be done with a biopsy of the small intestine mucosa. Blood or serological tests are also helpful but less definitive. The University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center finds that the serum anti-tissue transglutaminase (tTG-IgA) is a widely used antibody blood test for screening for celiac disease, as is a total serum IgA test. The total serum test bolsters the reliability of the tTG test. A newer version of an old anti-gliadin antibody test has been developed called DPG or deamidated gliadin peptides test. Tissue transglutaminase (TTG) measures, endomysial antibody (IgA antibody to endomysium EMA) are recommended by many experts, while formerly used antigliadin antibody tests (AGA) are not as widely used.
    About 95% of people with celiac disease have the HLA-DQ2 gene and most of the remaining 5% have the HLA-DQ8 gene. Genetic testing can determine if someone has one or both of these genes. If someone has the gene it means they are at risk of developing celiac disease, but it does not mean that you necessarily have it. A positive genetic test should be followed up with a celiac blood panel to determine if someone has celiac disease. Celiac disease experts recommend family member testing as a proactive approach to diagnosis and then follow up with tests every 2-3 years or if potential symptoms start to emerge. They note that it is possible for someone to initially have a negative test result, but then test positive years later. This is worthwhile to know when trying to figure out if a child has celiac disease or not. It also means that re-testing may be a necessary process, since both the child's body and the disease propensity may change over time.
    What are warning signs that a child may have celiac disease? According to the North American Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition and other celiac experts, there are both gastrointestinal and other symptoms to look for—symptoms that one may not logically associate with gluten. But remember that many of these symptoms may exist independently in children and have no relationship to having celiac disease at all! This is what makes trying to figure out whether or not a child has it extremely challenging.
    Once a determination is made that a child has celiac disease or is highly predisposed to be gluten intolerant or sensitive, changing the child's exposure to gluten in foods becomes of utmost importance. The problem is, most people aren't aware of gluten issues in general, and they particularly aren't thinking of it occurring in children. As Kay Chick (2014) describes in her article, there are many things that parents and teachers can do to proactively prevent problems in routine situations. She points out that many school cafeterias aren't equipped to safely serve children who have to go gluten-free. Most parents don't realize that making accommodations for children with celiac disease are assured under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act; seventy-four percent of parents who participated in her study reported their children did not have a 504 plan or written into an Individualized Education Program (IEP) to help everyone make accommodations for their celiac disease. Children with celiac may also be eligible for services under the Individuals Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) if it has an impact on their ability to learn.
    Social events like birthday parties, camps, and field trips may expose children to gluten in foods and provide no alternatives for those who can't eat them. Sharing food is a common childhood occurrence, but an experience that leaves celiac kids out unless they are sure the food is safe. Going to another child's house to play or for a sleep-over may be an extra-big deal for a celiac kid. When the team goes out for a pizza party or ice cream cones after a game, the child with celiac has to be extremely careful. It helps enormously when adults and people in supervisory roles understand that when children need to avoid gluten, it is not because it is a choice—it is a health necessity. While a public awareness campaign to help people understand that there are children (and adults) who have to avoid gluten is underway, there's still a long way to go. Children need to learn self-advocacy skills to keep themselves healthy. This is sometimes hard to do when interacting with parents, teachers, and other adults who think that they understand the complications associated with needing to be gluten-free—and they actually don't.
    Going gluten-free doesn't have to be hard, but when it comes to children and youth, often it is. From identifying that celiac disease could be a problem, to diagnosing it, to addressing it in one's daily lifestyle, children are a special interest population. In order to help celiac children to live long and healthy lives, it begins with educating adults, most of whom will never have to personally go gluten-free. Speaking out on behalf of a celiac kid is an important thing to do. Adults in all professions need to learn what celiac is and how to institute celiac-safe strategies into their organizations. Even if they aren't affected, adults need to realize how their decisions and behavior may adversely impact children.
    Our youngest citizens count on adults to always be looking out for their best interests. Speak with your local schools, recreation groups, and youth-oriented civic organizations to make sure the leaders understand that the chances are high that they are serving children with celiac disease. Help them to understand that they should learn more about what it is, that they should make sure eating arrangements always take into consideration children with special dietary needs, and have food alternatives readily available. Every parent would expect the same concern and attentive care if their child had celiac. And as a community, aren't all children "our" children?
    For more information, see our book, Going Gluten Free (Norlights Press 2015). Yvonne Vissing has been appointed by the United Nations to be a Policy Chair for Child Rights, under the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child.
    Resources:
    Chick, Kay. The Educational, Social, and Family Challenges of Children with Celiac Disease: What Parents Should Know. 3/19/2014. Celiac.com Children's Digestive Health and Nutrition Foundation (CDHNF). www.cdhnf.org Diagnosis and Treatment of Celiac Disease in Children. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition. 2005; Volume 40, Number 1 (Jan): 1-19. National Foundation for Celiac Awareness. http://www.celiaccentral.org/ North American Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) http://www.naspghan.org//files/documents/pdfs/medical-resources/celiac/CeliacGuidelineSummary.pdf Raising Our Celiac Kids (ROCK). https://www.celiac.com/articles/563/1/ROCK-Raising-Our- celiac-Kids---National- celiac-Disease-Support-Group/Page1.html University of Maryland School of Medicine Center for Celiac Research http://glutendude.com/celiac/celiac-disease-symptoms/

    Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.
    Celiac.com 07/19/2016 - We know that celiac disease afflicts almost 1% of the general population (1). We also know that about 12% of the general population has non-celiac gluten sensitivity, as indicated by elevated IgG class anti-gliadin antibodies in their blood (2). Although elevated antibodies identified by this test are often dismissed as "non-specific", they are clear evidence that the immune system is mounting a reaction against the most common food in our western diet. It is also true that many people who produce these antibodies and have then excluded gluten from their diets have also experienced improved health. Unfortunately, most of the individuals who have elevated IgG anti-gliadin antibodies and might benefit from avoiding gluten do not know that they are gluten sensitive and/or have celiac disease. Thus, we really don't know how many, or which, school children should be avoiding gluten to optimize their academic potential as they work their way through the education system.
    Approaching this issue from a different angle, we know that between 10% and 15% of the U.S. population has dyslexia (3). About 60% of those with ADHD have dyslexia (3). If we calculate the prevalence of ADHD, at 8.8% of the population (4), then just the ADHD component, it should give us 5.28% of the population with dyslexia. But we can't tell how much overlap there is between this group and the group that constitutes between 10% and 15% of the population that are reported as having dyslexia. These disabilities have been given considerable attention and have been studied for some time, yet we really know little about their causes, except in cases of traumatic brain injury.
    However, there is a startling study, reported in The Times ten years ago, from the Nunnykirk School in Northumberland, U.K. (5). The astounding results of this study continue to cry out for further research and possible replication. After 6 months on a gluten-free diet, testing showed that 11 of the 12 (92%) live-in students had improved their reading and comprehension at more than twice the rate at which regular students are expected to improve. Among the 22 students living in the community and attending this special school for dyslexic students during the day, 17 of them (77%) showed similar improvements (5). To put these results in perspective, special needs teachers are often very proud when they can help students achieve at rates similar to regular students. Doubling the rates of improvement is an astonishingly positive result! And a few of these students leaped ahead at six times the rate of normal students! The numbers of students involved in this study are too small to allow us to extrapolate to other dyslexic populations. And, given that the research was done in the United Kingdom, where definitions of learning disabilities, and other factors may be dissimilar, and that the work was reported in a newspaper instead of a peer reviewed journal, and the startlingly positive nature of these results, we really need further, carefully designed studies to explore this phenomenon.
    The Nunnykirk findings are consistent with the extensive brain and neurological research that has been done at the Royal Hallamshire Hospital at the University of Sheffield, over the last two decades, by Marios Hadjivassiliou and his colleagues. They have found that a strict gluten-free diet can often relieve central and peripheral neurological symptoms.
    Further, many prominent researchers who work with children and adults who have dyslexia characterize it as a neurobiological condition, and can demonstrate, with MRI, altered brain function in dyslexia (8). It is also clear that many cases of dyslexia are at least partly genetically conferred (8, 9). Neither are learning disabilities limited to dyslexia. Although some practitioners lump two or more learning disabilities together, the literature distinguishes between dyslexia, dysgraphia, dyspraxia, dyscalculia, dysphasia/aphasia, auditory processing disorders, visual processing disorders, etc. Some such practitioners not only differentiate between types of learning disabilities, they also differentiate between sub-types of disabilities. For instance, motor dysgraphia (where fine motor speed is impaired), dyslexic dysgraphia (where normal fine motor speed allows them to draw or copy but impairs spontaneous writing) and spatial dysgraphia (where handwriting is illegible due to distortion) can each be identified based on symptoms (10). Similar sub-types are seen in other learning disabilities.
    But what if the findings at Nunnykirk School are broadly applicable to all of these types of learning problems? Or perhaps further research can tell us which types and sub-types of learning disabilities can often be alleviated by a gluten-free diet.
    My own professional observations suggest that the number of students helped by a gluten-free diet would be similar to the proportions seen at Nunnykirk School. I have also observed that as the strictness of the diet increases, so does the number of students who improve. However, the diagnosing professionals are becoming reluctant to differentiate, even between general types of learning disabilities such as dyslexia and dysgraphia. As teachers, we were told that a child had learning disabilities and then, if not specified in the documents we were given, we had to figure out exactly what type of disability they had, then devise or research effective ways of teaching these students. I have done a little of both, but my experience is that this choice varies from one teacher to the next, and one situation to the next. Unfortunately, depending on the individual teacher's workload, teaching background, and personal biases, these children can sometimes be neglected or under-served, a choice that is often dictated by excessive workloads and demands on teachers' time to perform other tasks, especially extensive reporting and supervising sports and other extra-curricular activities.
    Please recall the overlap between dyslexia and ADHD mentioned earlier (3), and consider that there are ten reports of connections between attention deficit disorders and celiac disease published in the peer reviewed medical literature. Now, please recall that about 60% of these ADHD children will have dyslexia (3). Since the current, and past issues, of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, require that ADHD and learning disorders each be differentiated from any medical condition that might be causing the same symptoms and be alleviated by resolution of the medical condition in question. On that basis alone, almost every child being considered for a diagnosis of learning disorders or ADHD should be thoroughly tested for celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.
    Yet, I would be very surprised to learn that this is commonly being done. Thus, we have a situation in which we are forced to rely upon a study conducted by a group of teachers, in cooperation with parents and students, that was published in The Times (5) and we must take action on our own because, as yet, celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity are not yet being differentiated from ADHD and/or learning disabilities. The really tragic part of this story is that a gluten-free diet, if started early enough, can reduce or completely eliminate all of these problems with learning disabilities and attention deficits, when gluten is the underlying problem.
    If you or your spouse are gluten sensitive, or have celiac disease, do you also have children who struggle in school? Based on the data from Nunnykirk School, current blood tests are probably not sufficient to rule out those who would benefit from a gluten-free diet. For the moment, you may need to institute a trial of a gluten-free diet, as mentioned above, while we await further research in this area. But wouldn't it be valuable for succeeding generations to know, or have a pretty clear idea whether the diet could help? And with what types and/or sub-types of learning disorders? That's where more research could really help. We already know that there is an association between gluten sensitivity and seizure disorders, ataxia and cerebellar degeneration, neuropathy (damage to peripheral nervous system), schizophrenia, depression, migraine, anxiety disorders, autism, multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis (an autoimmune neuromuscular disease), and white matter lesions in the brain (11). It should not be surprising if gluten underlies many or most cases of learning disorders and attention deficits. And if research can tell us which cases would be most likely to benefit from the diet, that will be a huge step forward for parents, students, teachers, and government agencies that provide funding for the education of those who are afflicted with these ailments.
    In the meantime, we only have the information that we have. So, despite its many weaknesses, the Nunnykirk investigation of dyslexic children argues for experimental implementation, on a trial basis. I would suggest at least a six-months-long period of strict gluten avoidance to determine whether it will help individuals who suffer from dyslexia and/or other learning disabilities.
    Sources:
    1. Fasano A, Berti I, Gerarduzzi T, Not T, Colletti RB, Drago S, Elitsur Y, Green PH, Guandalini S, Hill ID, Pietzak M, Ventura A, Thorpe M, Kryszak D, Fornaroli F, Wasserman SS, Murray JA, Horvath K. Prevalence of celiac disease in at-risk and not-at-risk groups in the United States: a large multicenter study. Arch Intern Med. 2003 Feb 10;163(3):286-92.
    2. Hadjivassiliou M, Grünewald R A, Davies-Jones G A B. Gluten sensitivity as a neurological illness. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2002;72:560-563.
    3. Dyslexia Research Institute http://www.dyslexia-add.org/
    4. National Resource Center on ADHD http://www.help4adhd.org/about/statistics
    5. Blair http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/news/uk/article1924736.ece
    6. Hadjivassiliou M, Gibson A, Davies-Jones GA, Lobo AJ, Stephenson TJ, Milford-Ward A. Does cryptic gluten sensitivity play a part in neurological illness? Lancet. 1996 Feb 10;347(8998):369-71.
    7. Aziz I, Hadjivassiliou M. Coeliac disease: noncoeliac gluten sensitivity--food for thought. Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2014 Jul;11(7):398-9.
    8. Shaywitz SE, Shaywitz BA. The Neurobiology of Reading and Dyslexia. Focus on Basics - Connecting Research & Practice, Volume 5,A: Aug. 2001. http://www.ncsall.net/index.html@id=278.html
    9. Eicher JD, Powers NR, Miller LL, Mueller KL, Mascheretti S, Marino C, Willcutt EG, DeFries JC, Olson RK, Smith SD, Pennington BF, Tomblin JB, Ring SM, Gruen JR. Characterization of the DYX2 locus on chromosome 6p22 with reading disability, language impairment, and IQ. Hum Genet. 2014 Jul;133(7):869-81.
    10. About Education http://specialed.about.com/od/readingliteracy/a/Dyslexia-And-Dysgraphia.htm
    11. Jackson JR, Eaton WW, Cascella NG, Fasano A, Kelly DL.Neurologic and psychiatric manifestations of celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. Psychiatr Q. 2012 Mar;83(1):91-102.
    12. Diaconu G, Burlea M, Grigore I, Anton DT, Trandafir LM. Celiac disease with neurologic manifestations in children. Rev Med Chir Soc Med Nat Iasi. 2013 Jan-Mar;117(1):88-94. PubMed PMID: 24505898.
    13. Niederhofer H. Association of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and celiac disease: a brief report. Prim Care Companion CNS Disord. 2011;13(3). pii: PCC.10br01104PMCID: PMC3184556.
    14. Niederhofer H, Pittschieler K. A preliminary investigation of ADHD symptoms in persons with celiac disease. J Atten Disord. 2006 Nov;10(2):200-4.
    15. Zelnik N, Pacht A, Obeid R, Lerner A. Range of neurologic disorders in patients with celiac disease. Pediatrics. 2004 Jun;113(6):1672-6.
    16. Kozłowska ZE. [Evaluation of mental status of children with malabsorption syndrome after long-term treatment with gluten-free diet (preliminary report)]. Psychiatr Pol. 1991 Mar-Apr;25(2):130-4. Polish.
    17. Diaconu G, Burlea M, Grigore I, Anton DT, Trandafir LM. Celiac disease with neurologic manifestations in children. Rev Med Chir Soc Med Nat Iasi. 2013 Jan-Mar;117(1):88-94. PubMed PMID: 24505898.
    18. Niederhofer H. Association of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and celiac disease: a brief report. Prim Care Companion CNS Disord. 2011;13(3). pii: PCC.10br01104. PMCID: PMC3184556.
    19. Niederhofer H, Pittschieler K. A preliminary investigation of ADHD symptoms in persons with celiac disease. J Atten Disord. 2006 Nov;10(2):200-4.
    20. 4: Zelnik N, Pacht A, Obeid R, Lerner A. Range of neurologic disorders in patients with celiac disease. Pediatrics. 2004 Jun;113(6):1672-6.
    21. Kozłowska ZE. [Evaluation of mental status of children with malabsorption syndrome after long-term treatment with gluten-free diet (preliminary report)]. Psychiatr Pol. 1991 Mar-Apr;25(2):130-4. Polish.

    Jayci Drew
    Celiac.com 02/08/2017 - "What if the kid you bullied at school, grew up, and turned out to be the only surgeon who could save your life?" --Lynette Mather
    If you ask any high school senior what in their life has changed the most since kindergarten, statistics show that many would answer moving from one school to another. However, the more drastic of changes are seen such as illnesses diagnosed during these critical school ages. In 2009 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, and that diagnosis has impacted my life in both positive and negative ways for my past, present, and future time at Indiana Area High School and beyond. Personally I have had to deal with bullying because of my disabilities. Bullying by definition is the use of force or coercion to abuse or intimidate others. I along with 20% of my peers nationwide in grades 9-12 (The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System) experience bullying in many different forms. Bullying can be teasing, hitting, leaving someone out, whispering behind backs, online harassment, shoving, remarks about race, sexuality, and disabilities. Before my diagnosis I was considered "normal" but as a result of my illness and "strange" dietary needs therefore I have been bullied. However, looking back on my experience I am happy to have dealt with the resistance because it has made me a better, more confident individual.
    I, like three million fellow Americans nationwide (National Celiac Disease), must deal with the stress of having celiac disease. I was diagnosed in 2009 after having lost my eyesight to a migraine. Celiac Disease is an often under-diagnosed autoimmune disease wherein the person cannot eat wheat, rye, barley, or oats, otherwise known as gluten, because their antibodies will attack their own system leading to other serious health issues such as cancer. Celiac Disease is spread through genes; my entire family, including my father, mother, and sister, has this disease. However, even with the growing awareness of celiac disease, there is also a growing skepticism. "Critics" of my disease claim that the gluten free diet is a fad. Many celebrities have tried to lose weight and failed to stay on this difficult diet. Restaurant chains are coming out with new gluten free menus every day to raise prices and profits, though they refuse to educate their servers about what someone with a gluten "allergy" cannot eat. While some people are sympathetic and know the outstanding facts about celiac disease, most of the population stays in the dark about this ailment. This causes frustration for people with celiac disease, like me, to have to deal with the resulting brick wall of resistance.
    In my small community it is very rare for someone to have such a disease that the public knows little about. This can cause doubt and disbelief, especially at a high school where everyone is just trying to "fit in". When I was diagnosed in 2009, I had just started ninth grade and I had also started playing two high school sports, softball and tennis. For the softball team it was a well-known fact that after every away game the softball boosters would buy each girl a twelve inch sub from a local deli to eat on the way home. Whenever my parents and I contacted the booster president to explain the situation with my disability and that I simply would like to have a salad, we were met with backlash. I did not understand at the time why a parent would refuse to supply another child with food after a physical activity when everyone else was getting a meal. This quickly made me an outcast on the softball team as the "strange girl with the made up disease", causing me to feel stressed and awful about myself over something that I could not control. I would have loved to have been able to "fit in" and eat the subs like my teammates rather than being different, especially after growing up able to eat gluten! It was a hard transition to make. I went from being able to eat the subs, donuts, pizza, and any other fast-food product to a strict dietary regime.
    After my long process through the education system, I finally got the meal I had a right to have. Unfortunately, the boosters' actions, forced us to go through the school system to "prove" I had a legitimate excuse not to eat the subs. I was distanced from other members of the team and, in subsequent years, had to deal with backlash from my teammates. They do not understand that it is not a personal choice to avoid gluten. I have a disability. I simply cannot eat it. Instead, they go back to the first year when I was eating the same foods they ate, and I get blamed for wanting to be "special" and get the more expensive food. I know that I am not alone in my struggle and that people with celiac disease around the world deal with what I deal with everyday - just like others who are bullied for being different.
    The after effects from my being bullied have shown themselves even in everyday situations. I have learned a great deal about myself and respect for other individuals' differences. I believe that if I had not been bullied I would not have the self-confidence, integrity, sense of right and wrong, or leadership skills that I have now. It has allowed me to go above and beyond in tough situations, knowing that I can overcome them. I know that even though the times are tough with my disability, and that while others may never understand mine, I can certainly understand and respect theirs. I respect and do not judge others simply based on what they can or cannot eat. I also know that just because someone does not "look" ill on the outside does not mean they are not dealing with something awful on the inside. This allows me to make friends easily and to understand others more effectively. Being bullied has also allowed me to learn new leadership skills that I use in my volunteer work. I am confident in myself that I can go forward into the world of higher education and succeed because of the values I now hold dear.
    The most drastic change I have encountered in my high school career is the diagnosis of celiac disease in 2009. This diagnosis has impacted my life in both positive and negative ways, in the past, present, and future at Indiana Area High School and beyond. I have had to deal with bullying because of my disabilities. Bullying, by definition. is the use of force or coercion to abuse or intimidate others. I along with 20% of my peers nationwide in grades 9-12 (The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System) experience bullying in many different forms. After dealing with the effects of my being bullied, I know that it has made me a better person. I can travel the world and make lasting relationships based on acknowledging and respecting differences in every person I encounter.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/30/2017 - Huff Post recently featured a good article on empowering kids with food allergies, including celiac disease.
    The article, by Miriam Pearl, suggests that parents seek to promote awareness and self-reliance in such children, rather than simply providing for them quietly and looking to protect them from allergens.
    The basic message is to help kids gain all the skills needed to manage their condition, rather than seeking to rescue them. Pearl writes that "The more practice [children] have managing themselves in the outside world the better they will get at it." She offers a number of useful tips to help parents along.
    First, she says, start early. It's never too early to let kids know what's going on, and what you're doing to help them maintain their health.
    Second, work to make the children aware of the things that impact their health. Show them what it's like to shop, cook, and advocate for themselves.
    Third, strive to show, teach and model everything they must know about safe foods and danger foods.
    Fourth, take them to the store with you and let them find gluten-free items. Among other benefits, this will help them learn to read labels.
    Fifth, enlist their help in packing their lunches.
    Sixth, ask them to listen to whenever and wherever you ask for food that is safe.
    Seventh, make sure they learn to carry their own snacks, just in case they can't control what food is around them.
    If they learn to do it early, they might avoid learning the hard way, which happens when you forget to provide snack for them, and they go hungry while everyone else eats.
    Lastly, when dining out, engage them in your effort to get answers from waiters every time you order food.
    Helping children to clearly see and understand the challenges of being gluten-free and having food allergies, and what it means to deal with those challenges on a daily level, help prepare them to make the right choices when confronted with unfamiliar or uncomfortable situations involving gluten-free food. This, in turn, helps them lead happier, healthier gluten-free lives.
    Source:
    HuffPost.com

  • Recent Articles

    Connie Sarros
    Celiac.com 04/21/2018 - Dear Friends and Readers,
    I have been writing articles for Scott Adams since the 2002 Summer Issue of the Scott-Free Press. The Scott-Free Press evolved into the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. I felt honored when Scott asked me ten years ago to contribute to his quarterly journal and it's been a privilege to write articles for his publication ever since.
    Due to personal health reasons and restrictions, I find that I need to retire. My husband and I can no longer travel the country speaking at conferences and to support groups (which we dearly loved to do) nor can I commit to writing more books, articles, or menus. Consequently, I will no longer be contributing articles to the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. 
    My following books will still be available at Amazon.com:
    Gluten-free Cooking for Dummies Student's Vegetarian Cookbook for Dummies Wheat-free Gluten-free Dessert Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Reduced Calorie Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Cookbook for Kids and Busy Adults (revised version) My first book was published in 1996. My journey since then has been incredible. I have met so many in the celiac community and I feel blessed to be able to call you friends. Many of you have told me that I helped to change your life – let me assure you that your kind words, your phone calls, your thoughtful notes, and your feedback throughout the years have had a vital impact on my life, too. Thank you for all of your support through these years.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/20/2018 - A digital media company and a label data company are teaming up to help major manufacturers target, reach and convert their desired shoppers based on dietary needs, such as gluten-free diet. The deal could bring synergy in emerging markets such as the gluten-free and allergen-free markets, which represent major growth sectors in the global food industry. 
    Under the deal, personalized digital media company Catalina will be joining forces with Label Insight. Catalina uses consumer purchases data to target shoppers on a personal base, while Label Insight works with major companies like Kellogg, Betty Crocker, and Pepsi to provide insight on food label data to government, retailers, manufacturers and app developers.
    "Brands with very specific product benefits, gluten-free for example, require precise targeting to efficiently reach and convert their desired shoppers,” says Todd Morris, President of Catalina's Go-to-Market organization, adding that “Catalina offers the only purchase-based targeting solution with this capability.” 
    Label Insight’s clients include food and beverage giants such as Unilever, Ben & Jerry's, Lipton and Hellman’s. Label Insight technology has helped the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) build the sector’s very first scientifically accurate database of food ingredients, health attributes and claims.
    Morris says the joint partnership will allow Catalina to “enhance our dataset and further increase our ability to target shoppers who are currently buying - or have shown intent to buy - in these emerging categories,” including gluten-free, allergen-free, and other free-from foods.
    The deal will likely make for easier, more precise targeting of goods to consumers, and thus provide benefits for manufacturers and retailers looking to better serve their retail food customers, especially in specialty areas like gluten-free and allergen-free foods.
    Source:
    fdfworld.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/19/2018 - Previous genome and linkage studies indicate the existence of a new disease triggering mechanism that involves amino acid metabolism and nutrient sensing signaling pathways. In an effort to determine if amino acids might play a role in the development of celiac disease, a team of researchers recently set out to investigate if plasma amino acid levels differed among children with celiac disease compared with a control group.
     
    The research team included Åsa Torinsson Naluai, Ladan Saadat Vafa, Audur H. Gudjonsdottir, Henrik Arnell, Lars Browaldh, and Daniel Agardh. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Karolinska University Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institute, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Diabetes & Celiac Disease Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; and with the Nathan S Kline Institute in the U.S.A.
    First, the team used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to analyze amino acid levels in fasting plasma samples from 141 children with celiac disease and 129 non-celiac disease controls. They then crafted a general linear model using age and experimental effects as covariates to compare amino acid levels between children with celiac disease and non-celiac control subjects.
    Compared with the control group, seven out of twenty-three children with celiac disease showed elevated levels of the the following amino acids: tryptophan; taurine; glutamic acid; proline; ornithine; alanine; and methionine.
    The significance of the individual amino acids do not survive multiple correction, however, multivariate analyses of the amino acid profile showed significantly altered amino acid levels in children with celiac disease overall and after correction for age, sex and experimental effects.
    This study shows that amino acids can influence inflammation and may play a role in the development of celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/18/2018 - To the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service animals.
    If you’ve flown anywhere lately, you may have seen them. People flying with their designated “emotional support” animals. We’re not talking genuine service animals, like seeing eye dogs, or hearing ear dogs, or even the Belgian Malinois that alerts its owner when there is gluten in food that may trigger her celiac disease.
    Now, to be honest, some of those animals in question do perform a genuine service for those who need emotional support dogs, like veterans with PTSD.
    However, many of these animals are not service animals at all. Many of these animals perform no actual service to their owners, and are nothing more than thinly disguised pets. Many lack proper training, and some have caused serious problems for the airlines and for other passengers.
    Now the major airlines are taking note and introducing stringent requirements for service animals.
    Delta was the first to strike. As reported by the New York Times on January 19: “Effective March 1, Delta, the second largest US airline by passenger traffic, said it will require passengers seeking to fly with pets to present additional documents outlining the passenger’s need for the animal and proof of its training and vaccinations, 48 hours prior to the flight.… This comes in response to what the carrier said was a 150 percent increase in service and support animals — pets, often dogs, that accompany people with disabilities — carried onboard since 2015.… Delta said that it flies some 700 service animals a day. Among them, customers have attempted to fly with comfort turkeys, gliding possums, snakes, spiders, and other unusual pets.”
    Fresh from an unsavory incident with an “emotional support” peacock incident, United Airlines has followed Delta’s lead and set stricter rules for emotional support animals. United’s rules also took effect March 1, 2018.
    So, to the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service and emotional support animals.
    Source:
    cnbc.com

    admin
    WHAT IS CELIAC DISEASE?
    Celiac disease is an autoimmune condition that affects around 1% of the population. People with celiac disease suffer an autoimmune reaction when they consume wheat, rye or barley. The immune reaction is triggered by certain proteins in the wheat, rye, or barley, and, left untreated, causes damage to the small, finger-like structures, called villi, that line the gut. The damage occurs as shortening and villous flattening in the lamina propria and crypt regions of the intestines. The damage to these villi then leads to numerous other issues that commonly plague people with untreated celiac disease, including poor nutritional uptake, fatigue, and myriad other problems.
    Celiac disease mostly affects people of Northern European descent, but recent studies show that it also affects large numbers of people in Italy, China, Iran, India, and numerous other places thought to have few or no cases.
    Celiac disease is most often uncovered because people experience symptoms that lead them to get tests for antibodies to gluten. If these tests are positive, then the people usually get biopsy confirmation of their celiac disease. Once they adopt a gluten-free diet, they usually see gut healing, and major improvements in their symptoms. 
    CLASSIC CELIAC DISEASE SYMPTOMS
    Symptoms of celiac disease can range from the classic features, such as diarrhea, upset stomach, bloating, gas, weight loss, and malnutrition, among others.
    LESS OBVIOUS SYMPTOMS
    Celiac disease can often less obvious symptoms, such fatigue, vitamin and nutrient deficiencies, anemia, to name a few. Often, these symptoms are regarded as less obvious because they are not gastrointestinal in nature. You got that right, it is not uncommon for people with celiac disease to have few or no gastrointestinal symptoms. That makes spotting and connecting these seemingly unrelated and unclear celiac symptoms so important.
    NO SYMPTOMS
    Currently, most people diagnosed with celiac disease do not show symptoms, but are diagnosed on the basis of referral for elevated risk factors. 

    CELIAC DISEASE VS. GLUTEN INTOLERANCE
    Gluten intolerance is a generic term for people who have some sort of sensitivity to gluten. These people may or may not have celiac disease. Researchers generally agree that there is a condition called non-celiac gluten sensitivity. That term has largely replaced the term gluten-intolerance. What’s the difference between celiac disease and non-celiac gluten-sensitivity? 
    CELIAC DISEASE VS. NON-CELIAC GLUTEN SENSITIVITY (NCGS)
    Gluten triggers symptoms and immune reactions in people with celiac disease. Gluten can also trigger symptoms in some people with NCGS, but the similarities largely end there.

    There are four main differences between celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity:
    No Hereditary Link in NCGS
    Researchers know for certain that genetic heredity plays a major role in celiac disease. If a first-degree relative has celiac disease, then you have a statistically higher risk of carrying genetic markers DQ2 and/or DQ8, and of developing celiac disease yourself. NCGS is not known to be hereditary. Some research has shown certain genetic associations, such as some NCGS patients, but there is no proof that NCGS is hereditary. No Connection with Celiac-related Disorders
    Unlike celiac disease, NCGS is so far not associated with malabsorption, nutritional deficiencies, or a higher risk of autoimmune disorders or intestinal malignancies. No Immunological or Serological Markers
    People with celiac disease nearly always test positive for antibodies to gluten proteins. Researchers have, as yet, identified no such antobodies or serologic markers for NCGS. That means that, unlike with celiac disease, there are no telltale screening tests that can point to NCGS. Absence of Celiac Disease or Wheat Allergy
    Doctors diagnose NCGS only by excluding both celiac disease, an IgE-mediated allergy to wheat, and by the noting ongoing adverse symptoms associated with gluten consumption. WHAT ABOUT IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME (IBS) AND IRRITABLE BOWEL DISEASE (IBD)?
    IBS and IBD are usually diagnosed in part by ruling out celiac disease. Many patients with irritable bowel syndrome are sensitive to gluten. Many experience celiac disease-like symptoms in reaction to wheat. However, patients with IBS generally show no gut damage, and do not test positive for antibodies to gliadin and other proteins as do people with celiac disease. Some IBS patients also suffer from NCGS.

    To add more confusion, many cases of IBS are, in fact, celiac disease in disguise.

    That said, people with IBS generally react to more than just wheat. People with NCGS generally react to wheat and not to other things, but that’s not always the case. Doctors generally try to rule out celiac disease before making a diagnosis of IBS or NCGS. 
    Crohn’s Disease and celiac disease share many common symptoms, though causes are different.  In Crohn’s disease, the immune system can cause disruption anywhere along the gastrointestinal tract, and a diagnosis of Crohn’s disease typically requires more diagnostic testing than does a celiac diagnosis.  
    Crohn’s treatment consists of changes to diet and possible surgery.  Up to 10% of Crohn's patients can have both of conditions, which suggests a genetic connection, and researchers continue to examine that connection.
    Is There a Connection Between Celiac Disease, Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity and Irritable Bowel Syndrome? Large Number of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Patients Sensitive To Gluten Some IBD Patients also Suffer from Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity Many Cases of IBS and Fibromyalgia Actually Celiac Disease in Disguise CELIAC DISEASE DIAGNOSIS
    Diagnosis of celiac disease can be difficult. 

    Perhaps because celiac disease presents clinically in such a variety of ways, proper diagnosis often takes years. A positive serological test for antibodies against tissue transglutaminase is considered a very strong diagnostic indicator, and a duodenal biopsy revealing villous atrophy is still considered by many to be the diagnostic gold standard. 
    But this idea is being questioned; some think the biopsy is unnecessary in the face of clear serological tests and obvious symptoms. Also, researchers are developing accurate and reliable ways to test for celiac disease even when patients are already avoiding wheat. In the past, patients needed to be consuming wheat to get an accurate test result. 
    Celiac disease can have numerous vague, or confusing symptoms that can make diagnosis difficult.  Celiac disease is commonly misdiagnosed by doctors. Read a Personal Story About Celiac Disease Diagnosis from the Founder of Celiac.com Currently, testing and biopsy still form the cornerstone of celiac diagnosis.
    TESTING
    There are several serologic (blood) tests available that screen for celiac disease antibodies, but the most commonly used is called a tTG-IgA test. If blood test results suggest celiac disease, your physician will recommend a biopsy of your small intestine to confirm the diagnosis.
    Testing is fairly simple and involves screening the patients blood for antigliadin (AGA) and endomysium antibodies (EmA), and/or doing a biopsy on the areas of the intestines mentioned above, which is still the standard for a formal diagnosis. Also, it is now possible to test people for celiac disease without making them concume wheat products.

    BIOPSY
    Until recently, biopsy confirmation of a positive gluten antibody test was the gold standard for celiac diagnosis. It still is, but things are changing fairly quickly. Children can now be accurately diagnosed for celiac disease without biopsy. Diagnosis based on level of TGA-IgA 10-fold or more the ULN, a positive result from the EMA tests in a second blood sample, and the presence of at least 1 symptom could avoid risks and costs of endoscopy for more than half the children with celiac disease worldwide.

    WHY A GLUTEN-FREE DIET?
    Currently the only effective, medically approved treatment for celiac disease is a strict gluten-free diet. Following a gluten-free diet relieves symptoms, promotes gut healing, and prevents nearly all celiac-related complications. 
    A gluten-free diet means avoiding all products that contain wheat, rye and barley, or any of their derivatives. This is a difficult task as there are many hidden sources of gluten found in the ingredients of many processed foods. Still, with effort, most people with celiac disease manage to make the transition. The vast majority of celiac disease patients who follow a gluten-free diet see symptom relief and experience gut healing within two years.
    For these reasons, a gluten-free diet remains the only effective, medically proven treatment for celiac disease.
    WHAT ABOUT ENZYMES, VACCINES, ETC.?
    There is currently no enzyme or vaccine that can replace a gluten-free diet for people with celiac disease.
    There are enzyme supplements currently available, such as AN-PEP, Latiglutetenase, GluteGuard, and KumaMax, which may help to mitigate accidental gluten ingestion by celiacs. KumaMax, has been shown to survive the stomach, and to break down gluten in the small intestine. Latiglutenase, formerly known as ALV003, is an enzyme therapy designed to be taken with meals. GluteGuard has been shown to significantly protect celiac patients from the serious symptoms they would normally experience after gluten ingestion. There are other enzymes, including those based on papaya enzymes.

    Additionally, there are many celiac disease drugs, enzymes, and therapies in various stages of development by pharmaceutical companies, including at least one vaccine that has received financial backing. At some point in the not too distant future there will likely be new treatments available for those who seek an alternative to a lifelong gluten-free diet. 

    For now though, there are no products on the market that can take the place of a gluten-free diet. Any enzyme or other treatment for celiac disease is intended to be used in conjunction with a gluten-free diet, not as a replacement.

    ASSOCIATED DISEASES
    The most common disorders associated with celiac disease are thyroid disease and Type 1 Diabetes, however, celiac disease is associated with many other conditions, including but not limited to the following autoimmune conditions:
    Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: 2.4-16.4% Multiple Sclerosis (MS): 11% Hashimoto’s thyroiditis: 4-6% Autoimmune hepatitis: 6-15% Addison disease: 6% Arthritis: 1.5-7.5% Sjögren’s syndrome: 2-15% Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy: 5.7% IgA Nephropathy (Berger’s Disease): 3.6% Other celiac co-morditities include:
    Crohn’s Disease; Inflammatory Bowel Disease Chronic Pancreatitis Down Syndrome Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Lupus Multiple Sclerosis Primary Biliary Cirrhosis Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Psoriasis Rheumatoid Arthritis Scleroderma Turner Syndrome Ulcerative Colitis; Inflammatory Bowel Disease Williams Syndrome Cancers:
    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (intestinal and extra-intestinal, T- and B-cell types) Small intestinal adenocarcinoma Esophageal carcinoma Papillary thyroid cancer Melanoma CELIAC DISEASE REFERENCES:
    Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University
    Gluten Intolerance Group
    National Institutes of Health
    U.S. National Library of Medicine
    Mayo Clinic
    University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center