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    Celiac Diease and Other Autoimmune Diseases Equals Low Inflammatory Diet

    Betty Wedman-St Louis, PhD, RD
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2014 Issue

    Celiac.com 08/29/2016 - In 2005 the National Institute of Health indicated more than 23 million Americans suffered from autoimmune disease. Today the projection is 30 million who experience extreme fatigue, muscle and joint pain, muscle weakness, sleeplessness, weight loss or gain, and memory problems as symptoms of autoimmune disorders.

    Celiac disease has gotten the most attention in antibody research, but the current data on cross-reactivity of antibodies is allowing a better understanding of gluten sensitivity. Antigen reactivity to alpha-gliadin can trigger immune attacks on many individuals beyond those with positive DQ 2, DQ 8 and TTG test results.

    Gluten ataxia has been identified not only in people with celiac disease, but also in autism, lupus and multiple sclerosis. The lack of muscle control for movement, speech, eye coordination and swallowing can now be assessed in most autoimmune disorders.

    Gliadin reacts with foods and human tissue antigens causing symptoms beyond the gastro-intestinal tract. A low inflammatory diet customized to each person through testing for cross-reactivity or elimination diet protocols is needed to restore a state of health and well-being (for a copy of Low Inflammatory Diet & Elimination Diets check the author's website at the end of this article).

    According to Aristo Vojdani, PhD, professor of neuroimmunology at Carrick Institute and Chief Science Advisor for Cyrex Labs, about 50 percent gluten-sensitive individuals are also sensitive to dairy proteins (cow's milk, casein, whey) and sensitivity to oats depends on the variety of the grain and not just contamination from the milling process.

    In the author's personal experience, a gluten-free diet has many limitations. The reactivity between alpha gliadin and corn, millet, oats, rice and dairy has been denounced as invalid by gastroenterologists and celiac disease researchers. While at a medical school in Missouri, biopsies did not show improvement in villous atropy until all alpha gliadin sources and corn, millet, rice and oats were removed from the diet.

    Intestinal permeability or leaky gut allows antigens into the blood stream including food proteins, pathogens, and toxic chemicals which can cause inflammation. Continuous antigen exposure to tissues and organs is a factor in developing autoimmune disorders. Symptoms develop silently in the gut, joints and endocrine glands for several years. Tissue destruction with T and B lymphocyte reactions are a warning that autoimmune issues are developing during the next 5 to 10 year period until immunosuppressive drugs like corticosteroids are needed.

    To reduce the triggers to autoimmune diseases early, nutrition and lifestyle habits need adjusting.

    A Gluten-free Diet may seem easier today than 10 years ago, but current regulations in many countries allow up to 20 ppm gluten to be labeled "gluten-free". Many gliadin and cross -reactive proteins are most likely still available to create inflammatory symptoms.

    Assessing Viral Activity is key to managing autoimmune disease symptoms. Viral panels for EBV, Lyme, Bartonella, Mycoplasma, Chlamydia, CMV are available. Nutrition management of viral load is critical for the person with celiac disease and other autoimmune diseases.

    Reducing Toxic Chemicals is just as important as omitting gluten. Plastics like bisphenol A, heavy metals, pesticide residues, solvents all create inflammation. Water filtration devices that remove fluoride, heavy metals and pathogens plus stainless steel water bottles could reduce the body burden of chemicals that influence digestive function, joint movement, and immune well-being.


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    Guest Julie Morris

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    Very interesting and helpful information. I just wish there was someone who understands these problems that you can talk to. I have allergic and sensitivities to many things now, wheat and then eggs then it really escalated after my strokes and when I say yet again eating many foods and a great many medications. I'm looked at with disbelief or as if I'm exaggerating which is really upsetting on top of really struggling to deal with what I don't fully understand, like how to manage with what seems like my body has gone against me . Thanks for this.

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    So interested in knowing where to start with testing for myself. Diagnosed at 33 with degenerative disc disease, 40 with celiac, 42 with Chiari I Malformation, and battling muscle and joint pain with a very active job. I can keep going in my job but would LOVE to keep going with a little less pain!

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  • About Me

    Betty Wedman-St Louis, PhD, RD is Assistant Professor, NY Chiropractic College, MS Clinical Nutrition Program Nutrition Assessment Course & Food Science Course.  She is author of the following books:

    • Fast and Simple Diabetes Menus, McGraw Hill Companies
    • Diabetes Meals on the Run, Contemporary Books
    • Living With Food Allergies, Contemporary Books
    • Diabetic Desserts, Contemporary Books
    • Quick & Easy Diabetes Menus Cookbook, Contemporary Books
    • American Diabetes Association Holiday Cookbook and Parties & Special Celebrations Cookbook, Prentice Hall Books

     

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