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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/07/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    THE 'MASKING' OF CELIAC: DO NOT IGNORE THE SMOKING GUN


    Dr. Rodney Ford M.D.


    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2014 Issue


    Celiac.com 01/02/2015 - What an odd thing to say: “Do not mask the appearance of celiac disease.” Inferring that you keep on eating gluten, despite early signs of celiac disease, until you get enough damage to your intestines that it can be seen under a microscope. I totally disagree with this concept—but this is still a common belief of medical practitioners.


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    For instance a dietitian said this recently: “Gluten-free diet as an experiment to see if you (or your children) feel better, can be beneficial, but this approach can mask underlying celiac disease.”

    Have you ever heard of a doctor “masking” the diagnosis of heart disease by failing to treat high blood pressure or high cholesterol until the patient has a heart attack? Ridiculous! Have you ever heard of a doctor “masking” the diagnosis of depression so that the person is suicidal before given help? Ridiculous!

    A colleagues writes: “As far as ‘masking’ celiac disease, that would be like saying that a person who is pre-diabetic should continue to eat lots of sugar and carbs so they can destroy enough beta cells to develop full blown diabetes. That eating low carb might mask diabetes. Meanwhile the pre-diabetic blood sugars can continue to damage the body in many insidious ways. Maybe these dietary changes should be looked at as preventive measures that are good.”

    So why is the “masking” concept reserved for celiac disease? I regard a slightly raised tTG result as a ‘smoking gun’ (this also goes for EMA and DGP). Yes, the concept of “do not go gluten-free so that you do not mask celiac disease diagnosis” is contentious.

    There are many threads to this problem:

    1. Celiac disease is a progressive condition—it slowly gets worse the longer you eat gluten;
    2. In the early stages of celiac disease, it cannot be diagnosed by endoscopy biopsy;
    3. The biopsy test is inaccurate and relies on experts to recognize early disease;
    4. Most people who get gluten-illness do not have celiac disease;
    5. Gluten-related-disorders-without-gut-damage are indistinguishable from early-celiac-without-gut-damaage-yet;
    6. Carrying the HLA DQ2/DQ8 gene cannot be used to make a diagnosis, but if you do not carry the gene, it will be very unlikely that you have celiac disease;
    7. The “masking” concept originated a few decades ago when biopsy was the only way to diagnose celiac disease;
    8. Now, the blood tests for celiac disease (EMA, tTG, DGP) are more accurate than the biopsy, and can turn positive BEFORE there is any histologic evidence of gut damage;
    9. Once celiac disease has become established, you cannot guarantee complete remission;
    10. Gluten challenge is detrimental to your health;
    11. A gluten challenge (to create serious bowel damage) can take years, during which time ongoing body damage (brain, skin and bowel) is ongoing;
    12. Celiac disease and gluten-senitivity often co-exist.

    This concept is addressed in my new book “Gluten-related disorder: sick? tired? grumpy?” Available as an ebook at http://www.GlutenRelatedDisorder.com.


    Image Caption: Photo: CC--Dennis Jarvis
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    Guest Michael

    Posted

    Dr. Ford has the same ideas that I have, and I am firmly in his camp regarding what we should do and hope for regarding gluten and the goals of society. on October 1, 2012, I had dinner(gluten-free) with Dr. Ford. Here is one of my principles: I follow the gastroenterologist a who are gluten-free. By that I mean doctors Fine and Ford. Dr. Kenneth Fine said many years ago that only 1% of Americans don't have an HLA-DQ gene that confers risk for gluten sensitivity. Dr. Marios Hadjivassiliou says that not only DQ2 and DQ8 confer risk for gluten ataxia, but also DQ5 and DQ6. Some researchers believe DQ7 and DQ9 give some risk for celiac. What's left? Only 2% of all Caucasian American HLA haplotypes, according to information on Wikipedia. This clearly shows how ludicrous it is to pursue drugs and vaccinations for celiac disease. The gastroenterologists who pursue such folly are gluten consumers, and as such are drug crazed addicts in my opinion.

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    Guest carolle

    Posted

    It would be interesting to see a rebuttal of this article by Dr. Green or Dr. Fasano.

    I went through blood work and it showed up negative for celiac disease...but I had been sick all my life and then one day I was told to look up the symptoms...I had most of them...so I decided to go gluten-free all the way and I have never felt better in my life as I do now. Most of my symptoms have gone away. I have been on this gluten-free diet for 6 years now. If I have anything with wheat, rye, barley, oat or anything modified or anything of the sort...I get really sick. I'm thankful I'm on the gluten-free diet. It is a life changing experience and something I have to stay on for the rest of my life. Some people do not understand but that doesn't matter all that matters is that I am healthy.

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    Guest Hialry

    Posted

    Thank you so much for bringing this to the attention of all of us. I appreciate being able to send dieticians, family and anyone to your references. This really explains a lot of misconceptions and by an expert... Thank you Dr. Ford.

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    Guest Deborah Ross

    Posted

    I was heartened to see this critique of what has passed for celiac diagnosis for so long. Just six years ago, after years of eating gluten (because at age 10 my pediatrician told my mother "she's outgrown the condition" the symptoms returned - with a vengeance. Everything I ate passed through me in under an hour. To make a long story short: I wound up putting myself back on a gluten-free diet despite a gastroenterologist poo-pooing (pun intended) my description of childhood symptoms and multiple family members with gluten intolerance. Today I enjoy relatively good health at nearly 67 years. I stay away from wheat, rye, and barley. I eat all other foods with great enjoyment! While I try to watch my salt intake, I use a large grain of this with doctors' advice!

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    Totally agree!!! I continually find it the height of unethical medicine to suggest that patients need to have such total damage to their intestines that an MD can see it before getting a 'real' celiac diagnosis. Why not have a questionnaire with a matrix of questions etc. and the blood test and HLA testing in order to diagnose the massive numbers of people without a proper diagnosis? The whole process of diagnosis needs an overhaul that works for everyone, not just those with good enough health insurance to guarantee they can afford the biopsy.

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    Thank you for posting this article. I was told by 3 GI medical docs to continue eating gluten, despite celiac disease family history and severe symptoms myself for years, because my biopsy and blood tests were negative. I smartly have followed the very simple strict gluten free diet now for years and I am glad I disregarded the bad advice. I have since told my anecdotal experience to many individuals who have shared similar stories of lack of helpfulness, or bad advice really, from their MDs. With all due respect to physicians, I personally wish more doctors would take a more out of the box approach with the complexities of this disease and gluten intolerance in general.

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    Guest Teresa

    Posted

    This article doesn't reveal that Dr. Ford believes that no one should eat gluten. "Everyone is at risk from eating gluten: any person, any symptom, any time." See his web site.

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    The problem doctors have with celiac disease is that it is only profitable during the diagnostic stage. Gluten damaged my rectum to such an extent that I required surgery. I had vision disrupting headaches. The moment we discovered the source of my suffering we were going to everything in our power to avoid the cause of my pain. Why would I voluntarily subject myself to the health destroying agent responsible just so the medical services industry can make more money?

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    Guest Margy tuckman

    Posted

    Excellent: my daughter was diagnosed by blood test eliminated the gluten and felt better very soon after/ her endoscopy was performed later and no damage found....would not have encouraged her to eat gluten if endo done first

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    Guest DedeGonzo

    Posted

    It would be interesting to see a rebuttal of this article by Dr. Green or Dr. Fasano.

    100% agreed.

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    Guest DedeGonzo

    Posted

    Fourteen year old daughter had many symptoms but negative to blood tests and no family history. Went on gluten challenge and was diagnosed on follow up endoscopy. Yes, I guess we can say that the challenge "caused" damage, however had we not done that, she may still be eating gluten to this day (she would not have gone gluten-free without proof). There are many celiacs who test negative to the blood tests, and even to the endoscopy. Not an easy disease to diagnose. That goes without saying.

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    Guest Danielle

    Posted

    Ankylosing Spondylitis is another disease of immunity where doctors(not all) want to see "damage" to the joints(sacroiliac) before they will diagnose it. Fortunately they seem to be moving away from this. I agree that diagnosing through inducing damage is primitive.

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    Guest Brain Robinson

    Posted

    I always want to ask people who say don't stop eating gluten until tested, WHY? Would you tell a smoker to keep smoking until they get lung cancer? If a person feels better and healthier on a gluten free diet that they have chosen to eat, then more power to them. Getting diagnosed gets you nothing extra. No one gives you free pills or money or anything for getting diagnosed.

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    Guest Ramesh Shah, Ph.D.

    Posted

    celiac disease/Gluten sensitivity represents in the simplest form antigen-antibody or allergic reactions. The receptors on endothelium and T-cells in an activated state react with the antigen (gluten) and cause the damage to the intestinal lining. When you take gluten away (from the diet) by consuming gluten free diet or even by taking the enzyme (AN-PEP) with the low gluten or "so called" gluten-free diet, you have removed the cause of the disease, pure and simple.

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    Please send more info on gluten intolerance and anxiety and depression.

    Sue, you can easily do your own research ..... just "ask" Google the following ... "are gluten intolerance and anxiety related to celiac disease" ? You will get many responses to your question. Read many of the numerous responses to get a well-rounded bit of information.

     

    BTW -- People tend to use words that "say" one thing but mean another such as using the word allergy. A wheat allergy is a separate thing and not the same as celiac disease. When you have celiac disease that does not mean you are "allergic" to gluten. The same applies when you've been diagnosed with non-celiac gluten sensitivity. For those of us with a gluten (actually gliaden) intolerance -- the proper terms are those used above. I hope this is helpful to you.

    Keep reading and researching .....

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    Good information. It helped me understand some symptoms that I actually have never had. My Dr. was concerned because I was taking iron pills...more research was done.

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    Guest Sylvia Dellas

    Posted

    Is it possible that the processed food industry has an interest in putting down the idea of going gluten free? After all, there are not many processed foods that celiacs would feel safe in consuming. I go down the frozen food cases and toss back one package after another because there is wheat listed in the ingredients. It is nice to be able to pop some enchiladas in the microwave for a quick dinner, but most contain wheat, even though the tortillas are made from corn. I think that wheat is a cheap filler/thickener to use in food, so it appears in most everything. And wheat is ubiquitous in the snack food aisles. Just think of the drop in snack food consumption if a large percentage of the population went gluten free. It would be interesting to know if the food industry sponsors physician conferences in which there is discussion of going gluten free.

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    admin

    Great Smokies Diagnostic Laboratory (GSDL), a private, rapid-growth Functional Medicine Clinical laboratory, announced today receipt of 510(K) market clearance from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for its Intestinal Permeability test kit, utilizing the lactulose-mannitol challenge drink. Used in the non-invasive assessment of intestinal permeability, the test demonstrated its superior sensitivity as compared to the existing d-xylose test in measuring intestinal permeability, a measurement used in the diagnosis of gastrointestinal malabsorption syndromes, such as celiac disease, colitis, Crohns disease, and Irritable Bowel Syndrome.
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    Celiac.com 2/13/2003 - This new study emphasizes the importance of following a strict gluten-free diet, and getting regular follow-up biopsies after your diagnosis. It also speaks to the need to discover whether or not you may have additional food intolerance, such as to cows milk (casein), soy, corn, etc., as some of these can also cause intestinal damage similar to that of celiac disease. -Scott Adams

    Lee SK, Lo W, Memeo L, Rotterdam H, Green PH.
    Gastrointest Endosc 2003 Feb;57(2):187-91
    Current affiliations: Department of Surgical Pathology and Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York.
    BACKGROUND: The diagnosis of celiac disease requires characteristic histopathological changes in an intestinal biopsy with clinical improvement in response to a gluten-free diet. Endoscopy with procurement of biopsy specimens is often performed to document response to the diet, but there are little data on the appearance of treated celiac disease. This study examined the endoscopic and histopathological appearance of the duodenum of patients with celiac disease whose diet was gluten-free.
    METHODS: A cohort of 39 adult patients (mean age 52 years, range 20-74 years) with biopsy-proven celiac disease was retrospectively reviewed. All had responded clinically to a gluten-free diet that they had maintained for a mean of 8.5 years (range 1-45 years). The endoscopic and histopathological appearances of the duodenal mucosa were reviewed. Blinded review of the diagnostic (initial) and post-treatment biopsy specimens was also performed to assess response of individual patients to the diet.
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    CONCLUSIONS: Despite a good clinical response, abnormal endoscopic and histopathological appearances persist in the majority of patients with celiac disease treated with a gluten-free diet.
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    Celiac.com 05/08/2007 - A recent study published in the journal Digestive Diseases and Sciences indicates that lesser degrees of villous atrophy correspond to seronegative celiac disease.
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    71% of participants showed total villous atrophy and 29% showed partial villous atrophy. Of those with total villous atrophy, 77% tested positive for endomysial antibody, compared to 33% with partial villous atrophy (P < 0.001). No difference in sensitivity was found between those who classical presentation of celiac disease versus those with silent presentation.
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    Lastly, the study showed that, in clinical practice, serologic tests lack the sensitivity reported in the literature.
    Digestive Diseases and Sciences, 2004 Apr; 49(4):546-50.
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    Celiac.com 05/28/2010 - Celiac disease research is linking Irritable Bowel Syndrome with gluten intolerance and doctors are recommending IBS sufferers, especially those with diarrhea-predominant IBS, to get tested for gluten issues or celiac disease. Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease. The source of this being gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye, often affecting the entire body and manifesting various physical and mental symptoms, and a gluten-free diet is the simple treatment for this disease.
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    After a correct diagnosis is made, people with IBS who are also celiac can begin the rapid road to recovery with a gluten-free diet. As people become more aware of celiac disease and gluten intolerance, gluten-free foods and gluten-free cooking become more and more available. There are now many delicious gluten-free recipes available for favorite foods and desserts such as gluten-free pizza, gluten-free muffins, and gluten-free cupcakes. Adults and children alike who are gluten intolerant can still enjoy a gluten-free balanced diet with a variety of gluten-free choices.
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    Dr. Rodney Ford M.D.
    Celiac.com 07/15/2016 - This week I have noticed many blogs/articles claiming that the only illness that can be caused by gluten is celiac disease. Yes, they state that celiac disease alone needs a gluten-free diet. I totally disagree with this distorted out-of-date viewpoint. There are tens of millions of non-celiac people who testify that gluten causes them significant harm. It is my suspicion that the wheat lobby is cranking up these anti-gluten-free messages as a way of stopping wheat sales from slumping. Why else promote such a barrage of misinformation?
    As if to counter such negative press, I got this email last week:
    "Dear Dr Ford, since we had our appointment I have taken George off gluten and have noticed a huge difference in his behaviour. George is now a much more sociable and loveable little boy. He has manners, he shares and he will say sorry if he has done something wrong. Obviously he is still a 4 year old boy so I have to expect some behaviour issues and sibling rivalry. Thank you so much for giving me my little boy back." By way of explanation, George was aggressive and having difficulty learning, he was easily distractible and he was always fighting with his sister. His parents saw him as being a naughty boy, however he was displaying severe ADHD behaviours. They wondered if he might need some medication and were exploring psychological help for their family.
    However, as I have seen a lot of behaviour-disturbed children get completely better off gluten. So I tested him for celiac disease (this was negative), I then recommended a strict gluten-free trial for three months. As you have read, his parents say that there has been a dramatic change, and now see him as a "sociable and loveable little boy" – in just a few weeks!
    To me this is clear evidence that gluten can cause significant inflammatory damage to our nerves and brains. George was displaying ADHD behaviours, triggered by gluten. It is a pity that those who are ridiculing the gluten-free diet movement are attempting to deny children like George the knowledge of healing on a gluten free diet.
    Evidence points to the nervous system as the prime site of gluten damage. This theory is attractive because it gives a unifying answer that explains the following conundrums:
    a mechanism of the non-gut symptoms of celiac disease; the behaviour disturbances caused by gluten reactions; the psychiatric and personality disorders provoked by gluten; the multitude of neurological symptoms; the autonomic nervous system disturbances (often seen in people with celiac disease); why such small amounts of gluten can cause such major reactions by the amplification effect of the nervous system (not dependent on any gut damage); why gluten can create such a diverse range of symptoms. Because any agent that causes widespread neurological harm (think of multiple sclerosis and Syphilis) can generate almost any array of symptoms. Nerve and brain damage from gluten can also explain why celiac patients with extensive gut damage can be asymptomatic. The histological gut damage in celiac disease is not mediated through this neurologic system: it is caused by local toxicity to the bowel in susceptible people. If these people are not highly sensitized to gluten, then they may not experience any symptoms mediated through neural networks.
    I got mad and grumpy
    I would also like to tell you about Nick. When he was 8 years old he wrote his story down for me:
    "My name is Nick and I am eight and a half years old. I had a problem when I had gluten, so my mum found Doctor Ford to help me. He helped me get off gluten. When I tasted the first chocolate biscuit it tasted weird but now I'm getting used to it. I had troubles when I was on gluten. Every day I got mad with myself and sometimes with others. I didn't want to be mad. I was grumpy." I had dizzy spells
    I also had dizzy spells every day and I didn't feel well. They thought that I had a heart problem when I was 8. I went to the doctor and to the hospital lots and lots as they were trying to figure out what was wrong with me. I wasn't very well. When I was on gluten I had sore tummies at least twice a week.
    I am off gluten and I have more energy
    Now I am on a gluten-free diet. When I'm off gluten, I still sometimes have dizzy spells – but not usually. You might lose weight when you first start go gluten-free because you are getting used to it.
    At school I found I had to get off gluten, as I couldn't sit still on the mat. I now have got more energy to run. I can sprint now. I can sleep better too. I used to not have enough energy but now I have enough energy to sprint around the cross-country. I've achieved in my spelling now and I'm much better at school. My Doctor Ford is a nice man because he talks nicely. Tons of people need to go and see him.
    Gluten-free helps your attitude
    Please come to our diet because it helps you breath better, it helps your attitude change. It makes you be stronger. Me and my brother used to fight a lot when I was on gluten but we like one another now. I liked gluten foods but I can't have it as it's not good for me.
    In my family we have got a dog and four humans – Jordan, Dad, Mum and me. We are all gluten-free but my dad doesn't have to be gluten-free. It's unfair when my dad eats gluten and it makes me feel hungry.
    The food can be nice
    Our gingerbread bakery bakes us nice food. When I found out I was allowed to have a gluten-free birthday cake I was very happy. We go to Gingerbreads once a week. I buy chocolate chip biscuits they taste delicious. World come and be gluten-free as it makes me delighted! I love people that make yummy gluten-free foods.
    My brother says that being on a gluten-free diet is like being in China with no noodles. He finds it hard and says he just wants to be normal. I say he will get used to it.
    Nick
    Nick's mum adds:
    Prior to going gluten-free Nick had the following list of symptoms:
    Rashes Sore tummy and runny poos Very irritable Very tired – slept more than 12 hours Poor memory and learning hard work Behaviour problems – got very angry with others Bad hay fever and asthma Intolerant to dairy Dizzy spells for 6 months and not feeling well Very fussy eater. The good news is that of today (six months later), he is not having a lot of these symptoms and he is a much nicer person all around. He can now have dairy products again."
    Mum
    The implication of gluten causing neurologic network damage is immense. With estimates that at least one in 10 people are affected by gluten, the health impact in enormous. Understanding the components of the gluten syndrome is important for the health of the global community.
    Written in the spirit of cooperation and knowledge sharing. You can read many more patient stories in my book "Gluten-Related Disorder: Sick? Tired? Grumpy?" http://www.GlutenRelatedDisorder.com 

    Betty Wedman-St Louis, PhD, RD
    Celiac.com 10/18/2016 - Vitamin K was discovered in 1929 and named for the German word koagulation with Herrick Dam and Edward A. Doisy receiving the Nobel Prize for their research in 1943. But Vitamin K is a multi-functional nutrient.
    Vitamin K1 or phyloquinone is found in green leafy vegetables like spinach and used by the liver for blood coagulation within 10 hours.
    Vitamin K2 or menaquinone (referred to as MK-4 through MK-10) comes from natto (fermented soybeans), organ meats, egg yolks, and raw milk cheeses. It circulates throughout the body over a 24 hour period and is synthesized in the human gut by microbiota according to the Annual Review of Nutrition 2009. Aging and antibiotic use weakens the body's ability to produce K2 so supplementation needs to be considered.
    The Rotterdam Study in the Journal of Nutrition 2004 brought into focus the role of K2 as an inhibitor of calcification in the arteries and the major contributor to bone rebuilding osteocalcin- NOT calcium supplementation that many health professionals had recommend. The study reports K2 resulted in 50 percent reduction in arterial calcification, 50 percent reduction in cardiovascular deaths, and 25 percent reduction in all cause mortality. K1 had no effect on cardiovascular health.
    Dennis Goodman, M.D. in Vitamin K2- The Missing Nutrient for Heart and Bone Disease describes why most western diets are deficient in K2. Dietary awareness of Vitamin K has focused on anti-clotting since warfarin was approved as a medicine (in 1948 it was launched by the Germans as rat poisoning) and President Eisenhower was administered warfarin following his heart attack. Little attention was paid to any other nutritional importance this essential fat-soluble vitamin could provide.
    Menaquinones (K2 or MK) are rapidly depleted without dietary intake of natto or animal sources needed for repletion which results in bone health issues, especially in menopause. Without it, the body does not use calcium and Vitamin D3 to activate osteoblasts to rebuild bone. Menaquinones cause cells to produce a protein called osteocalcin which incorporates the calcium into the bone. Without it, calcium moves into the artery wall and soft tissues of the body leading to hardening of the arteries and osteoporosis.
    The benefit of K2 is not new research. In 1997 Shearer presented the roles of vitamins D and K in bone health and osteoporosis prevention in the Proceedings of Nutrition Society. The Osteoporosis International meeting in New Zealand 2013 re-emphasized this nutrient's importance proclaiming the best treatment for osteoporosis is achieving a strong peak bone mass before 30 years old and increasing Vitamin K2 food sources in the diet throughout life.
    The richest food source of K2 is the Japanese fermented soybean natto, which is produced with Bacillus natto, a bacterium that converts K1 to MK-7. Fermented cheeses like Swiss and Jarlsberg contain Mk-8 and Mk-9 which can be converted to K2 at a 20 to 40 percent lower rate than from natto, but more appealing to the western taste buds. Grass-fed beef and egg yolks are the most common source of K2 in the American diet.
    For those who have not acquired a taste for fermented soybeans or natto, my nutrition mentor, Adelle Davis, had it right when she recommended eating liver once a week. Celiacs need to be sure that their diets include ample red meats, eggs and fermented cheeses or yogurt or else dietary supplementation with Vitamin K2 (MK-4) is recommended. Without it, bones can become soft tissues and arteries "turn to stone" or calcified.
    A Chart of Vitamin K levels in Foods can provide insight into food choices for menaquinone compared to Vitamin K1. It was adapted from Schurgers et al. Nutritional intake of vitamins K1 (phylloquinone) and K2 (menaquinone) in the Netherlands. J Nutr. Environ. Med. 1999.
     
    Food K1 MK-4 MK-7,8,9 Meats 0.5-5 1-30 0.1-2 Fish 0.1-1 0.1-2   Green Vegetables 100-750     Natto 20-40   900-1200 Cheese 0.5-10 0.5-10 40-80 Eggs (yolk) 0.5-2.5 10-25    
    The American Heart Association and many medical professionals who advocated no organ meats or red meat and egg yolks, deprived Americans of primary sources of Vitamin K2 which is essential for bone and cardiovascular health.

    Dr. Rodney Ford M.D.
    Celiac.com 04/26/2017 - "The universe is made of stories, not atoms" — Muriel Rukeyser
    Helen, a woman with severe lifelong eczema/dermatitis, wrote to me a few weeks ago, saying "I have taken your advice and been strictly gluten free for five months now. The eczema inflammation is 99% gone and my skin quality has significantly improved. I do still get a bit itchy around my neck area and elbow creases, more so at night when it is warm.
    I have noticed a significant improvement in my asthma also. I still use antihistamines perhaps once or twice a week for runny nose. Does this mean I will need to be gluten free for life? Which of your books would you say would be the most relevant for someone in my position? Thank you for your assistance, regards, Helen.
    I recommended eBook: "Dermatitis Eczema: Gluten Wheat – Solving the eczema puzzle." Available at: http://www.GlutenEczema.com
    This is an excerpt from the chapter: "Children better off gluten/wheat".
    To help you get a better idea of how gluten can trigger eczema, here are narratives of some children whose eczema got better when their gluten sensitivity was recognised and treated. Most had good remission of their eczema on a gluten-free diet. Their stories told by their parents.
    To give context to the blood test values, the normal reference ranges were:
    AGA: 0–15 tTG: 0–20 Celiac disease with bad eczema
    Lily at five years old was diagnosed by me with celiac disease. Symptoms: eczema. Run down, pot tummy and slow growth. Tests: All of her blood tests were positive for celiac disease (tTG 120) and she had an abnormal intestinal biopsy which confirmed the bowel damage of celiac disease. AGA very high (115).
    Her mum said:

    "Lily has now been gluten-free for the last year. She came to see Dr. Ford to investigate her allergies. She had a blocked nose and troublesome eczema. She also had quite a pot tummy and Dr Ford said that her growth was slow (she was thin and short). Dr Ford said that she needed blood tests for gluten and celiac disease: these were both positive. So she had an endoscopy, which was abnormal, showing the villus blunting of celiac disease. Therefore, she had to go on a gluten-free diet."
    "Since she has been gluten-free over the last year, she has gotten better and better. She no longer has lots of infections, she has more energy, and interestingly, her allergies have nearly gone away. Her skin used to give her a lot of trouble – she had a lot of bad eczema. Her eczema now is very much better and she only has small amounts left in her creases. And if she has any gluten errors it flares up."
    Recovering from gluten-eczema
    Isabella, at two years old, was recovering from her eczema. I asked her mother what happens if Isabella has any gluten. Her mum said:

    "Isabella had eczema all over her body. She was on strong steroid creams. She had the positive blood tests for gluten antibodies (AGA of 66), so it was suggested I take her off the gluten. I did this."
    "I took her off gluten and it has cleared her eczema up. Now, when she does eat anything with gluten in it she gets little patches of eczema on her legs. I just can't believe it!"
    Blood all over her sheets
    Emily was three years old. She had a high anti-gliadin antibodies (AGA 48) but she did not have celiac disease (normal tTG). Her mother told me:

    "Initially her skin was really sore, dry and scratchy. She would have blood all over her sheets in the morning from scratching while she was asleep. Her poos were really sloppy and nasty."
    "But after taking gluten out of her diet her skin cleared up within days, and the itchiness of her skin settled. She was just so much happier."
    Dry skin and worsening eczema
    Breanna and Alyssa, twins aged 3 years. Symptoms: eczema and poor sleeping. Both had high AGA levels (60 & 68) and normal tTG levels (5 & 3). They did not warrant an endoscopy.
    Mum writes:

    "My twins were born at 26 weeks. During our stay in NICU they developed very dry skin, at times you felt like you wanted to peel the dry skin off. The word eczema was mentioned on more than one occasion. There is a history of eczema and asthma in our family, so at the time I tried to deny all knowledge of that word."
    Dry skin and worsening eczema
    "Eleven weeks later we took our twins home. Their skin was still dry and we were given a moisturiser to use as required. As time went on their skin didn't improve and eventually at around the age of one year they showed real signs of eczema. We started to use steroid creams: 1% Hydrocortisone to start with, then onto a much stronger steroid cream. Soon, this stronger cream was used all the time to control their eczema as the other creams were of no real help."
    "At around 2 years old, while at a playgroup session one of the mothers was talking about her daughter's eczema and how she had gone to see Dr Ford and now there were no signs of it there today. Of course my ears pricked up. I was interested to hear how her diet affected her skin and the word gluten was mentioned."
    At the time it didn't mean a lot to me. Therefore, I made an appointment and I was excited to think that we might be able to change the girls' diet and their skin condition may improve.
    They had positive gluten blood tests
    "The day arrived and we had our first visit. He talked to us about this gluten thing and that if we could avoid it then their skin might make a dramatic improvement. I was keen to try anything. Firstly, they had to have some skin prick allergy tests – it showed a reaction to wheat among a few other things. Next, the girls had a blood test confirming that they definitely had an allergy to gluten, and their iron levels were also very low. The final step was to set about changing their diet. I can honestly say that this was daunting to start with but once we got our heads around the issues, it became second nature."
    Sleeping at last!
    "One of the biggest changes we have noticed is that they are now sleeping so much better. I was constantly up and down to them all night and was getting so worn out now we can almost guarantee a full nights sleep, Yahoo!! The other major issue was the steroid cream use: we haven't used the strong steroid cream for 12 months. So for me, going gluten-free was a huge step in the right direction."
    Gluten-free gets easier
    "There are heaps of products that we can use and the staff in shops were very helpful with information and getting stock in. I have since brought a number of cook books all with sections on gluten-free that have been helpful. When baking or cooking, I now just do it the gluten-free way and everyone in our family eats it with no complaints. We have all adjusted accordingly."
    "Our thanks goes out to Dr Ford for all his help. I also send good luck to all of you who are about to embark on a gluten-free diet – the rewards will be well worth the sacrifice."
    Sharon
    Losing her hair – alopecia
    Ella, age 6 years. Symptoms: eczema, alopecia, moody, abdominal pain, multiple food allergy. AGA high (49), tTG normal (3), EMA negative, Small bowel biopsy, normal.
    Mum writes:

    "Ella is now age 6 years. At age 3 years Ella started to lose her hair. After a year of scalp treatment, by the time she turned 5 years old, all but one small patch had regrown."
    Losing her hair
    "About 4 months later a small patch of alopecia reappeared and her hair loss rapidly progressed from there. At this time her eczema, always present in a mild form, worsened and became almost impossible to control. Many forms of treatment were tried and all failed. Within the year Ella had lost all her hair and was constantly itching. Over this time Ella also complained of tummy pains and weight loss."
    Diagnosed as gluten-sensitive
    "As her father has celiac disease, we decided to get Ella checked. Her blood test was positive but the biopsy was negative for celiac disease. In discussion with the GP and some unanswered questions we eventually had an appointment with Dr Ford. After this appointment, Ella started on a strict gluten-free diet and has remained on it for the past 4 months."
    Amazing results
    "The results are amazing. Ella has stopped most of her scratching and she is far more comfortable. Ella's mood has changed and she is now a very happy little girl. Best news of all is that she has started to have a small amount of hair growth."
    "At no time, despite the variety of people seen and the fact that they were aware of family history, did anyone suggest getting Ella tested for celiac disease. It was purely parents at the end of their tether, pushing."
    Sue
    She was getting worse eczema
    Tessa, age 2 years. Symptoms: eczema, poor growth, multiple food allergy. Tests: AGA high (51), tTG normal (7), Biopsy not done.
    Mum writes:

    "Tessa was our first-born baby. She weighed a healthy 8lb and was breastfed until 6 months. I introduced solids at 5 months. Having given a bottle of expressed milk every night since she was 10 weeks, I found that she preferred this and weaned herself."
    Eczema at the time of solids
    "Tessa had eczema from the time she commenced solids, but it was manageable with mild steroid ointments. However, at six months her eczema became more distressing for her. She had her first course of antibiotics at this age."
    "We felt that we were using more and more topical steroids, oral antibiotics, and even a course of oral prednisone. None of these treatments felt satisfactory to her family. We needed a solution to prevent the problem. Not only was her skin getting worse but also she was quietly losing weight. A friend suggested visiting Dr Rodney Ford."
    Allergies to egg, dairy and peanuts
    "Our first visit involved an extensive medical history and allergy testing. Tessa was found to be allergic to egg, dairy, peanut, grass, and cats. We excluded the food allergens from her diet. But, over the next four months Tessa had a dramatic weight loss, going from the 50 percentile to falling off the Child Health nurse growth graph. She required more steroids, and antibiotics."
    Waking screaming
    "My angel baby, who had slept through the night from age 6 weeks, was now 16 months and woke every night screaming inconsolably. We were getting desperate, putting in an awful lot of work by eliminating dairy and egg with no rewards. With a new baby due to be born Tessa's exhausted parents needed answers. Back to Dr Ford we went. He suggested running some blood tests to check her gluten markers. It came back that her Anti-Gliadin Antibody was 51, suggesting that she was gluten-sensitive."
    Gluten-free as well!
    "We trailed a gluten-free, egg-free, and dairy-free diet. This was a totally overwhelming prospect for our family, as at that time we were introducing a two-week-old baby to the world! Luckily, Tessa's father, who too is an adult sufferer of eczema, was able to take all this on board and went off grocery shopping, bringing back lots of acceptable goodies. It was also at this time that I learnt of the real benefits of living in a small town."
    We had a gluten-free buddy
    "We were very fortunate that another mother of gluten-sensitive children took me by the hand grocery shopping, showing me how easy it is! Also, the church where we regularly attend made a whole week's worth of meals for the freezer which all fitted the requirements for Tessa's diet. All this really just through word of mouth!"
    At last she is better
    "We are so excited to see such an improvement. She has just been allergy tested again and we are able to introduce egg and dairy again. I had been giving small amounts of dairy already, hoping that she would have grown out of this. At one point all she would eat was cheese, so to get some calories into her that is what we fed her. Having Tessa on a gluten-free diet requires us to be organized and creative. It is especially difficult when you spontaneously decide to go out for the day: there are no guarantees that we will find appropriate food for Tessa, so usually we pack a lunch."
    Gluten-free is expensive
    "The food that is gluten-free is also usually twice the price of other foods. We have had to learn to bake, which is something I still struggle with. We have had some major disasters, especially baking cakes. Whenever it seems too difficult, and we are out of ideas, it is not too hard to find a reason to keep trying."
    Improved gluten free
    "Our little girl has significantly improved since becoming gluten-free. She has not required antibiotics or oral steroids for eczema since commencing the diet. We can now apply the topical steroid ointments as prescribed "sparingly". She no longer gets up in the morning, her pyjamas and sheets covered in blood, and forehead weeping. She can play in sandpits without fear that the sand will get into her sores, and once again they will be infected."
    "We are so lucky that something so simple as changing Tessa's diet has had such a dramatic affect on her life."
    Mum
    Think about the gluten-eczema link
    As you have been told by these families, gluten has been found to be an important trigger for eczema in these children.
    My research findings show that the majority of people over three years of age, who have ongoing and troublesome eczema, have gluten-sensitivity. When gluten is removed from their diets, they get better.
    Advice about blood testing for gluten and for information on a gluten-free diet can be found on our webpage: http://www.DrRodneyFord.com and in the previous chapters.
    This is an excerpt from Dr Rodney Ford's eBook, "Dermatitis Eczema: Gluten Wheat – Solving the eczema puzzle" Available at: http://www.GlutenEczema.com
    Written in the spirit of cooperation and knowledge sharing.

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/19/2018 - Previous genome and linkage studies indicate the existence of a new disease triggering mechanism that involves amino acid metabolism and nutrient sensing signaling pathways. In an effort to determine if amino acids might play a role in the development of celiac disease, a team of researchers recently set out to investigate if plasma amino acid levels differed among children with celiac disease compared with a control group.
     
    The research team included Åsa Torinsson Naluai, Ladan Saadat Vafa, Audur H. Gudjonsdottir, Henrik Arnell, Lars Browaldh, and Daniel Agardh. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Karolinska University Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institute, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Diabetes & Celiac Disease Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; and with the Nathan S Kline Institute in the U.S.A.
    First, the team used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to analyze amino acid levels in fasting plasma samples from 141 children with celiac disease and 129 non-celiac disease controls. They then crafted a general linear model using age and experimental effects as covariates to compare amino acid levels between children with celiac disease and non-celiac control subjects.
    Compared with the control group, seven out of twenty-three children with celiac disease showed elevated levels of the the following amino acids: tryptophan; taurine; glutamic acid; proline; ornithine; alanine; and methionine.
    The significance of the individual amino acids do not survive multiple correction, however, multivariate analyses of the amino acid profile showed significantly altered amino acid levels in children with celiac disease overall and after correction for age, sex and experimental effects.
    This study shows that amino acids can influence inflammation and may play a role in the development of celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/18/2018 - To the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service animals.
    If you’ve flown anywhere lately, you may have seen them. People flying with their designated “emotional support” animals. We’re not talking genuine service animals, like seeing eye dogs, or hearing ear dogs, or even the Belgian Malinois that alerts its owner when there is gluten in food that may trigger her celiac disease.
    Now, to be honest, some of those animals in question do perform a genuine service for those who need emotional support dogs, like veterans with PTSD.
    However, many of these animals are not service animals at all. Many of these animals perform no actual service to their owners, and are nothing more than thinly disguised pets. Many lack proper training, and some have caused serious problems for the airlines and for other passengers.
    Now the major airlines are taking note and introducing stringent requirements for service animals.
    Delta was the first to strike. As reported by the New York Times on January 19: “Effective March 1, Delta, the second largest US airline by passenger traffic, said it will require passengers seeking to fly with pets to present additional documents outlining the passenger’s need for the animal and proof of its training and vaccinations, 48 hours prior to the flight.… This comes in response to what the carrier said was a 150 percent increase in service and support animals — pets, often dogs, that accompany people with disabilities — carried onboard since 2015.… Delta said that it flies some 700 service animals a day. Among them, customers have attempted to fly with comfort turkeys, gliding possums, snakes, spiders, and other unusual pets.”
    Fresh from an unsavory incident with an “emotional support” peacock incident, United Airlines has followed Delta’s lead and set stricter rules for emotional support animals. United’s rules also took effect March 1, 2018.
    So, to the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service and emotional support animals.
    Source:
    cnbc.com

    admin
    WHAT IS CELIAC DISEASE?
    Celiac disease is an autoimmune condition that affects around 1% of the population. People with celiac disease suffer an autoimmune reaction when they consume wheat, rye or barley. The immune reaction is triggered by certain proteins in the wheat, rye, or barley, and, left untreated, causes damage to the small, finger-like structures, called villi, that line the gut. The damage occurs as shortening and villous flattening in the lamina propria and crypt regions of the intestines. The damage to these villi then leads to numerous other issues that commonly plague people with untreated celiac disease, including poor nutritional uptake, fatigue, and myriad other problems.
    Celiac disease mostly affects people of Northern European descent, but recent studies show that it also affects large numbers of people in Italy, China, Iran, India, and numerous other places thought to have few or no cases.
    Celiac disease is most often uncovered because people experience symptoms that lead them to get tests for antibodies to gluten. If these tests are positive, then the people usually get biopsy confirmation of their celiac disease. Once they adopt a gluten-free diet, they usually see gut healing, and major improvements in their symptoms. 
    CLASSIC CELIAC DISEASE SYMPTOMS
    Symptoms of celiac disease can range from the classic features, such as diarrhea, upset stomach, bloating, gas, weight loss, and malnutrition, among others.
    LESS OBVIOUS SYMPTOMS
    Celiac disease can often less obvious symptoms, such fatigue, vitamin and nutrient deficiencies, anemia, to name a few. Often, these symptoms are regarded as less obvious because they are not gastrointestinal in nature. You got that right, it is not uncommon for people with celiac disease to have few or no gastrointestinal symptoms. That makes spotting and connecting these seemingly unrelated and unclear celiac symptoms so important.
    NO SYMPTOMS
    Currently, most people diagnosed with celiac disease do not show symptoms, but are diagnosed on the basis of referral for elevated risk factors. 

    CELIAC DISEASE VS. GLUTEN INTOLERANCE
    Gluten intolerance is a generic term for people who have some sort of sensitivity to gluten. These people may or may not have celiac disease. Researchers generally agree that there is a condition called non-celiac gluten sensitivity. That term has largely replaced the term gluten-intolerance. What’s the difference between celiac disease and non-celiac gluten-sensitivity? 
    CELIAC DISEASE VS. NON-CELIAC GLUTEN SENSITIVITY (NCGS)
    Gluten triggers symptoms and immune reactions in people with celiac disease. Gluten can also trigger symptoms in some people with NCGS, but the similarities largely end there.

    There are four main differences between celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity:
    No Hereditary Link in NCGS
    Researchers know for certain that genetic heredity plays a major role in celiac disease. If a first-degree relative has celiac disease, then you have a statistically higher risk of carrying genetic markers DQ2 and/or DQ8, and of developing celiac disease yourself. NCGS is not known to be hereditary. Some research has shown certain genetic associations, such as some NCGS patients, but there is no proof that NCGS is hereditary. No Connection with Celiac-related Disorders
    Unlike celiac disease, NCGS is so far not associated with malabsorption, nutritional deficiencies, or a higher risk of autoimmune disorders or intestinal malignancies. No Immunological or Serological Markers
    People with celiac disease nearly always test positive for antibodies to gluten proteins. Researchers have, as yet, identified no such antobodies or serologic markers for NCGS. That means that, unlike with celiac disease, there are no telltale screening tests that can point to NCGS. Absence of Celiac Disease or Wheat Allergy
    Doctors diagnose NCGS only by excluding both celiac disease, an IgE-mediated allergy to wheat, and by the noting ongoing adverse symptoms associated with gluten consumption. WHAT ABOUT IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME (IBS) AND IRRITABLE BOWEL DISEASE (IBD)?
    IBS and IBD are usually diagnosed in part by ruling out celiac disease. Many patients with irritable bowel syndrome are sensitive to gluten. Many experience celiac disease-like symptoms in reaction to wheat. However, patients with IBS generally show no gut damage, and do not test positive for antibodies to gliadin and other proteins as do people with celiac disease. Some IBS patients also suffer from NCGS.

    To add more confusion, many cases of IBS are, in fact, celiac disease in disguise.

    That said, people with IBS generally react to more than just wheat. People with NCGS generally react to wheat and not to other things, but that’s not always the case. Doctors generally try to rule out celiac disease before making a diagnosis of IBS or NCGS. 
    Crohn’s Disease and celiac disease share many common symptoms, though causes are different.  In Crohn’s disease, the immune system can cause disruption anywhere along the gastrointestinal tract, and a diagnosis of Crohn’s disease typically requires more diagnostic testing than does a celiac diagnosis.  
    Crohn’s treatment consists of changes to diet and possible surgery.  Up to 10% of Crohn's patients can have both of conditions, which suggests a genetic connection, and researchers continue to examine that connection.
    Is There a Connection Between Celiac Disease, Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity and Irritable Bowel Syndrome? Large Number of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Patients Sensitive To Gluten Some IBD Patients also Suffer from Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity Many Cases of IBS and Fibromyalgia Actually Celiac Disease in Disguise CELIAC DISEASE DIAGNOSIS
    Diagnosis of celiac disease can be difficult. 

    Perhaps because celiac disease presents clinically in such a variety of ways, proper diagnosis often takes years. A positive serological test for antibodies against tissue transglutaminase is considered a very strong diagnostic indicator, and a duodenal biopsy revealing villous atrophy is still considered by many to be the diagnostic gold standard. 
    But this idea is being questioned; some think the biopsy is unnecessary in the face of clear serological tests and obvious symptoms. Also, researchers are developing accurate and reliable ways to test for celiac disease even when patients are already avoiding wheat. In the past, patients needed to be consuming wheat to get an accurate test result. 
    Celiac disease can have numerous vague, or confusing symptoms that can make diagnosis difficult.  Celiac disease is commonly misdiagnosed by doctors. Read a Personal Story About Celiac Disease Diagnosis from the Founder of Celiac.com Currently, testing and biopsy still form the cornerstone of celiac diagnosis.
    TESTING
    There are several serologic (blood) tests available that screen for celiac disease antibodies, but the most commonly used is called a tTG-IgA test. If blood test results suggest celiac disease, your physician will recommend a biopsy of your small intestine to confirm the diagnosis.
    Testing is fairly simple and involves screening the patients blood for antigliadin (AGA) and endomysium antibodies (EmA), and/or doing a biopsy on the areas of the intestines mentioned above, which is still the standard for a formal diagnosis. Also, it is now possible to test people for celiac disease without making them concume wheat products.

    BIOPSY
    Until recently, biopsy confirmation of a positive gluten antibody test was the gold standard for celiac diagnosis. It still is, but things are changing fairly quickly. Children can now be accurately diagnosed for celiac disease without biopsy. Diagnosis based on level of TGA-IgA 10-fold or more the ULN, a positive result from the EMA tests in a second blood sample, and the presence of at least 1 symptom could avoid risks and costs of endoscopy for more than half the children with celiac disease worldwide.

    WHY A GLUTEN-FREE DIET?
    Currently the only effective, medically approved treatment for celiac disease is a strict gluten-free diet. Following a gluten-free diet relieves symptoms, promotes gut healing, and prevents nearly all celiac-related complications. 
    A gluten-free diet means avoiding all products that contain wheat, rye and barley, or any of their derivatives. This is a difficult task as there are many hidden sources of gluten found in the ingredients of many processed foods. Still, with effort, most people with celiac disease manage to make the transition. The vast majority of celiac disease patients who follow a gluten-free diet see symptom relief and experience gut healing within two years.
    For these reasons, a gluten-free diet remains the only effective, medically proven treatment for celiac disease.
    WHAT ABOUT ENZYMES, VACCINES, ETC.?
    There is currently no enzyme or vaccine that can replace a gluten-free diet for people with celiac disease.
    There are enzyme supplements currently available, such as AN-PEP, Latiglutetenase, GluteGuard, and KumaMax, which may help to mitigate accidental gluten ingestion by celiacs. KumaMax, has been shown to survive the stomach, and to break down gluten in the small intestine. Latiglutenase, formerly known as ALV003, is an enzyme therapy designed to be taken with meals. GluteGuard has been shown to significantly protect celiac patients from the serious symptoms they would normally experience after gluten ingestion. There are other enzymes, including those based on papaya enzymes.

    Additionally, there are many celiac disease drugs, enzymes, and therapies in various stages of development by pharmaceutical companies, including at least one vaccine that has received financial backing. At some point in the not too distant future there will likely be new treatments available for those who seek an alternative to a lifelong gluten-free diet. 

    For now though, there are no products on the market that can take the place of a gluten-free diet. Any enzyme or other treatment for celiac disease is intended to be used in conjunction with a gluten-free diet, not as a replacement.

    ASSOCIATED DISEASES
    The most common disorders associated with celiac disease are thyroid disease and Type 1 Diabetes, however, celiac disease is associated with many other conditions, including but not limited to the following autoimmune conditions:
    Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: 2.4-16.4% Multiple Sclerosis (MS): 11% Hashimoto’s thyroiditis: 4-6% Autoimmune hepatitis: 6-15% Addison disease: 6% Arthritis: 1.5-7.5% Sjögren’s syndrome: 2-15% Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy: 5.7% IgA Nephropathy (Berger’s Disease): 3.6% Other celiac co-morditities include:
    Crohn’s Disease; Inflammatory Bowel Disease Chronic Pancreatitis Down Syndrome Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Lupus Multiple Sclerosis Primary Biliary Cirrhosis Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Psoriasis Rheumatoid Arthritis Scleroderma Turner Syndrome Ulcerative Colitis; Inflammatory Bowel Disease Williams Syndrome Cancers:
    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (intestinal and extra-intestinal, T- and B-cell types) Small intestinal adenocarcinoma Esophageal carcinoma Papillary thyroid cancer Melanoma CELIAC DISEASE REFERENCES:
    Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University
    Gluten Intolerance Group
    National Institutes of Health
    U.S. National Library of Medicine
    Mayo Clinic
    University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/17/2018 - Could the holy grail of gluten-free food lie in special strains of wheat that lack “bad glutens” that trigger the celiac disease, but include the “good glutens” that make bread and other products chewy, spongey and delicious? Such products would include all of the good things about wheat, but none of the bad things that might trigger celiac disease.
    A team of researchers in Spain is creating strains of wheat that lack the “bad glutens” that trigger the autoimmune disorder celiac disease. The team, based at the Institute for Sustainable Agriculture in Cordoba, Spain, is making use of the new and highly effective CRISPR gene editing to eliminate the majority of the gliadins in wheat.
    Gliadins are the gluten proteins that trigger the majority of symptoms for people with celiac disease.
    As part of their efforts, the team has conducted a small study on 20 people with “gluten sensitivity.” That study showed that test subjects can tolerate bread made with this special wheat, says team member Francisco Barro. However, the team has yet to publish the results.
    Clearly, more comprehensive testing would be needed to determine if such a product is safely tolerated by people with celiac disease. Still, with these efforts, along with efforts to develop vaccines, enzymes, and other treatments making steady progress, we are living in exciting times for people with celiac disease.
    It is entirely conceivable that in the not-so-distant future we will see safe, viable treatments for celiac disease that do not require a strict gluten-free diet.
    Read more at Digitaltrends.com , and at Newscientist.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/16/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to investigate whether alterations in the developing intestinal microbiota and immune markers precede celiac disease onset in infants with family risk for the disease.
    The research team included Marta Olivares, Alan W. Walker, Amalia Capilla, Alfonso Benítez-Páez, Francesc Palau, Julian Parkhill, Gemma Castillejo, and Yolanda Sanz. They are variously affiliated with the Microbial Ecology, Nutrition and Health Research Unit, Institute of Agrochemistry and Food Technology, National Research Council (IATA-CSIC), C/Catedrático Agustín Escardin, Paterna, Valencia, Spain; the Gut Health Group, The Rowett Institute, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK; the Genetics and Molecular Medicine Unit, Institute of Biomedicine of Valencia, National Research Council (IBV-CSIC), Valencia, Spain; the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Hinxton, Cambridgeshire UK; the Hospital Universitari de Sant Joan de Reus, IISPV, URV, Tarragona, Spain; the Center for regenerative medicine, Boston university school of medicine, Boston, USA; and the Institut de Recerca Sant Joan de Déu and CIBERER, Hospital Sant Joan de Déu, Barcelona, Spain
    The team conducted a nested case-control study out as part of a larger prospective cohort study, which included healthy full-term newborns (> 200) with at least one first relative with biopsy-verified celiac disease. The present study includes 10 cases of celiac disease, along with 10 best-matched controls who did not develop the disease after 5-year follow-up.
    The team profiled fecal microbiota, as assessed by high-throughput 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing, along with immune parameters, at 4 and 6 months of age and related to celiac disease onset. The microbiota of infants who remained healthy showed an increase in bacterial diversity over time, especially by increases in microbiota from the Firmicutes families, those who with no increase in bacterial diversity developed celiac disease.
    Infants who subsequently developed celiac disease showed a significant reduction in sIgA levels over time, while those who remained healthy showed increases in TNF-α correlated to Bifidobacterium spp.
    Healthy children in the control group showed a greater relative abundance of Bifidobacterium longum, while children who developed celiac disease showed increased levels of Bifidobacterium breve and Enterococcus spp.
    The data from this study suggest that early changes in gut microbiota in infants with celiac disease risk could influence immune development, and thus increase risk levels for celiac disease. The team is calling for larger studies to confirm their hypothesis.
    Source:
    Microbiome. 2018; 6: 36. Published online 2018 Feb 20. doi: 10.1186/s40168-018-0415-6