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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    THE COACH'S EDUCATIONAL JOURNEY


    Tony Allen, B.Sc., B.Ed.


    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2014 Issue


    Celiac.com 07/12/2016 - Late in 1998 after discussions with a colleague, who later became my mentor in this field, some loud bells started to ring inside my head as we talked about this little-known (to me at least) condition called celiac disease, an autoimmune disease, as well as non celiac gluten sensitivity. Both of these ailments are triggered by a family of dietary proteins called gluten. Of course, I had been following eating practices based on commonly held beliefs about wheat as the "staff of life" and doing things that were taught to me as 'scientifically accurate'. Yet talking with my colleague, I kept getting answers that implicated this nutritional food group for a myriad of problems that I'd had for as long as I could remember.


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    Hearing about these ailments caused by gluten, I started connecting some of my own experiences with the signs and symptoms he was talking about, especially in relation to my journey through the education system. Physical and behavioral problems had plagued my educational life, making it a disaster. I worked with various educational specialists, from the very beginning, yet they did not seem to be able to help me much. I couldn't maintain a pace of learning that was even remotely close to that of my peers, in most of my scholastic endeavors. As my self-esteem dropped, my behavior worsened. I found myself increasingly being removed from classes and from schools. I sometimes thought that if I heard the words "he just does not apply himself" one more time, I would spontaneously explode. That being said, I am still very thankful for some compassionate, caring teachers and coaches who saw through all my issues and stayed committed trying to help me muddle through and keep moving along in my educational journey.

    As a high school athletics coach and teacher of Health and Physical Education, now, I often find myself offering dietary concepts and information to students and colleagues that is at odds with what I learned at university just over 20 years ago. And the misinformation I learned is still commonly being touted, even today. Admittedly, research in the field of Nutrition has undergone some dramatic changes over the last two decades, but what I'm talking about is a more fundamental shift in thinking about what we eat and whether it will promote optimum athletic performance, protection from disease, longevity, and a healthy body composition that is more in line with wellness.

    For instance, I was taught that carbohydrates are the preferred fuel for our muscles, and that carbing-up prior to an athletic event is an effective and desirable strategy. I was also taught that weight loss could be achieved through increased physical activity. I now view these issues very differently. Athletic performance is often enhanced by avoiding many of the foods, such as gluten and sugar, that I was taught to value. Today, I am constantly seeing articles or interviews about high performance athletes who have left the old nutrition paradigm behind and are having great success and increased career longevity in their chosen field. Novak Djokovic is one prominent example where the underlying problem was celiac disease. Vande Velde and Tom Danielson are two professional cyclists who also report performance increases from a gluten-free diet (1). Such a shift in eating can also, especially among young people, remove or reduce learning disabilities as reported by one school that works only with children who struggle with dyslexia (2).

    Conventional thinkers seem to believe that these benefits have something to do with improved nutrient absorption. However, they may come from enhanced nerve conduction or function. After all, Marios Hadjivassiliou and his colleagues at the Royal Hallamshire Hospital at the University of Sheffield have long been reporting that gluten, even in the absence of celiac disease, is responsible for a large portion of neurological ailments of unknown origin (3). Or the improvements may come from something entirely different. But wherever the improved performance and health are coming from, the gluten-free diet seems to be a great starting place.

    For instance, a former student, C.W., who has given his permission for me to talk about his case, experienced dramatic changes on a gluten-free and dairy free diet. Already an accomplished athlete, C.W. had also struggled for years with serious academic problems. He struggled with his reading and his writing and was still functioning at the level of an elementary student. A colleague and I recommended that C.W. try this diet to hone his fitness. Not only did he enhance his athletic performance, his reading skills improved abruptly and dramatically. Both his comprehension and his reading speed increased significantly over just a few months. Before he had been on the diet a full year, he was reading novels for pleasure. This was a far cry from his prior brushes with reading, where he was often unable to remember what was said in a sentence he had just finished reading. Certainly, by the end of a paragraph he was previously unable to say how it had begun. Now, he is reading novels, enjoying the experience, and he remembers them well enough to be able to talk, in detail, about the story.

    My own experience with the gluten-free diet has not produced such rapid results, at least regarding my reading and writing. I certainly felt healthier very quickly, and found it much easier to have a leaner body composition. Many of my minor physical complaints also disappeared, but it has taken years for my struggles with reading to diminish. Today, I am able to read highly technical reports from the peer reviewed medical and nutritional literature. I also find myself reading large, technical books about nutrition and other health issues. I read them cover-to-cover, and I understand most of what I read.

    My writing is also improving gradually. There is no question in my mind that the gluten-free diet has helped me enormously in these areas, although much more slowly than they helped C.W. Neither do I know how many other children that a gluten-free diet could help. I can only say that if you or someone close to you experiences a learning disability or unexplained gastro intentional issues or withdrawal symptoms when trying to eliminate wheat for a short time, it would be very worthwhile to follow a strict gluten-free diet for six months.

    Sources:


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    Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.
    Celiac.com 05/01/2015 - In his article titled "Against the Grain," published in the November 3, 2014 issue of The New Yorker, Michael Specter likens the Gluten and Allergen Free Expo to "a travelling medicine show" in the first paragraph (1). Just in case a reader was half asleep and missed the bias embodied in that phrase, Specter ends the same first paragraph with: "There was even gluten-free dog food." It's hard to miss the harsh, cynical tone, and it is a shame that he usurped the name of Melissa Diane Smith's informative book to title his invective.
    What, we must wonder, is the source of his bias? He does offer some detailed explanations of the bond between glutenin and gliadin, and how carbon dioxide from the fermentation process is trapped as bread and other pastry rises, making light, fluffy bread and pastry. He has done some detailed, even impressive investigation into cooking with gluten. However, he also asserts that wheat-breeding practices haven't induced any changes that might explain the increased incidence of celiac disease since World War II. He then goes on to say: "But something strange is clearly going on. For reasons that remain largely unexplained, the incidence of celiac disease has increased more than fourfold in the past sixty years." Mr. Specter acknowledges that celiac disease is on the rise and, according to Specter, there have not been any major changes to the genetics of wheat that might explain this increase.
    This perspective appeared in a very prestigious, highly regarded publication—The New Yorker. Many people will believe these claims just because of where they were published. And here is the problem I have with that. Mr. Specter has the genetic information all wrong: Norman Borlaug was awarded a plethora of honors for his work in developing more than 6,000 new wheat hybrids, which included several strains of disease resistant, semi-dwarf wheat that increased per-acre yields by seven to ten fold, thereby leading to wheat independence in a number of third world nations. For these scientific accomplishments he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, the Presidential Medal of Freedom, and a Congressional Gold Medal. Several books have been written about Dr. Borlaug and his achievements, and several foreign governments, science academies, and institutions have bestowed him with awards, honorary degrees and memberships. Borlaug has even had streets, university wings, and assorted other places and artifacts named after him and has even been mentioned in popular television shows. He has been called the father of the "green revolution" and has enjoyed very widespread recognition for having been instrumental in saving many millions of lives through increasing the world's food supply in the form of wheat. It is my belief that this venerable and compassionate man of science deserved every honor that was bestowed on him (2).
    However, I also think that it besmirches Dr. Borlaug's memory when Specter dismisses all those genetic changes to wheat as a possible factor in "the growing number of cases" of celiac disease based on the statement by Dr. Donald Kasarda that he was unable to find "evidence that a change in wheat-breeding practices might have led to an increase in the incidence of celiac disease". One person's failure to find evidence for something does not prove the absence of that phenomenon. Mr. Specter also quotes Dr. Joseph Murray, the very popular and famous (at least in the gluten sensitive community) gastroenterologist at the Mayo Clinic, as an expert in wheat genetics, and quotes Dr. Murray as asserting that wheat genetics haven't changed much over the past fifty years. I'm skeptical that Dr. Murray would profess expertise in the realm of cereal grain genetics. Regardless of whether this is Mr. Specter's construct, or Dr. Murray did actually make this claim to expertise in wheat genetics and the assertion that little has changed in wheat genetics since World War II, the statement is at least incorrect when it comes to wheat genetics.
    The conundrum Mr. Specter has created by ignoring Dr. Borlaug's work sets up an article in which he attacks what he calls "gluten anxiety". He says that "nearly twenty million people contend that they regularly experience distress after eating products that contain gluten." The implication is clear. Mr. Specter would have us believe that these people are confused about changes to how they feel, and/or whether those changes resulted from switching to a gluten-free diet—apparently all twenty million of them are so confused that they now need Mr. Specter to lead them out of the darkness of their own self-delusion, and begin to appreciate that wheat, in its present genetic form, has been consumed for at least 10,000 years and it's "a staple food that has sustained humanity for thousands of years". I'd like to point out that the Levant, where wheat was first grown, was not host to all of humanity at that, or any other time. Many humans, after leaving Africa about 85,000 years ago, evolved in a variety of environmental niches where gluten grains have not been available until quite recently.
    And there are many genetic variations of wheat. Which ones, I wonder, is Mr. Specter saying have been with us for so long? Contrary to his assertions, it is this variability that serves as one of the greatest barriers to the development of genetic strains of wheat that are "safe" for consumption by people with celiac disease. Dr. Sachin Rustgi, one of the scientists who is trying to develop such a safe wheat also said that: "Different celiac patients are sensitive to different 'gluten' proteins (prolamins). If one feeds peripheral blood cells sampled from a patient or a small group of patients (from a specific geographical location) with gluten proteins derived from a wheat genotype, it is expected either to see a reaction (monitored by the production of interferon gamma) or no apparent effect. But in the latter case it does not mean that the wheat genotype is non-toxic to all celiac patients" (3). Since different proteins or protein fractions (peptides) are recognized by different celiac patients' immune systems, there is an enormous number of peptides and proteins that are potentially toxic to at least some people with celiac disease. Extrapolating from that point, people with non celiac gluten sensitivity may well be reacting to any of the proteins or derivative peptides from any of the multitudinous variants of wheat.
    Mr. Specter also makes the claim that: "Humans have been eating wheat, and the gluten in it, for at least ten thousand years." Yet the geneticist, Dr. Martin Richards, and his colleagues report that about three quarters of Europeans are descendants of hunter-gatherers, rather than the early farmers from the Levant (4). So a large majority of people of European descent have not been eating cereal grains for more than 10,000 years. Just how long they have been consuming them depends on where they lived in Europe, which may explain the variability in the frequency of celiac disease across Europe. It is worthy of note that incidence of celiac disease is particularly increased in Scandanavia, Scotland, and Ireland, where climate and topography combined to make cereal grain cultivation more difficult. Thus, one might reasonably interpret this to suggest that these populations experienced limited past exposure to these grains. It is only with modern transportation systems, combined with the abundant excesses of wheat made possible by the work of Dr. Norman Borlaug and many others, in addition to the erroneous belief that wheat is a healthy food, that we now have almost worldwide over-consumption of gluten grains. Increased consumption has led to the increased frequency of celiac disease in these relatively grain-naive populations.
    Much of the rest of the world's populations have only recently begun to eat these grains. Even in the lowlands of England, where grain cultivation is relatively easy and successful, these grains have only been there for the about the last 5,000 years. Worldwide exposure to these grains varies somewhere between several thousands of years to less than 100 years. And what data supports the notion that even 10,000 years is sufficient time for humans to make the complex adaptation to eating them? Dr. Marlene Zuk has implicitly made such a claim, through reporting on much more rapid adaptations to adult consumption of dairy products (5). However, since we are mammals, and are almost universally able to consume human milk as infants, the adaptation required for the digestion of lactose into adulthood is, comparatively speaking, quite minor. Still, more than two thirds of the world's populations are unable to do so. Mr. Specter's resistance to recognizing gluten as a dietary hazard appears to be rooted in bias, rather than a thoughtful examination of the relevant data.
    It also appears that Mr. Specter either failed to learn, or failed to mention, that humans do not have the necessary complement of digestive enzymes needed to break some of the bonds between amino acids in the storage proteins of gluten grains, so we can fully digest them (6). Surely, if we were fully adapted to eating them, we should be able to digest these proteins.
    Nonetheless, Mr. Specter repeatedly disparages and dismisses the disease entity of non-celiac gluten sensitivity, and goes on to say: "The most obvious question is also the most difficult to answer: How could gluten, present in a staple food that has sustained humanity for thousands of years, have suddenly become so threatening?" Of course, this question is only difficult to answer if one ignores the many genetic manipulations of gluten grains and a substantial body of medical research into a variety of human ailments.
    For instance, Dr. Curtis Dohan and his colleagues were the first to publish a report on the connection between some cases of schizophrenia and gluten grains titled "Relapsed schizophrenics: more rapid improvement on a milk- and cereal-free diet" in 1969 (7). This research was conducted in a locked psychiatric ward. Similarly, seven years later, Singh and Kay followed with publication of an affirming research report that, using a different study design, identified wheat as a pathogenic factor in some cases of schizophrenia (8). This work was also conducted in a locked ward where total control of the patients' food intake could be controlled. Further, neither of these reports asserted a connection between celiac disease and schizophrenia. Over the following two decades, several reports, based on sloppy, poorly designed research, were published in the medical literature, and the notion that gluten grains could be a factor in schizophrenia was quickly forgotten. Mr. Specter would have been pleased with these latter reports. Another critic of Dr. Dohan's work, Dr. Donald Kasarda, a cereal scientist at the USDA, was quite happy to make statements such as: "Dohan wasn't much of a scientist" (9). Yet it was this same individual, Don Kasarda, whose name appeared as one of the authors of a report that asserted that a subset of schizophrenic patients mount a novel immune reaction against gluten (10). Dr. Dohan and his colleagues discovered a disease process, and an effective treatment for it, forty years ahead of the group that Dr. Kasarda worked with. Yet the earlier work was unscientific—until the publication of the work led by Dr. Samaroo, with contributions from Dr. Kasarda. Did Dr. Dohan suddenly become competent? Or is there another, more reasonable explanation? I don't understand the contradictions here.
    I'm also struggling to understand Mr. Specter's quoting Dr. Kasarda in his attack on non celiac gluten sensitivity. After all, Dr. Kasarda was one of the authors who published the report of non celiac gluten sensitivity in a subset of schizophrenic patients.
    On another front, Dr. Marios Hadjivassiliou and colleagues have been reporting, over the last twenty years, on celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity in connection with a variety of neurological diseases. These include depression, cerebral palsy, neurological dysfunction, alcohol induced cerebellar degeneration that results in gluten sensitivity, ataxia, ganglionopathy, a gluten induced condition that mimicks amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, inflammatory myopathy, chorea, headaches, balance disturbances, and neuromuscular disorders. They have also reported that antibodies against one of the protein families in gluten are found in the brain (IgG class anti-gliadin antibodies) and they also attack brain tissues (11). Others have reported connections between gluten and seizure disorders in non-celiac gluten sensitivity (12), and cerebral calcifications with seizures (13). Further, several forms of gluten induced brain damage have been reported in the context of celiac disease, which suggests a similar dynamic for those with non-celiac gluten sensitivity and brain damage. Gluten induced brain disorders include headache/migraine, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, epileptic seizures, mental retardation, cerebellar ataxia and behavior disorders (14) in the context of celiac disease. Any and all of these may also suggest a similar dynamic for those with NCGS.
    I have worked with learning disabled students who have shown remarkable recoveries on a gluten-free diet, similar to those described by Alexandra Blair, in her 2003 Times article about dyslexic children who improved enormously on a gluten-free diet (15). Unfortunately, these data were not published in the peer reviewed literature, so they are unlikely to persuade researchers to investigate this matter further. Nonetheless, given the data on gluten's impact on neurological and brain tissues, it does seem very possible that many learning disabilities are, at least partly, the result of non-celiac gluten sensitivity, and that they may benefit from gluten avoidance. Time and space limitations prevent me from exploring the research that identifies the psychoactive properties of protein fractions in wheat, first identified by Christine Zioudrou et al, in her 1979 publication (16), or the Hudson and colleagues' report in 1976 showing that a single subgroup of gluten proteins, called gliadins, are toxic to any of a wide variety of human cells (17). Yet Mr. Specter, calling it "gluten anxiety" would have us dismiss all of this and much, much, more peer reviewed research that identifies gluten as toxic to many people who do not have celiac disease.
    It has never been clear to me why people such as Mr. Specter are quite willing to attack new ideas and discoveries that others have made on their quest for improved health. The attackers seem to want to mock those of us who have found an answer for ourselves. He interviewed several people, whom he quoted in his article, who were just convinced that they felt better when avoiding gluten. Mr. Specter derides those gluten sensitive individuals who were generous enough with their time to allow him to interview them, apparently at the Gluten Free Expo he attended, then compared with "a travelling medicine show". It is difficult to tell whether Mr. Specter was making news or reporting it when he interviewed these people.
    Please recall the fall issue of the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity, in which I explored the flaws of the research by Dr. Biesiekierski and colleagues in Australia (18). Mr. Specter cites Professor Gibson, one of the authors of the same study, as one of his sources for discrediting the notion of non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Mr. Specter goes on to present himself as having a superior insight into the issue of non-celiac gluten sensitivity, attacking Dr. William Davis, cardiologist and author of the popular book, Wheat Belly (19), and Dr. David Perlmutter, a neurologist and author of the similarly popular book, Grain Brain (20). Are we to ignore the now thousands of researchers whose peer reviewed reports are now characterizing non-celiac gluten sensitivity as a disease entity? And should we ignore the scores of popular books asserting the same thing? Or should we ignore Mr. Specter and the flawed research from Australia? I know what I'm going to do.
    Sources:
    Specter M. Against the Grain. The New Yorker. Nov 3, 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norman_Borlaug Adams S. Discussion with Assistant Research Professor Sachin Rustgi on the genetic modification of wheat to make it safe for celiacs. Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. 2014; 13(2): L11-14. Richards M, Macaulay V, Hickey1 E, Vega1 E, Sykes B, Guida V, Rengo C, Sellitto D, Cruciani F, Kivisild T, Villems R, Thomas M, Rychkov S, Rychkov O, Rychkov Y, Gölge M, Dimitro D, Hill E, Bradley D, Romano V, Calì F, Vona G, Demaine S, Papiha S, Triantaphyllidis C, Stefanescu G, Hatina J, Belledi M, Di Rienzo A, Novelletto A, Oppenheim A. Tracing European Founder Lineages in the Near Eastern mtDNA Pool. American Journal of Human Genetics, 2000; 67; 5: 1251–1276. Zuk M. Paleofantasy. Norton, NY: 2013. Kagnoff M. Diagnosing Celiac Disease. CSA/USA, Seattle, WA., Oct. 3-5, 1997. Dohan F, Grassberger J, Lowell F, Johnson H, Arbegast A. "Relapsed schizophrenics: more rapid improvement on a milk- and cereal-free diet" British Journalof Psychiatry. 1969; 115: 595-596. Singh M & Kay S.: 1976, "Wheat gluten as a Pathogenic factor in Schizophrenia" Science. 1976: 191; 401-402. Kasarda, D. private communication. Samaroo D, Dickerson F, Kasarda DD, Green PH, Briani C, Yolken RH, Alaedini A. Novel immune response to gluten in individuals with schizophrenia. Schizophr Res. 2010, May;118(1-3):248-55. Hadjivassiliou M1, Mäki M, Sanders DS, Williamson CA, Grünewald RA, Woodroofe NM, Korponay-Szabó IR.Autoantibody targeting of brain and intestinal transglutaminase in gluten ataxia.Neurology. 2006 Feb 14;66(3):373-7. Bruni O, Dosi C, Luchetti A, Della Corte M, Riccioni A, Battaglia D, Ferri R. An unusual case of drug-resistant epilepsy in a child with non-celiac gluten sensitivity.Seizure. 2014 Sep;23(8):674-6. Calvani M Jr1, Parisi P, Guaitolini C, Parisi G, Paolone G.Latent coeliac disease in a child with epilepsy, cerebral calcifications, drug-induced systemic lupus erythematosus and intestinal folic acid malabsorption associated with impairment of folic acid transport across the blood-brain barrier.Eur J Pediatr. 2001 May;160(5):288-92. Diaconu G, Burlea M, Grigore I, Anton DT, Trandafir LM Celiac disease with neurologic manifestations in children. Rev Med Chir Soc Med Nat Iasi. 2013 Jan-Mar;117(1):88-94.) Blair A. Wheat-free diet gives food for thought. The Times. (of London) June 12, 2004. Zioudrou C, Streaty RA, Klee WA. Opioid peptides derived from food proteins. The exorphins. J Biol Chem. 1979 Apr 10;254(7):2446-9. Hudson, D., Purdham, D., Cornell, H., Rolles, C. Non-specific cytotoxicity of wheat gliadin towards cultured human cells. The Lancet February 14, 1976. 339-341. Biesiekierski JR, Peters SL, Newnham ED, Rosella O, Muir JG, Gibson PR. No effects of gluten in patients with self-reported non-celiac gluten sensitivity after dietary reduction of fermentable, poorly absorbed, short-chain carbohydrates. Gastroenterology. 2013 Aug;145(2):320-8.e1-3. Davis W. Wheat Belly. Rodale Inc. NY, 2011. Perlmutter D. Grain Brain. Little, Brown & co. NY, 2013.

    Dr. Rodney Ford M.D.
    Celiac.com 01/20/2016 - I've got a sore tummy! So many children say they have tummy pain. I see them every day in my clinic. Is this attention seeking or actual pain?
 They often say: "I've got a sore tummy", or "My tummy's sore", or
 "Tummy hurt", or "I've an ache in my tummy" or "Why is my tummy sore?"
    This is such a common complaint that mostly these symptoms are ignored or explained away as attention seeking. However, I have found that the majority of these children with so-called 'chronic abdominal pain' are affected by gluten sensitivity.
    I've got a sore tummy?
    Attention seeking or actual pain? In my experience, these children are in real pain. They need investigation and treatment. They need help for their tummy pains to go away. Yes, sometimes children do mix up the urge to do a poop with a pain (they feel uncomfortable before they do a poop), and it is gone when they poop. Some children mistake hunger as a pain. But most children with recurring "sore tummies" have a different pain. They are sore, in pain and really hurting. Can you imagine how they must feel when their pain is just ignored by their parents?
    Should children be expected to put up with tummy pains?
    Unfortunately, many health professionals and pediatricians are still living with teachings from the past. They refer to the writings of the 1960's. As 50 years ago it was believed that a child complaining about a tummy pain was being "bad" or "naughty". Their discomfort and pain was dismissed as "nothing serious" and told "they'll grow out of it" (the authors of these books were John Apsley "Child Development" and Professor Ronald Illingworth "The Development of the Infant and Young Child: Normal and Abnormal").
    I totally disagree with them. Long ago when they wrote their books, they did not have any blood tests available to diagnose gluten-related disorders; nor did they have any knowledge about gluten or celiac disease; nor was the role of food allergy understood. Consequently, most common symptoms, including chronic tummy pains, were simply attributed to "the state of being a child"!
    How many symptoms do you need to have? How severe do your symptoms have to be? How sick do you need to be? – before anyone will take your illness seriously? Why should we ignore a distressed child? Why should they be told "you will grow out of it"?
    These children have real pains. These children warrant serious attention. These children need help and understanding for their symptoms. Some of these children have unrecognized gastric reflux symptoms; some have celiac disease; some have Helicobacter pylori infection; some have chronic constipation; some have food intolerances; and many have gluten sensitivity/ intolerance.
    So what do I do in my clinic? Well I request gluten and celiac blood tests for ALL of these children who come and see me with tummy upset. To my surprise (I started this type of testing over 20 years ago), most of these sore-tummy-children have high levels of Anti-Gliadin-Antibody (AGA). When they strictly avoid gluten and go onto a gluten-zero diet—most get completely better. Their tummy pains go away, and often their parents report better mood and energy. Also better appetite and better eating.
    For instance:
    "Thanks for the blood results. A month ago, as soon as I got the first lot of blood results back, I took Mark off gluten all together (as you recommended). There has been a big improvement in him sleeping and he seems a lot happier. I haven't been giving him the reflux medication (Losec) for a good few weeks now: I had upped his dose to two pills a day but there was no improvement until I took him off gluten. So it must of been gluten upsetting his tummy. So at this stage we won't need a follow up appointment as with my family history we are pretty clued up with it all. Thanks for your help sorting Mark, it's greatly appreciated." Mum.
    Please don't just ignore them—please test and treat them! Please do not dismiss what your child is telling you: you may be able to help them. They might have a gluten-related disorder. They are not "attention seeking" they are in actual pain.

    See "The Gluten Syndrome" for more details. Also see Dr Rodney Ford's latest Kindle book: "Gluten-Related Disorder: Sick? Tired? Grumpy?" (www.GlutenrelatedDisorder.com).

    Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.
    Celiac.com 01/26/2016 - One part of our natural protection from the microbes and toxins in our environment is the innate part of our immune systems. This includes everything from our skin, to the mucous we produce in various tissues which engulfs unwanted or harmful particles, isolating them and ultimately expelling them from the body in fecal matter and mucous, such as from our sinuses. While our immune systems have other components, it is the innate system that provides most of our protection from the world outside our bodies. The intestinal mucosa is very much a part of this system. Thus, since Hollon et al found that "Increased intestinal permeability after gliadin exposure occurs in all individuals" (1), there should be little doubt that humans are not well adapted to consuming these storage proteins from wheat, or gliadin's near relatives from rye and barley. Anyone eating these grains is opening a portal into their bloodstreams so toxins, microbes, along with undigested and partly digested proteins can enter their circulation. Without gliadin's impact, these various substances would probably not have entered the bloodstream and would have been wasted with feces.
    Just as few of us would ever consider putting fecal matter on an open wound, neither would we knowingly introduce this same material into the bloodstream through the intestinal wall. Yet, that is the net effect of humans consuming gluten grains. We are giving microbes access to our circulation. These harmful substances may be destroyed by other parts of our immune systems. Or perhaps we will develop episodic or chronic inflammation, leading to vascular damage where plaques can accumulate to cause atherosclerosis. Or the inflammation may use up available serotonin and its precursor, tryptophan, leading to depression. Or this they may cause one of the many other forms of damage that can be induced by inflammation. Or perhaps these infectious agents will manifest in other ailments, the causes of which will often remain obscure, as they degrade our health. Just one example of this risk can be found in a recent report in which antibiotic resistant staph infections were detected in 13% of pasteurized milk samples, and in 75% of raw milk samples (2). The acid in our stomachs, another part of the innate immune system, may provide some protection against this hazard. 

    On the other hand, microbes that have gained entrance into the circulation have also been implicated in some cases of arthritis, where the infectious agent binds to proteins in synovial fluid. Selective antibodies then target these complexes, causing damage to both the invader and the self tissues (3, 4).
    Toxins, especially those from insecticides and other chemicals likely to be found in or on our food supply are also cause for concern. Although most cases of organophosphate insecticide poisoning were the result of suicide attempts, these substances are widely used on a variety of food crops, and can be very dangerous (5). After all, both herbicides and pesticides are designed to kill small organisms. Because of our size, we may require more of these substances to get the job done but we, too, are organisms.
    One component of such substances is inorganic arsenic, which can also be found in natural rock deposits, some wood preservatives, rice, and sea foods, any or all of which can find its way to our bloodstreams (7) especially if we consume gluten grains. Of particular concern is that rice is often a staple of the gluten-free diet and it has been shown to have a strong affinity for inorganic arsenic, which "is a chronic, non-threshold carcinogen" (7). Thus, unlike smoking tobacco, even the smallest dose can result in cancer. Further, there are many areas of the United States where the groundwater is significantly contaminated with arsenic (8). Either drinking such water or excessive dietary reliance on rice grown in such a contaminated area can result in arsenic poisoning, as reported by Signes-Pastor et al (7) in a housewife in Saudi Arabia, who had celiac disease and relied heavily on rice. These authors first suspected dietary non-compliance until urine tests revealed an arsenic concentration at 46 times the highest value of the normal range (7). Her symptoms included: "progressive fatigue, profound watery diarrhea (12 times/d), palpitation, dry mouth, poor appetite, poor taste, sleeplessness, impaired concentration, and short-term memory" (7).

    Proteins from outside our bodies are eschewed by our selective immune systems, identifying them as foreign, and mount an attack against these "aliens". So any undigested proteins from the foods we eat, if they arrive in our bloodstream, are going to result in the mobilization of antibodies aimed at the destruction of these proteins. This sounds like a process for developing an allergic response against common foods.
    However, some proteins are worse than others. Gliadin, for instance, has long been recognized as harmful to many human cells (9). Humans also lack the necessary enzymes to fully digest it (10). Thus, after gliadin has caused increased zonulin production, leading to increased intestinal permeability, it can enter the bloodstream and travel to various tissues and organs where this undigested or partly digested family of proteins will induce one or more of their range of damaging impacts on the cells each molecule contacts. Dolfini et al have also reported that gliadin "induces an imbalance in the antioxidative mechanism of cells" (11) and it wreaks havoc on human cells by changing their shape, structure, and reducing their viability, as well as inhibiting enzyme production within the cell and/or inducing cell death (11).
    Since some humans have been consuming these grains for more than 10,000 years, one might expect that we would have evolved a digestive tract that could neutralize this threat to our wellness. Unfortunately, the issue isn't that simple. Only a small segment of the human population started cultivating gluten grains so long ago. The early development of this agriculture was also very localized and episodic. It would begin in one area then, for some unknown reason, the fields would be abandoned after some period of time. Then it would (excuse the pun) crop up in another, nearby area of the Fertile Crescent (what is now parts of Iraq, Iran, Kuwait, Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Palestine, Israel, and Egypt). The net result was that it took some time before cereal agriculture was a thriving concern. This may be explained by the illnesses that are reflected in the bones of those early farmers (11). Gluten grains appear to have taken a much greater toll on their health than it does on us now, so some adaptation has probably occurred. Nonetheless, once grain cultivation got a good start, it spread fairly quickly across Europe, arriving in England by about 5,000 years ago.
    Populations living in environments that were not conducive to grain cultivation, either due to climate or soil conditions would wait much longer to incorporate gluten grains as a staple in their diets. Modern transportation systems were required to bring this crippling food to some doorsteps in Scandanavia, parts of Scotland and Ireland, and many other such environments throughout Europe. However, even in those halcyon days when the sun never set on the British Empire, Europeans really weren't the only people on the planet. They may have behaved as if they were, but that's an issue for another discussion. In the meantime, the bulk of the world's population had not eaten gluten grains until much more recently, when Europeans "shared" these grains almost everywhere they traveled. Most of the populations these Europeans met during their travels had also missed out on the many European plagues, including bubonic plague, smallpox, and typhoid fever, as well as the filthy living conditions that were common in Europe. These conditions had selected only those with the most vigorous immune systems to carry on as Europeans. When gifts such as smallpox-infected blankets were given to natives, these naive populations succumbed, in large numbers.
    Further, only a small percentage of these naive populations who were very recently introduced to gluten were developing celiac disease. For instance, only about 5.6% of Saharawi children of Northern Africa had developed celiac disease when tested by Dr. Catassi and colleagues some 50 years or so after they had begun to eat gluten (12).
    European "explorers" probably didn't really notice such illnesses among their grain-naive hosts. Nobody had the technology or the medical understanding to identify celiac disease or the many neurological ailments that gluten causes anyway. Many of us still deal with deep wells of medical ignorance, in the context of a very modern medical system, when it comes to our disease, so how could we expect anything more from those sea-faring Europeans of four or five centuries ago?
    Perhaps those gluten derived opioids probably felt pretty good to people who tried gluten. Whatever the reason, the rest of the world seems to have adopted Europe's dietary choices, pursuing the "comfort" of gluten grains while developing myriad forms of autoimmune disease, neurological dysfunction, gastrointestinal complaint, and a variety of other ailments. And most of the people I encounter would rather deny the health risks than give up donuts, cake, pie, and toast (13).
    Note: I'm proud to announce that I've been given the privilege of reviewing a new book that will be published early next year, under the Touchstone imprint, by Simon and Schuster. I will be writing about some interesting new insights this exciting book offers into the world of gluten sensitivity in the next issue of the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.
    Sources:
    Hollon J, Puppa EL, Greenwald B, Goldberg E, Guerrerio A, Fasano A. Effect of Gliadin on Permeability of Intestinal Biopsy Explants from Celiac Disease Patients and Patients with Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity. Nutrients 2015, 7, 1565-1576. Akindolire MA, Babalola OO, and Ateba CN. Detection of Antibiotic Resistant Staphylococcus aureus from Milk: A Public Health Implication. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 10254-10275. Li S, Yu Y, Koehn celiac disease, Zhang Z, Su K. Galectins in the Pathogenesis of Rheumatoid Arthritis. J Clin Cell Immunol. 2013 Sep 30;4(5). Cordain L, Toohey L, Smith MJ, Hickey MS. Modulation of immune function by dietary lectins in rheumatoid arthritis. Br J Nutr. 2000 Mar;83(3):207-17. Coskun R, Gundogan K, Sezgin GC, Topaloglu US, Hebbar G, Guven M, Sungur M. A retrospective review of intensive care management of organophosphate insecticide poisoning: Single center experience. Niger J Clin Pract. 2015 Sep-Oct;18(5):644-50. Hasanato RM, Almomen AM. Unusual presentation of arsenic poisoning in a case of celiac disease. Ann Saudi Med. 2015 Mar-Apr;35(2):165-7. Signes-Pastor AJ, Carey M, Meharg AA. Inorganic arsenic in rice-based products for infants and young children. Food Chem. 2016 Jan 15;191:128-34. United States Geological Survey. 2005. Arsenic in ground water in the United States. http://water.usgs.gov/nawqa/trace/arsenic/ Last Modified: Thursday, 17-Nov-2011 Hudson DA, Purdham DR, Cornell HJ, Rolles CJ. Non specific cytotoxicity of wheat gliadin components towards cultured human cells. Lancet 1976; 1: 339-341. Kagnoff M. Private communication. 2005 Dolfini E, Elli L, Roncoroni L, Costa B, Colleoni MP, Lorusso V, Ramponi S,Braidotti P, Ferrero S, Falini ML, Bardella MT. Damaging effects of gliadin on three-dimensional cell culture model. World J Gastroenterol. 2005 Oct 14;11(38):5973-7. Rätsch IM, Catassi C. Coeliac disease: a potentially treatable health problem of Saharawi refugee children. Bull World Health Organ. 2001;79(6):541-5. Cordain L. Cereal grains: humanity's double-edged sword. World Rev Nutr Diet. 1999;84:19-73.

    Betty Wedman-St Louis, PhD, RD
    Celiac.com 06/16/2016 - Do you realize that metabolic and emotional stress, hormonal imbalance and food sensitivities all impact digestion? Many individuals believe that once they stop eating gluten, digestive disorders will disappear. Nothing could be further from the truth as we take a closer look at gastroenterology and the link between the gut and brain.
    The adult gut has between 10 trillion and 100 trillion bacteria that make up the microbiome or surface of the intestines. The goal for digestive wellness is to be sure that there are more GOOD bacteria than BAD bacteria in the microbiome. Food choices, antibiotic use and lifestyle play an important part in creating that balance. Endocrine disrupting chemicals in plastics, along with artificial sweeteners all influence the bacteria or microbiome levels.
    The bacteria content of the gut begins at birth. A vaginal delivery results in a microbiome from the mother while a cesarean section produces a microbiome from everyone who handles the infant. Gut bacteria levels are also influenced by breast feeding versus the use of infant formula.
    Diets deficient in fruits and vegetables mean less antioxidants are consumed so free radicals can destroy digestive and immune function. In addition, fruits and vegetables provide fiber for bacteria to grow on. Current research from the Journal of Clinical Nutrition indicates high fiber diets yield more bacteroides bacteria growth that helps control body weight. Low fiber diets result in more firmicute bacteria which produces weight gain and can lead to obesity.
    Microbiological safety in fresh produce continues to gain prominence in the media. Fresh cut, RTE (ready to eat) produce in convenient packages leads the way in food safety recalls. Fruits and vegetables are prone to microbial contamination from irrigation water, soil, fertilizers, insects, animal feces and field workers during pre-harvest processing. After harvest, the washing and sanitation procedures lack oversight. Remember to wash all raw fruits and vegetables to minimize food poisoning potential.
    Listeria monocytogenes is one of the leading causes of death from food borne illness. It is found in raw milk, cheese, and packaged deli meats. Flu-like symptoms can last days to weeks, and in pregnant women listeria infection can lead to miscarriage.
    Noroviruses make the news regularly, especially on cruise ships. Common food sources include raw produce and shellfish such as clams, mussels, scallops and oysters. Symptoms begin as early s 12 hours after ingestion and the malaise disappears 3 to 4 days later.
    Salmonella continues to plague many with chills, nausea, joint pain and headaches beginning 12 hours post ingestion. Eggs, poultry and raw produce are major sources of salmonella.
    Probiotics are an important addition to the celiac diet for balancing the bacteria levels in the GI tract. They should be taken WITH food to reduce the degradation in an acid stomach. Research has shown that urinary tract and vaginal infections have an improved management rate when lactobacillus and bifidobacterium multi-species probiotics are used.
    Probiotics are live bacteria which have been shown to reduce inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract. They also reduce intestinal permeability and influence serotonin and melatonin production in the gut.
    So since the human gut contains 10 times more bacteria than all the human cells in our body, keeping a healthy balance of bacteria in the gut is critical for digestive wellness.

    Nicole Vela
    Celiac.com 08/02/2016 - One thing I have noticed since becoming a parent is how every place we go there are treats and candy. Even cashiers hand out candy at the checkout. Food is everywhere. Our kids are constantly being bombarded with sugary baked goods and salty snacks.
    Wow, how times have changed! When I was a kid, and yes, my saying that makes me sound ancient, but it was only the 80's...back then we were sent outside in the morning and all of the neighborhood kids convened in someone's backyard. We went home for lunch and moms certainly did not hand out treats, especially not butterfly shaped waffles or any of the other Pinterest-inspired foods out there. We considered ourselves pretty lucky if someone had Freeze Pops in their house. If you are raising a child gluten-free, you know how much of a challenge it is that everything revolves around food.
    The diagnosis of celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity is a huge eye opener for many. I think one of the hardest things for a family starting a gluten-free diet is how different our diet is from the way most people cook and eat. Since the 1950's we have morphed from TV dinners to buying entire meals from the grocery store deli, and our breads, cakes, and rolls from the bakery. And we've moved from a dinner out being a rare treat to the drive-thru being the norm for many families. Some parents never learned how to cook themselves, so it can be quite a shock to go from a world of just picking up dinner at the drive-thru or the deli, to a world of cooking from scratch at home. I know. I was a processed foods kid, and now I am definitely a "semi-homemade" cook.
    Going gluten-free can be overwhelming at first. It will get easier. Here are a few tips and resources for raising a gluten-free child.
    Take advantage of the internet and your smart phone. I love subscribing to digital gluten-free magazines, finding new recipes and reading books from my Kindle App. Make grocery shopping easy by using The Gluten-Free Grocery Guide by Triumph Dining (1). They have produced an app that tells you which foods are gluten-free at the grocery store. The app features popular brands and even includes store brands. They have done the research for you by calling brands and manufacturers to create this resource. I know how hard it is getting through the grocery store with kids in tow. It needs to be as easy as possible!
    Know that you are not alone. There are many other parents facing the same obstacles as you. Surround yourself with support. R.O.C.K, Raising Our Celiac Kids (2) is a support group that can help you with the challenges ahead. Two other support groups you may look into are The Gluten Intolerance Group (3) and Celiac Sprue Association (4), while these are not groups for kids, they still provide valuable help and information.
    Talk to family and friends about the seriousness of your child's needs. A lot of people don't understand how celiac disease or gluten sensitivity effects someone. Educate them. Make it clear that foods can't just be given to your kid, even a food that one may think of as gluten-free. Tell them about hidden sources of gluten. Let them know why a gluten-free menu at a restaurant may not actually be gluten-free. If your child spends a lot of time with a relative go over items in their home, like their toaster, that may be sources of cross contamination.
    Teach your child the effects of cheating on their diet can do. Short term and long term. There are going to be many times of temptation. They are eventually going to be teenagers and have their own transportation and money. They need to be able to make smart choices as young adults.
    Be prepared for class parties and classmates' birthdays. I suggest making it easier for yourself by giving a good supply of treats to your kid's teacher and having a good store of treats at home. Some yummy pre-packaged treats are Jelly Belly Snack Packs, Enjoy Life Cookies, and Lucy's Cookies. These are great choices for multiple food sensitivities. I also recommend packing snacks for around town, play dates, and after school activities. Having healthy gluten-free snacks on hand is important for when there may not be any allergy-friendly snacks available.
    I try to stick to as many natural foods as possible, but occasionally, I like a treat or an easy meal. Thanks to the huge growth in gluten-free consumers there are a ton of food choices available. Gluten-free pizza, mac 'n' cheese, chicken tenders, cookies, pasta, even gluten-free toaster pastries. If you live in a rural area, with stores that don't carry a lot of gluten-free items, take advantage of online shopping. I like the ease of shopping from Amazon, Vitacost and The Gluten-Free Mall. As a busy mom I love that I can get items delivered to my door.
    Get your kids in the kitchen. Teaching your kids to cook is an invaluable resource that will serve them life-long. Learning how to make a meal from whole natural foods can be fun and it teaches them how to eat a healthy diet. You can do this yourself or there are a lot of kids' cooking programs at local culinary centers, grocery stores, and community centers.
    Kids will adapt and adjust. If they are older and have been eating gluten-containing foods their whole lives, it will be more difficult because their palates have been formed. Try to ease the transition by having them go grocery shopping with you so they can learn what is still available to them, and then do something fun like chocolate gluten-free waffles. Or pick up some gluten-free ice cream cones and ice cream. Let them know they don't have to give up everything. Having a positive attitude is essential. Children will model what you show them.
    References:
    http://www.triumphdining.com/glutenfree/apps.php https://www.celiac.com/articles/563/1/ROCK-Raising-Our-Celiac-Kids---National-Celiac-Disease-Support-Group/Page1.html https://www.gluten.net/gluten-intolerance-group-branch-offices/ 4.http://www.csaceliacs.info/find.jsp

  • Recent Articles

    Tammy Rhodes
    Celiac.com 04/24/2018 - Did you know in 2017 alone, the United States had OVER TENS OF THOUSANDS of people evacuate their homes due to natural disasters such as fires, floods, hurricanes, tornadoes and tsunamis? Most evacuation sites are not equipped to feed your family the safe gluten free foods that are required to stay healthy.  Are you prepared in case of an emergency? Do you have your Gluten Free Emergency Food Bag ready to grab and go?  
    I have already lived through two natural disasters. Neither of which I ever want to experience again, but they taught me a very valuable lesson, which is why I created a Gluten Free Emergency Food Bag (see link below). Here’s my story. If you’ve ever lived in or visited the Los Angeles area, you’re probably familiar with the Santa Ana winds and how bitter sweet they are. Sweet for cleaning the air and leaving the skies a brilliant crystal blue, and bitter for the power outages and potential brush fires that might ensue.  It was one of those bitter nights where the Santa Ana winds were howling, and we had subsequently lost our power. We had to drive over an hour just to find a restaurant so we could eat dinner. I remember vividly seeing the glow of a brush fire on the upper hillside of the San Gabriel Mountains, a good distance from our neighborhood. I really didn’t think much of it, given that it seemed so far from where we lived, and I was hungry! After we ate, we headed back home to a very dark house and called it a night. 
    That’s where the story takes a dangerous turn….about 3:15am. I awoke to the TV blaring loudly, along with the lights shining brightly. Our power was back on! I proceeded to walk throughout the house turning everything off at exactly the same time our neighbor, who was told to evacuate our street, saw me through our window, assuming I knew that our hillside was ablaze with flames. Flames that were shooting 50 feet into the air. I went back to bed and fell fast asleep. The fire department was assured we had left because our house was dark and quiet again. Two hours had passed.  I suddenly awoke to screams coming from a family member yelling, “fire, fire, fire”! Flames were shooting straight up into the sky, just blocks from our house. We lived on a private drive with only one way in and one way out.  The entrance to our street was full of smoke and the fire fighters were doing their best to save our neighbors homes. We literally had enough time to grab our dogs, pile into the car, and speed to safety. As we were coming down our street, fire trucks passed us with sirens blaring, and I wondered if I would ever see my house and our possessions ever again. Where do we go? Who do we turn to? Are shelters a safe option? 
    When our daughter was almost three years old, we left the West Coast and relocated to Northern Illinois. A place where severe weather is a common occurrence. Since the age of two, I noticed that my daughter appeared gaunt, had an incredibly distended belly, along with gas, stomach pain, low weight, slow growth, unusual looking stool, and a dislike for pizza, hotdog buns, crackers, Toast, etc. The phone call from our doctor overwhelmed me.  She was diagnosed with Celiac Disease. I broke down into tears sobbing. What am I going to feed my child? Gluten is everywhere.
    After being scoped at Children's Hospital of Chicago, and my daughters Celiac Disease officially confirmed, I worried about her getting all the nutrients her under nourished body so desperately needed. I already knew she had a peanut allergy from blood tests, but just assumed she would be safe with other nuts. I was so horribly wrong. After feeding her a small bite of a pistachio, which she immediately spit out, nuts would become her enemy. Her anaphylactic reaction came within minutes of taking a bite of that pistachio. She was complaining of horrible stomach cramps when the vomiting set in. She then went limp and starting welting. We called 911.
    Now we never leave home without our Epipens and our gluten free food supplies. We analyze every food label. We are hyper vigilant about cross contamination. We are constantly looking for welts and praying for no stomach pain. We are always prepared and on guard. It's just what we do now. Anything to protect our child, our love...like so many other parents out there have to do every moment of ever day!  
    Then, my second brush with a natural disaster happened, without any notice, leaving us once again scrambling to find a safe place to shelter. It was a warm and muggy summer morning, and my husband was away on a business trip leaving my young daughter and me to enjoy our summer day. Our Severe Weather Alert Radio was going off, again, as I continued getting our daughter ready for gymnastics.  Having gotten used to the (what seemed to be daily) “Severe Thunderstorm warning,” I didn’t pay much attention to it. I continued downstairs with my daughter and our dog, when I caught a glimpse out the window of an incredibly black looking cloud. By the time I got downstairs, I saw the cover to our grill literally shoot straight up into the air. Because we didn’t have a fenced in yard, I quickly ran outside and chased the cover, when subsequently, I saw my neighbor’s lawn furniture blow pass me. I quickly realized I made a big mistake going outside. As I ran back inside, I heard debris hitting the front of our home.  Our dog was the first one to the basement door! As we sat huddled in the dark corner of our basement, I was once again thinking where are we going to go if our house is destroyed. I was not prepared, and I should have been. I should have learned my lesson the first time. Once the storm passed, we quickly realized we were without power and most of our trees were destroyed. We were lucky that our house had minimal damage, but that wasn’t true for most of the area surrounding us.  We were without power for five days. We lost most of our food - our gluten free food.
    That is when I knew we had to be prepared. No more winging it. We couldn’t take a chance like that ever again. We were “lucky” one too many times. We were very fortunate that we did not lose our home to the Los Angeles wildfire, and only had minimal damage from the severe storm which hit our home in Illinois.
      
    In 2017 alone, FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) had 137 natural disasters declared within the United States. According to FEMA, around 50% of the United States population isn’t prepared for a natural disaster. These disasters can happen anywhere, anytime and some without notice. It’s hard enough being a parent, let alone being a parent of a gluten free family member. Now, add a natural disaster on top of that. Are you prepared?
    You can find my Gluten Free Emergency Food Bags and other useful products at www.allergynavigator.com.  

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/23/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to learn whether celiac disease patients commonly suffer cognitive impairment at the time they are diagnosed, and to compare their cognitive performance with non-celiac subjects with similar chronic symptoms and to a group of healthy control subjects.
    The research team included G Longarini, P Richly, MP Temprano, AF Costa, H Vázquez, ML Moreno, S Niveloni, P López, E Smecuol, R Mazure, A González, E Mauriño, and JC Bai. They are variously associated with the Small Bowel Section, Department of Medicine, Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital; Neurocience Cognitive and Traslational Institute (INECO), Favaloro Fundation, CONICET, Buenos Aires; the Brain Health Center (CESAL), Quilmes, Argentina; the Research Council, MSAL, CABA; and with the Research Institute, School of Medicine, Universidad del Salvador.
    The team enrolled fifty adults with symptoms and indications of celiac disease in a prospective cohort without regard to the final diagnosis.  At baseline, all individuals underwent cognitive functional and psychological evaluation. The team then compared celiac disease patients with subjects without celiac disease, and with healthy controls matched by sex, age, and education.
    Celiac disease patients had similar cognitive performance and anxiety, but no significant differences in depression scores compared with disease controls.
    A total of thirty-three subjects were diagnosed with celiac disease. Compared with the 26 healthy control subjects, the 17 celiac disease subjects, and the 17 disease control subjects, who mostly had irritable bowel syndrome, showed impaired cognitive performance (P=0.02 and P=0.04, respectively), functional impairment (P<0.01), and higher depression (P<0.01). 
    From their data, the team noted that any abnormal cognitive functions they saw in adults with newly diagnosed celiac disease did not seem not to be a result of the disease itself. 
    Their results indicate that cognitive dysfunction in celiac patients could be related to long-term symptoms from chronic disease, in general.
    Source:
    J Clin Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 1. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0000000000001018.

    Connie Sarros
    Celiac.com 04/21/2018 - Dear Friends and Readers,
    I have been writing articles for Scott Adams since the 2002 Summer Issue of the Scott-Free Press. The Scott-Free Press evolved into the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. I felt honored when Scott asked me ten years ago to contribute to his quarterly journal and it's been a privilege to write articles for his publication ever since.
    Due to personal health reasons and restrictions, I find that I need to retire. My husband and I can no longer travel the country speaking at conferences and to support groups (which we dearly loved to do) nor can I commit to writing more books, articles, or menus. Consequently, I will no longer be contributing articles to the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. 
    My following books will still be available at Amazon.com:
    Gluten-free Cooking for Dummies Student's Vegetarian Cookbook for Dummies Wheat-free Gluten-free Dessert Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Reduced Calorie Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Cookbook for Kids and Busy Adults (revised version) My first book was published in 1996. My journey since then has been incredible. I have met so many in the celiac community and I feel blessed to be able to call you friends. Many of you have told me that I helped to change your life – let me assure you that your kind words, your phone calls, your thoughtful notes, and your feedback throughout the years have had a vital impact on my life, too. Thank you for all of your support through these years.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/20/2018 - A digital media company and a label data company are teaming up to help major manufacturers target, reach and convert their desired shoppers based on dietary needs, such as gluten-free diet. The deal could bring synergy in emerging markets such as the gluten-free and allergen-free markets, which represent major growth sectors in the global food industry. 
    Under the deal, personalized digital media company Catalina will be joining forces with Label Insight. Catalina uses consumer purchases data to target shoppers on a personal base, while Label Insight works with major companies like Kellogg, Betty Crocker, and Pepsi to provide insight on food label data to government, retailers, manufacturers and app developers.
    "Brands with very specific product benefits, gluten-free for example, require precise targeting to efficiently reach and convert their desired shoppers,” says Todd Morris, President of Catalina's Go-to-Market organization, adding that “Catalina offers the only purchase-based targeting solution with this capability.” 
    Label Insight’s clients include food and beverage giants such as Unilever, Ben & Jerry's, Lipton and Hellman’s. Label Insight technology has helped the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) build the sector’s very first scientifically accurate database of food ingredients, health attributes and claims.
    Morris says the joint partnership will allow Catalina to “enhance our dataset and further increase our ability to target shoppers who are currently buying - or have shown intent to buy - in these emerging categories,” including gluten-free, allergen-free, and other free-from foods.
    The deal will likely make for easier, more precise targeting of goods to consumers, and thus provide benefits for manufacturers and retailers looking to better serve their retail food customers, especially in specialty areas like gluten-free and allergen-free foods.
    Source:
    fdfworld.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/19/2018 - Previous genome and linkage studies indicate the existence of a new disease triggering mechanism that involves amino acid metabolism and nutrient sensing signaling pathways. In an effort to determine if amino acids might play a role in the development of celiac disease, a team of researchers recently set out to investigate if plasma amino acid levels differed among children with celiac disease compared with a control group.
     
    The research team included Åsa Torinsson Naluai, Ladan Saadat Vafa, Audur H. Gudjonsdottir, Henrik Arnell, Lars Browaldh, and Daniel Agardh. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Karolinska University Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institute, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Diabetes & Celiac Disease Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; and with the Nathan S Kline Institute in the U.S.A.
    First, the team used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to analyze amino acid levels in fasting plasma samples from 141 children with celiac disease and 129 non-celiac disease controls. They then crafted a general linear model using age and experimental effects as covariates to compare amino acid levels between children with celiac disease and non-celiac control subjects.
    Compared with the control group, seven out of twenty-three children with celiac disease showed elevated levels of the the following amino acids: tryptophan; taurine; glutamic acid; proline; ornithine; alanine; and methionine.
    The significance of the individual amino acids do not survive multiple correction, however, multivariate analyses of the amino acid profile showed significantly altered amino acid levels in children with celiac disease overall and after correction for age, sex and experimental effects.
    This study shows that amino acids can influence inflammation and may play a role in the development of celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764