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    Gluten Grains are a Problematic Food for Humans


    Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2015 Issue - Originally published October 19, 2015


    Image Caption: Image: CC--Image Catalog

    Celiac.com 01/26/2016 - One part of our natural protection from the microbes and toxins in our environment is the innate part of our immune systems. This includes everything from our skin, to the mucous we produce in various tissues which engulfs unwanted or harmful particles, isolating them and ultimately expelling them from the body in fecal matter and mucous, such as from our sinuses. While our immune systems have other components, it is the innate system that provides most of our protection from the world outside our bodies. The intestinal mucosa is very much a part of this system. Thus, since Hollon et al found that "Increased intestinal permeability after gliadin exposure occurs in all individuals" (1), there should be little doubt that humans are not well adapted to consuming these storage proteins from wheat, or gliadin's near relatives from rye and barley. Anyone eating these grains is opening a portal into their bloodstreams so toxins, microbes, along with undigested and partly digested proteins can enter their circulation. Without gliadin's impact, these various substances would probably not have entered the bloodstream and would have been wasted with feces.


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    Just as few of us would ever consider putting fecal matter on an open wound, neither would we knowingly introduce this same material into the bloodstream through the intestinal wall. Yet, that is the net effect of humans consuming gluten grains. We are giving microbes access to our circulation. These harmful substances may be destroyed by other parts of our immune systems. Or perhaps we will develop episodic or chronic inflammation, leading to vascular damage where plaques can accumulate to cause atherosclerosis. Or the inflammation may use up available serotonin and its precursor, tryptophan, leading to depression. Or this they may cause one of the many other forms of damage that can be induced by inflammation. Or perhaps these infectious agents will manifest in other ailments, the causes of which will often remain obscure, as they degrade our health. Just one example of this risk can be found in a recent report in which antibiotic resistant staph infections were detected in 13% of pasteurized milk samples, and in 75% of raw milk samples (2). The acid in our stomachs, another part of the innate immune system, may provide some protection against this hazard. 


    On the other hand, microbes that have gained entrance into the circulation have also been implicated in some cases of arthritis, where the infectious agent binds to proteins in synovial fluid. Selective antibodies then target these complexes, causing damage to both the invader and the self tissues (3, 4).

    Toxins, especially those from insecticides and other chemicals likely to be found in or on our food supply are also cause for concern. Although most cases of organophosphate insecticide poisoning were the result of suicide attempts, these substances are widely used on a variety of food crops, and can be very dangerous (5). After all, both herbicides and pesticides are designed to kill small organisms. Because of our size, we may require more of these substances to get the job done but we, too, are organisms.

    One component of such substances is inorganic arsenic, which can also be found in natural rock deposits, some wood preservatives, rice, and sea foods, any or all of which can find its way to our bloodstreams (7) especially if we consume gluten grains. Of particular concern is that rice is often a staple of the gluten-free diet and it has been shown to have a strong affinity for inorganic arsenic, which "is a chronic, non-threshold carcinogen" (7). Thus, unlike smoking tobacco, even the smallest dose can result in cancer. Further, there are many areas of the United States where the groundwater is significantly contaminated with arsenic (8). Either drinking such water or excessive dietary reliance on rice grown in such a contaminated area can result in arsenic poisoning, as reported by Signes-Pastor et al (7) in a housewife in Saudi Arabia, who had celiac disease and relied heavily on rice. These authors first suspected dietary non-compliance until urine tests revealed an arsenic concentration at 46 times the highest value of the normal range (7). Her symptoms included: "progressive fatigue, profound watery diarrhea (12 times/d), palpitation, dry mouth, poor appetite, poor taste, sleeplessness, impaired concentration, and short-term memory" (7).

    Proteins from outside our bodies are eschewed by our selective immune systems, identifying them as foreign, and mount an attack against these "aliens". So any undigested proteins from the foods we eat, if they arrive in our bloodstream, are going to result in the mobilization of antibodies aimed at the destruction of these proteins. This sounds like a process for developing an allergic response against common foods.

    However, some proteins are worse than others. Gliadin, for instance, has long been recognized as harmful to many human cells (9). Humans also lack the necessary enzymes to fully digest it (10). Thus, after gliadin has caused increased zonulin production, leading to increased intestinal permeability, it can enter the bloodstream and travel to various tissues and organs where this undigested or partly digested family of proteins will induce one or more of their range of damaging impacts on the cells each molecule contacts. Dolfini et al have also reported that gliadin "induces an imbalance in the antioxidative mechanism of cells" (11) and it wreaks havoc on human cells by changing their shape, structure, and reducing their viability, as well as inhibiting enzyme production within the cell and/or inducing cell death (11).

    Since some humans have been consuming these grains for more than 10,000 years, one might expect that we would have evolved a digestive tract that could neutralize this threat to our wellness. Unfortunately, the issue isn't that simple. Only a small segment of the human population started cultivating gluten grains so long ago. The early development of this agriculture was also very localized and episodic. It would begin in one area then, for some unknown reason, the fields would be abandoned after some period of time. Then it would (excuse the pun) crop up in another, nearby area of the Fertile Crescent (what is now parts of Iraq, Iran, Kuwait, Syria, Lebanon, Jordan, Palestine, Israel, and Egypt). The net result was that it took some time before cereal agriculture was a thriving concern. This may be explained by the illnesses that are reflected in the bones of those early farmers (11). Gluten grains appear to have taken a much greater toll on their health than it does on us now, so some adaptation has probably occurred. Nonetheless, once grain cultivation got a good start, it spread fairly quickly across Europe, arriving in England by about 5,000 years ago.

    Populations living in environments that were not conducive to grain cultivation, either due to climate or soil conditions would wait much longer to incorporate gluten grains as a staple in their diets. Modern transportation systems were required to bring this crippling food to some doorsteps in Scandanavia, parts of Scotland and Ireland, and many other such environments throughout Europe. However, even in those halcyon days when the sun never set on the British Empire, Europeans really weren't the only people on the planet. They may have behaved as if they were, but that's an issue for another discussion. In the meantime, the bulk of the world's population had not eaten gluten grains until much more recently, when Europeans "shared" these grains almost everywhere they traveled. Most of the populations these Europeans met during their travels had also missed out on the many European plagues, including bubonic plague, smallpox, and typhoid fever, as well as the filthy living conditions that were common in Europe. These conditions had selected only those with the most vigorous immune systems to carry on as Europeans. When gifts such as smallpox-infected blankets were given to natives, these naive populations succumbed, in large numbers.

    Further, only a small percentage of these naive populations who were very recently introduced to gluten were developing celiac disease. For instance, only about 5.6% of Saharawi children of Northern Africa had developed celiac disease when tested by Dr. Catassi and colleagues some 50 years or so after they had begun to eat gluten (12).

    European "explorers" probably didn't really notice such illnesses among their grain-naive hosts. Nobody had the technology or the medical understanding to identify celiac disease or the many neurological ailments that gluten causes anyway. Many of us still deal with deep wells of medical ignorance, in the context of a very modern medical system, when it comes to our disease, so how could we expect anything more from those sea-faring Europeans of four or five centuries ago?

    Perhaps those gluten derived opioids probably felt pretty good to people who tried gluten. Whatever the reason, the rest of the world seems to have adopted Europe's dietary choices, pursuing the "comfort" of gluten grains while developing myriad forms of autoimmune disease, neurological dysfunction, gastrointestinal complaint, and a variety of other ailments. And most of the people I encounter would rather deny the health risks than give up donuts, cake, pie, and toast (13).

    Note: I'm proud to announce that I've been given the privilege of reviewing a new book that will be published early next year, under the Touchstone imprint, by Simon and Schuster. I will be writing about some interesting new insights this exciting book offers into the world of gluten sensitivity in the next issue of the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

    Sources:

    1. Hollon J, Puppa EL, Greenwald B, Goldberg E, Guerrerio A, Fasano A. Effect of Gliadin on Permeability of Intestinal Biopsy Explants from Celiac Disease Patients and Patients with Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity. Nutrients 2015, 7, 1565-1576.
    2. Akindolire MA, Babalola OO, and Ateba CN. Detection of Antibiotic Resistant Staphylococcus aureus from Milk: A Public Health Implication. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 10254-10275.
    3. Li S, Yu Y, Koehn celiac disease, Zhang Z, Su K. Galectins in the Pathogenesis of Rheumatoid Arthritis. J Clin Cell Immunol. 2013 Sep 30;4(5).
    4. Cordain L, Toohey L, Smith MJ, Hickey MS. Modulation of immune function by dietary lectins in rheumatoid arthritis. Br J Nutr. 2000 Mar;83(3):207-17.
    5. Coskun R, Gundogan K, Sezgin GC, Topaloglu US, Hebbar G, Guven M, Sungur M. A retrospective review of intensive care management of organophosphate insecticide poisoning: Single center experience. Niger J Clin Pract. 2015 Sep-Oct;18(5):644-50.
    6. Hasanato RM, Almomen AM. Unusual presentation of arsenic poisoning in a case of celiac disease. Ann Saudi Med. 2015 Mar-Apr;35(2):165-7.
    7. Signes-Pastor AJ, Carey M, Meharg AA. Inorganic arsenic in rice-based products for infants and young children. Food Chem. 2016 Jan 15;191:128-34.
    8. United States Geological Survey. 2005. Arsenic in ground water in the United States. http://water.usgs.gov/nawqa/trace/arsenic/ Last Modified: Thursday, 17-Nov-2011
    9. Hudson DA, Purdham DR, Cornell HJ, Rolles CJ. Non specific cytotoxicity of wheat gliadin components towards cultured human cells. Lancet 1976; 1: 339-341.
    10. Kagnoff M. Private communication. 2005
    11. Dolfini E, Elli L, Roncoroni L, Costa B, Colleoni MP, Lorusso V, Ramponi S,Braidotti P, Ferrero S, Falini ML, Bardella MT. Damaging effects of gliadin on three-dimensional cell culture model. World J Gastroenterol. 2005 Oct 14;11(38):5973-7.
    12. Rätsch IM, Catassi C. Coeliac disease: a potentially treatable health problem of Saharawi refugee children. Bull World Health Organ. 2001;79(6):541-5.
    13. Cordain L. Cereal grains: humanity's double-edged sword. World Rev Nutr Diet. 1999;84:19-73.

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  • About Me

    As co-author of "Dangerous Grains" and "Cereal Killers", the study of the impact of gluten continues to be a driving passion in my life. I am fascinated by the way that gluten induces illness and impedes learning while it alters mood, behavior, and a host of other facets of our existence. Sure, the impact of gluten on health is an important issue, but that is only the most obvious area of impact. Mood disturbances, learning disabilities, and the loss of quality of life due to psychiatric and neurological illness are even more tragic than the plethora of physical ailments that are caused or worsened by gluten. The further I go down this rabbit hole, the more I realize that grains are a good food for ruminants - not people. I am a retired school teacher. Over the last decade, I have done some college and university level teaching, but the bulk of my teaching career was spent working with high school students. My Web page is: www.DangerousGrains.com

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    Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.
    Celiac.com 03/09/2016 - Many of us continue to struggle with a wide range of health concerns, digestive complaints, neurological symptoms, and/or apparently unrelated wellness issues such as low energy levels or continuing episodes of brain fog. Yet, we are gluten-free to the best of our ability. Some of us expend inordinate periods of time preparing all our own meals to ensure the strictness of our diets. Yet the symptoms persist or continue to escalate. For many of us, our health care providers are unable to help. They order more and more testing as they seek more and more obscure possible causes for our repeated visits. You may even be one of those people who simply gives up on the medical profession, and either continues to seek answers on your own, or just tries to accept your current, less than optimal state of health. Many of us continue to believe the faulty information in the "Food Pyramid" and "My Plate". These and other such guides erred with respect to our celiac disease, but we continue to accept flawed claims about the health benefits and dietary importance of grain fiber. Thus, while having eliminated gluten grains, we continue to consume other grains for these benefits. Yet, if the authors of My Plate, etc., could be so wrong about the gluten grains, surely all of their claims should be suspect. Or, if we have great faith in them, we should at least examine the evidence that supports their claims.
    We know, by virtue of the celiac's leaky gut, that additional food sensitivities are common among those who were diagnosed as adults. Similarly, those who strayed from careful gluten avoidance will also be likely to have triggered immune reactions to a variety of other food proteins and peptides. Further, Dr. Marios Hadjivassiliou and colleagues have long reported that when there are neurological symptoms that are associated with either celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity, those individuals need to be even more vigilant than most celiacs about avoiding even tiny traces of gluten. Thus, whether you are continuing to experience celiac symptoms, neurological symptoms, or other health problems that may be driven by diet, I have some good news. There is a new kid on the block.
    His name is Peter Osborne, D.C., and he has written an exciting new book about gluten sensitivity and more, much more. Titled No Grain No Pain, Osborne's book brings a breath of fresh air to the many stale controversies that hover over the health issues that are driven or aided by various grains. As the title suggests, his primary focus is on the chronic and acute pain that can be caused by eating various cereal grains. In addition to the gluten grains, he identifies several immune and hormonal pathways and dynamics by which the consumption of storage proteins from other grains can cause pain. Meanwhile, he shows that antibody delivery, via the lymph system, is reliant upon movement and muscle contractions because, unlike blood circulation, we don't have a dedicated organ for pumping lymph. Additionally, he points out that these families of storage proteins bear a striking resemblance to those found in gluten grains and sheds light on them as important forces behind many forms of chronic pain.
    Dr. Osborne's plain language explanation of the differences between selective and innate immune reactions, and how they impact on the protein and peptide sensitivities we develop is really quite impressive. I have never read a clearer, more concise explanation of these two facets of human immune systems and how they can interact when things go awry. He presents a series of compelling case histories that show the very dynamics he identifies as problematic, also explaining exactly what these individuals did to recover from their painful symptoms. And this is the most ingenious facet of his book. Osborne identifies the dynamic, then provides an illustrative case history to show both how and why the ailments developed, and how and why the patient gets well again.
    He also acknowledges that each of us is unique, making such statements as "Never make the assumption that a food is safe or healthy for everyone." That, I think, is the most telling statement in his aptly titled new book: "No Grain No Pain". His explorations touch on the bacteria that populate our intestines, for good or ill, and how grain consumption can alter those populations. He also explores the elegant interplay between various critical vitamins, minerals, bacteria, and macronutrients that is both unique to each of us, and can have a profound impact on each of our immune systems. His discussion of imbalanced intake of omega 3 and omega 6 oils is another important feature of our individuality.
    While excess omega 6 oils will induce inflammation in anyone, and adequate omega 3 oils will counter inflammation in all of us, each of us has her/his own unique capacities for emulsifying, absorbing, and metabolising these fats. Nonetheless, Osborne provides some clear guidelines for balancing our intake of these essential fats toward reducing inflammation. Most of us are currently getting more omega 6 fats than we need, and not enough of the omega 3 fats. That leads to unnecessary inflammation and pain.
    I must admit that I was initially put off by the book's central argument, especially since it was presented before the enormous body of supporting information. After all, there is a limit to how many foods I can stop eating! However, I soon warmed to the topic as I saw that it is not much of a step to eliminate the other grains he identifies as problematic. After all, that still leaves us able to eat many healthful fruits, vegetables, berries, and meats.
    I was also taken by his discussion of what he calls "grainbesity". The explanation of AGEs is, I think, critical to understanding how important these substances are to the extensive damage they can wreak on all parts of the body and brain.
    Similarly, zinc and magnesium, while very important to the proper function of our immune systems, are also critical to managing blood glucose and insulin levels. And unwanted weight gain is often accompanied by deficiencies in these minerals. As we gain weight, our joints are compressed, resulting in joint damage and pain. Weight loss, is the obvious answer, but without these critical minerals, that task may be close to impossible. Further, additional food sensitivities may also be a factor in the vicious, downward, weight-gain spiral.
    Dr. Osborne also explores the broad world of unintended consequences from a variety of over-the-counter and prescribed medications. I was aware that many NSAIDs can cause or increase gut leakage of food proteins and peptides into the bloodstream, resulting in autoimmunity and other damaging dynamics. However, I also learned that Ibuprofen can damage the stomach lining and small intestine. Since vitamin B12 deficiency is common in my family, with many members getting regular shots because their intrinsic factor appears to be compromised, it may be worthwhile looking at their ibuprofen use. Similarly, he examines a variety of dietary deficiencies that can be corrected with supplements, and he provides a host of recipes along with a dietary program that gradually weans the follower off the gluten-free, standard American diet.
    He has a revolutionary, detailed view of the whole field of gluten sensitivity and he assures the reader that if they will just follow his dietary plan for 30 days, she or he is very likely to discover a pathway that will reduce or eliminate their chronic pain.
    On a personal level, many readers are already aware of the substantial relief that my mother got just from avoiding gluten grains. She was able to stop taking morphine, go back golfing, and lose one hundred pounds. (Accumulating that much extra weight is no small feat on a woman who wasn't quite five feet tall.) She lived a much longer life than was likely more than twenty years ago. Yet, when she arrived at the first of two seniors' homes, to live in what is called "assisted living", her dietary needs were not met. In theory, a gluten-free diet was available. In reality, she watched while others consumed tasty treats for dessert, while she was given the same old fruit plate, or Jello. Predictably, she started to cheat. By six years ago, she was frequently eating gluten-laden desserts. In an attempt to "start over" and be closer to my wife and I, she and my step-father moved to another assisted living facility. I spoke with the chef before they agreed to move. He assured me that he would address my parents' needs.
    Yet after he had seen my mom cheat a few times, he stopped providing for her gluten-free diet, as he said that if she wasn't making the effort, why should he? I was sympathetic to his point of view until I discussed it with the community health nurse. She said that "We don't stop accommodating diabetics' needs just because they falter on their diet. Why should he do that with her?" Having thought about it, I returned to the chef and pressed him to provide her with gluten-free food. He promised to do so. It was not long before my mother was lapsing into more and more pain. I then spoke with the manager of the facility. She agreed to provide mom with gluten-free food.
    By two years ago, mom's mind was going, she couldn't remember what foods had gluten in them, and she forgot to ask for gluten-free alternatives. She steadily re-gained about fifty pounds. Concerned about her weight and her pain, she wanted to return to the diet, but was simply unable to do so. She would forget and eat treats with her neighbors. I watched her eyes light up when one of them brought yet another such deadly treat to share with her.
    My own experience is that pain is very forgettable. I doubt that women would give birth to a second child, in this day of available birth control, if pain weren't so easy to forget. It is only when I revisit a particular source of pain that I recall its intensity. I suspect that is true for my mom as well. If so, it is my hope that Dr. Osborne's book, and all the subsequent publications about dietary grain and the pain it causes will enlighten enough folks that cooperation at such extended care facilities will become easier to enlist.
    In the meantime, I find myself reading every book on the subject of celiac disease and/or non-celiac gluten sensitivity that comes my way, especially those that explore chronic pain and/or weight gain. In the case of No Grain No Pain, I had the privilege of reading it before its publication. A representative of Simon and Schuster contacted me with a copy of this book, asking me to write a promotional blurb for it. I was happy to read it. Then, I was very pleased to be able to give her the positive blurb she requested, in time for its release late in January 2016. Doubtless, they have contacted many others who have provided similar comments, and I hope that they found it as valuable and compelling as I did.
    My mom passed away on June 30, 2014, from a massive stroke. I authorized that she be unplugged from life support systems, as the doctors believed that she would not have any intellectual capacity in the unlikely event that she did recover. She had told me, many times, that she was tired of the pain, tired of the confusion, and tired of living. I'll miss my mom, and I have many second thoughts about how I handled or failed to handle the situations she found herself in. I'll never know, for sure, if my decisions were right or wrong. For myself, I'm pleased that she is no longer in pain, and I have re-dedicated myself to the dietary re-education of as many people as I can. And I hope that Dr. Osborne's new book will help others to avoid the "extended care" trap that my mom fell into.
    Source:
    1. Osborne P., NO GRAIN, NO PAIN. Touchstone, New York. 2016.

    Dr. Tom O'Bryan
    Celiac.com 04/18/2016 - In the last 3 years, there has been an evolving spectrum around celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. The acceptance of Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity (NCGS) in the medical community as a distinct clinical entity has gone from that of being an orphaned child crying in the world for recognition, to an accepted, unique component of the triad of gluten-related disorders.(i) Differentiating among gluten-related disorders, guides clinicians in making an accurate diagnosis and recommending specific dietary, nutritional and other medical advice; however, clinical and laboratory diagnosis is complex and evolving.(ii)
    Gluten sensitivity is a state of heightened immunological responsiveness to ingested gluten in genetically susceptible people. It represents a spectrum of diverse manifestations, of which, the gluten sensitive enteropathy known as celiac disease is one of many. Adverse reactions to the toxic family of gluten proteins found in wheat, barley, rye, and their derivatives may trigger a heterogeneous set of conditions, including wheat allergy (IgE), NCGS, and celiac disease, that, combined, affect between 10–35% of the population.(iv,v,vi,vii)
    TRUE or FALSE
    1. Even in the presence of negative small bowel biopsy, positive Endomysial antibody (EMA) IgA predicts development of celiac disease.
    2. The prevalence of celiac disease varies by race/ethnicity, with a marked predominance among non-Hispanic whites.
    3. With more sophisticated diagnostic markers now available, the majority of celiac disease cases are being recognized.
    4. Complete histological normalization of the small-intestinal mucosa occurs in the majority of adult patients after commencing a gluten-free diet.
    5. An American College of Gastroenterology Task force recommends that patients presenting with diarrhea-predominant IBS type symptoms should be serologically tested for celiac disease.
    6. What percent of individuals with NCGS suspect they may have a problem with wheat?
    A. 32%
    B. 76%
    C. 50%
    D. 12%
    7. Of the following three scenarios, which is the most dangerous for increased mortality in celiac disease?
    A. Total villous atrophy
    B. Positive celiac serology with negative villous atrophy
    C. Increased intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) with negative serology and negative villous atrophy
    8. In differentiating wheat sensitivity from IBS, which one of the following features is significantly more frequent in wheat sensitive patients compared to IBS patients?
    A. Anemia
    B. Self-reported fructose intolerance
    C. Weight gain
    D. Self-reported lactose intolerance
    9. Compared to patients with celiac disease, what are the characteristic features, other than self-reported wheat intolerance, of patients with wheat sensitivity?
    A. Anemia and family history of celiac disease
    B. Weight loss and increased IEL count
    C. Coexistent atopy and food allergy in infancy
    D. Increased serum C reactive protein and erythrocyte sedimentation rate
    Current therapeutic protocols for celiac disease, NCGS and wheat allergy include dietary counseling from a trained professional, nutritional therapy addressing biomarkers of malabsorption and creating a more balanced intestinal environment.(ix) Currently, there are no approved pharmaceutical treatments for this silent epidemic, however a number of Phase 3 trials are underway. Promising gluten-based research is currently being done including wheat alternatives and wheat selection, enzymatic alteration of wheat, oral enzyme supplements and polymeric binders as exciting new therapies for treatment of celiac disease.
    There appears to be at least two distinct groups of NCGS individuals. There are those who are sensitive to wheat and those who have multiple food sensitivities. Furthermore, the multiple food sensitivity group had a higher prevalence of coexisting atopy or food allergy in infancy.(xi) It is critically important to identify whether a NCGS individual has multiple food sensitivities or exclusively has NCGS.(xii) This suggests the world of NCGS is greater than just one mechanism and invites the clinician to explore its pathophysiology.
    ANSWERS
    1. True
    2. True
    3. False
    4. False
    5. True
    6. C
    7. C
    8. A
    9. C
    Request the complete article, complete answers and references by sending a request to info@theDr.com.
    References
    (i) Ludvigsson JF, Leffler DA, Bai JC, Biagi F, et.al., The Oslo definitions for coeliac disease and related terms, Gut. 2013 Jan;62(1):43-52
    (ii) O'Bryan T, Ford R, Kupper C, Celiac Disease and Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity-An Evolving Spectrum, in Advancing Medicine with Diet and Nutrients, Johns Hopkins, CRC Press, December 2012
    (iii) Carroccio A, Mansueto P, Iacono G, Soresi M, et.al., Non-celiac wheat sensitivity diagnosed by double-blind placebo-controlled challenge: exploring a new clinical entity, Am J Gastroenterol. 2012 Dec;107(12):1898-1906
    (iv) Catassi, C. and Fasano, A. 2008. Celiac disease. Curr Opin Gastroenterol 24: 687-91.
    (v) Anderson, L.A., McMillan, S.A., Watson, R.G., et al. 2007. Malignancy and mortality in a population based cohort of patients with coeliac disease or 'gluten sensitivity'. World J Gastroenterol 13: 146-51.
    (vi) Ferguson, A., Gillett, H., Humphreys, K., and Kingstone, K. 1998. Heterogeneity of celiac disease: clinical, pathological, immunological, and genetic. Intestinal Plasticity in Health and Disease. 859: 112-20.
    (vii) Constantin, C., Huber, W.D., Granditsch, G., Weghofer, M. and Valenta, R. 2005. Different profiles of wheat antigens are recognised by patient suffering from coeliac disease and IgE–mediated food allergy. Int Arch Allergy Immunol 138:257-66.
    (viii) Vermeersch P, Geboes K, Mariën G, Hoffman I, Hiele M, Bossuyt X. Diagnostic performance of IgG anti-deamidated gliadin peptide antibody assays is comparable to IgA anti-tTG in celiac disease. Clin Chim Acta. 2010 Jul 4;411(13-14):931-935.
    (ix) Ibid, reference 2
    (x) Stoven S, Murray JA, Marietta E., Celiac disease: advances in treatment via gluten modification, Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2012 Aug;10(8):859-62
    (xi) ibid reference 3
    (xii) Bondsa, R., Midoro-Horiutib, T. and Goldblum, R. 2008. A structural basis for food allergy: the role of cross-reactivity. Current Opinion in Allergy and Clinical Immunology 8: 82-86.
    (xiii) Kurppa K, Ashorn M, Iltanen S et al. Celiac disease without villous atrophy in children: a prospective study. J Pediatr 2010;157:373–380
    (xiv) Kurppa K, Collin P, Viljamaa M et al. Diagnosing mild enteropathy celiac disease: a randomized, controlled clinical study. Gastroenterology 2009;136:816–823
    (xv) Mayo Clinic, news release, July 31, 2012
    (xvi) Rubio-Tapia A, Ludvigsson JF, Brantner TL, Murray JA, Everhart JE., The prevalence of celiac disease in the United States. Am J Gastroenterol. 2012 Oct;107(10):1538-44
    (xvii) Tuire I, Marja-Leena L, Teea S, Katri H, et.al. Persistent duodenal intraepithelial lymphocytosis despite a long-term strict gluten-free diet in celiac disease, Am J Gastroenterol. 2012 Oct;107(10):1563-9
    (xviii) Sanders DS, Aziz I. Editorial: non-celiac wheat sensitivity: separating the wheat from the chat! Am J Gastroenterol. 2012 Dec;107(12):1908-12
    (xix) Ludvigsson JF, Montgomery SM, Ekbom A, Brandt L, Granath F., Small-intestinal histopathology and mortality risk in celiac disease, JAMA. 2009 Sep 16;302(11):1171-8
    (xx) Carroccio A, Mansueto P, Iacono G, Soresi M, et.al., Non-celiac wheat sensitivity diagnosed by double-blind placebo-controlled challenge: exploring a new clinical entity, Am J Gastroenterol. 2012 Dec;107(12):1898-906

    Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.
    Celiac.com 04/26/2016 - Vice President Dan Quayle famously stated: "what a waste it is to lose one's mind, or not to have a mind is being very wasteful, how true that is," when speaking to people involved in the United Negro College Fund (1). While it is entertaining to read and ponder, this statement evokes some ideas I have about senility, which is increasing, along with many other modern diseases, at a frightening speed. The prospect of losing my mind, my memory, my sense of connection with friends and loved-ones, and even my sense of identity and personal hygiene is a frightening spectre. Can you separate your memories and experiences, along with what you think and feel, from who you are? I can't. I'm not sure I would want to be able to do so. My identity is tied to my memories, experiences, and how I responded and continue to respond to them. I remember looking at my son's tiny hands and feet when we first brought him home from the hospital. My daughter, born prematurely, had even smaller digits. They seemed impossibly tiny yet they were all perfectly formed and quite beautiful. It seemed miraculous to me. It still does. I can't imagine anything that I'd be willing to accept in exchange for those memories. Neither would I willingly surrender my memory of the joy I felt at my first convocation or my first car. Yet those lost memories form the prison in which many people already find themselves. It appears that many more will follow.
    One segment of this problem, the epidemic of Alzheimer's disease (AD), already effects 5.4 million Americans and 30 million people throughout the world (2). Parkinson's disease, which is a neurological ailment that, in its later stages is often accompanied by dementia, is a similar ailment that is rapidly increasing both in absolute numbers and as a percentage of the population (3). Vascular dementia is yet another condition in which brain mass and mental acuity wane with advancing years (4). Perhaps this trend is partly due to the large number of aging baby boomers from the World War II era. But the relevant research suggests otherwise. Although we may be living longer and that may contribute to a small part of the growth of these devastating ailments, the biggest contributors appear to be lifestyle choices that include low daily activity levels, consumption of highly glycemic and inflammation-promoting refined carbohydrates and grain products, inadequate sleep duration, and exposure to toxic substances.
    As most students of celiac disease have long been aware, there is a powerful and potentially devastating component of brain and neurological damage associated with this ailment as a result of gluten grain consumption. In addition to the behavioral changes identified by Gibbons in 1889 (5), attention deficits identified by Reichelt (6), Neiderhofer (7, 8), and others (9 - 11), subsequent reports have connected increased incidence of seizure disorders(12-17), reductions of brain size (17 -20), a variety of neurological movement disorders (21 -23), a range of mood disorders (24, 25), and several psychiatric ailments (26, 27) including schizophrenia (28, 29), and signs of learning disabilities have been reported to improve quite dramatically and quickly on a gluten-free diet (30). Sleep disorders are also common among people with celiac disease (31). With emerging research into non-celiac gluten sensitivity over the last two decades, we have also begun to see evidence of similar connections between gluten consumption and most of these neurological/brain ailments. This added dimension of non celiac gluten sensitivity and its impact on human neurological health, were previously obscure and, in the case of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (26, 32), was thought to be rapidly deadly and incurable (33). Most recently, Bredesen reported that the gluten-free diet, or a low grain diet, forms one significant part of their multi-modal protocol for reversing several dementias among a small group of those who experienced recent symptom onset, including Alzheimer's disease, objectively identified disruptions in memory function or subjective, self-reported symptoms of dementia (2). Of the ten subjects studied in this latter investigation, nine showed substantial recovery in the form of symptom reversal along with either a return to work or improved performance at work (2).
    Harnessing the gluten-free diet makes sense, of course, because of the many neurological dimensions of gluten's harmful impact on human neurological tissues. Over the last 20 years, Dr. Marios Hadjivassiliou and colleagues, at the University of Sheffield and the Royal Hallamshire Hospital, have been reporting a wide range of neurological ailments in association with elevated anti-gliadin antibodies ( both with and without celiac disease) afflicting a large portion of their patients with neurological diseases of unknown origin (34 -37). Further, Dr. Joe Murray and colleagues have also reported on a group of thirteen patients experiencing moderate cognitive decline, three of whom experienced stabilized or improved cognitive function on a gluten-free diet alone (38). However, the protocol reported by Bredesen is aimed at correcting a greater number and broader spectrum of converging metabolic processes that are shaped, in large part, by our modern lifestyle, and are increasingly thought to be at the root of the current epidemic of dementias, including Alzheimer's disease (2). Gluten is only an important part of the overall picture. Dr. Suzanne de la Monte and colleagues have also identified a dynamic which they call type 3 diabetes at work in the brains of many patients with Alzheimer's disease (39). Insulin resistance, in the brain and elsewhere, is also a multi-factorial condition (40) which mostly involves disrupted metabolic processes, either through depletion of insulin production or, more likely, increased cellular resistance to insulin's movement of glucose into the cell.
    Dr. Dale Bredesen has argued that "in the past decade alone, hundreds of clinical trials have been conducted for AD, at an aggregate cost of billions of dollars, without success. This has led some to question whether the approach taken to drug development for AD is an optimal one" (2) This is the rationale that underlies his enormously broad therapeutic approach employed in his protocol.
    Please consider each of the following facets of Bredesen's therapeutic protocol:
    1. Serum testing was conducted and subsequent supplement recommendations were made, aimed at improving vitamin, mineral, amino acid, and herb supplements to achieve optimal values. All of the foregoing is aimed at harnessing their putative anti-oxidant function, supporting various facets of metabolism, and making use of their reported anti-inflammatory properties. Chelation therapy was also used to correct heavy metal (mercury, lead, cadmium) toxicity. Non-farmed fish, vegetables, and fruits were emphasized, while meat consumption was either discouraged or patients were encouraged to eat only organic and free range meat.
    2. Patients were given their choice of several low glycemic, low inflammatory, low grain diets. By this description, such a diet would exclude or severely limit gluten consumption.
    3. Patients were encouraged to engage daily in strategies, including meditation and listening to music, toward reducing their stress levels, which would reduce their cortisol production. Cortisol is a hormone that triggers increased release of glucose into the bloodstream, suppresses the immune system, and inhibits bone formation. In addition to excluding or treating sleep apnea, patients were prescribed melatonin at 0.5 mg daily, toward achieving at least eight hours of sleep each night, thereby reducing production of hunger-inducing ghrelin hormones in the stomach and increasing hunger-suppressing leptin hormones which are produced in the fat cells. Each carries its message to the brain.
    Reductions in cortisol and ghrelin secretion in combination with increasing leptin production would have a net effect of reducing inflammation while aiding weight loss and reducing blood glucose levels to normal fasting levels and targeting reduction of hemoglobin A1c levels to below 5.5, further reducing inflammation. Optimum levels of thyroid hormones, along with progesterone and pregnenolone were also pursued, along with reductions of free homocysteine to below 7 mg/L by prescription of vitamin B6, B12, and folic acid supplements, to reduce vascular damage and blockage that can be caused by elevated free homocysteine levels.
    Twice daily dietary supplementation with medium chain triglycerides (MCTs) also provides strategy for altering hormone production aimed at improved cognitive function. In humans, medium chain fatty acids resist storage. They must either be converted to ketone bodies in the liver, or rapidly utilized for energy. Because MCTs can induce the liver to increase ketone production, it provides an alternative energy source for many of the brain's cells, without requiring insulin to usher these ketones into the cells, as glucose does. In essence, adequate ketone production provides an alternative fuel both for many brain and other cells throughout the body. The liver mostly produces the ketone called beta-hydroxybutyrate. This acts not only as a fuel source, but is also a powerful anti-oxidant that does not require insulin to enter the cell, unlike vitamin C, which does require insulin to enter cells.
    4. To further promote these values and other facets of wellness arising out of regular activity, patients were asked to exercise for 30 to 60 minutes per day, 4 to 6 days each week.
    Each and all of the above have been reported somewhere in the literature as valid and valuable as part of reversing dementias, which Bredesen's list of citations supports (2). However, while significant improvements in the dementia symptoms of nine of the ten subjects does argue for the validity of this protocol, wholesale acceptance of all of the concepts here would fail to narrow our focus on those factors that are most likely to contribute to causing the vast majority of the various dementias that are contributing to the emerging epidemic. Bredesen also acknowledges that study participants were encouraged to follow as many instructions as they could. They were not asked or expected to be fully compliant with the instructions they were given. Nonetheless, I would probably err on the side of caution, by implementing as many of these strategies as possible, were I dealing with a loved-one who struggled with dementia.
    Conversely, I would be most reluctant to accept the interdiction of meats, organic or otherwise. On the other hand, growth promotion using low doses of anti-biotics can result in delivering anti-biotic resistant microbes. Poultry, hogs, and cattle are all high risk meats. Further, grains, especially gluten grains and corn, combine to form the mainstay of feeds used to fatten these animals and birds for market, where weight is the determining factor in the price paid for these meats.
    Bredesen also pointed, quite rightly, to the small number of subjects as a weakness in his study. However, when 9 of their 10 subjects achieved such remarkable results, especially in the context of the common belief that dementia, at any stage, is irreversible, this study certainly suggests that exploring dementias as a group of metabolic illnesses is a potentially fruitful path.
    This is a perspective that is enjoying considerable support from a variety of sources. Many researchers have, for the past decade or so, thought of many dementias as type 3 diabetes, with a growing body of support for this perspective amassing in the peer reviewed literature (41). More recently, chronic sleep deprivation has been similarly implicated in several ways. The first is specific to Alzheimer's disease, where beta amyloid deposits or plaques characterize this ailment. New research has shown that during sleep, brain tissues shrink, while the fluids that surround the brain permeate these tissues and inter-cellular structures, assimilating amyloid, which is a group of protein fragments (peptides) that are waste products of daytime brain cell activities (42). Because there is no lymphatic system in the brain, it has long been believed that the brain did not dispose of its waste products. However, another field of brain research has shown that conduits of these fluids form surrounding the blood vessels, carrying waste products into the bloodstream and, ultimately, out of the brain for disposal (42). Since average nightly sleep duration has shortened from nine hours to seven hours, given the above research findings, this reduction in sleep decreases our nightly capacity to remove waste amyloid and other detritus, leading to the formation and growth of amyloid deposits, which characterize at least one form of dementia.
    This same culture-wide sleep deprivation also induces memory disturbances and memory losses. It does so by a circuitous route. Throughout the day, each of us encodes memories through our hippocampus, a small region of the brain that is also involved in spatial navigation and contributes, with other parts of the lymbic system, to the regulation of many body functions. During sleep, the day's memories are thought to be processed and integrated with prior knowledge, emotions, and impressions in the neo-cortex. Some researchers are now postulating that this integration process is what results in our dreams (43-45). Regardless of whether it is the author of our dreams, Dr. Robert Stickgold and colleagues have shown that sleep helps us to consolidate the day's learning experiences, thus improving our memory retention. He has also shown that inadequate sleep compromises learning (43). The net result is that we not only need sleep to permit the brain to clean out the day's wastes, we also need it to form and preserve learning.
    Although Bredesen made no mention of it, there is another complicating factor here. Statin drugs are aimed at reducing cholesterol. However, they have also been shown to induce memory problems. One friend of mine was prescribed a statin drug, and he stopped being able to recognize me. After discontinuing this medication, he told me that I looked familiar, but he couldn't even guess at my name or where he knew me from. He waves hello to me from across the street, but doesn't cross it to visit anymore. And that seems to be where the recovery of his memory is stalled. It is with heart-rending sadness that I occasionally see him in passing. I say hello. But if he doesn't notice me waving or hear me shouting, there isn't even an exchange of greetings. He seems happy enough. So perhaps the loss is mostly mine. But I don't imagine that he would willingly have chosen this "new" world of his.
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    Tina Turbin
    Celiac.com 05/17/2016 - The paleolithic diet, or paleo diet which happens to be gluten-free, has been growing increasingly popular among athletes and health advocates, but it has a history dating back to the mid-1970's as a means of preventing diseases and health conditions such as autoimmune diseases and cancer, when investigations were made of the eating patterns of our hunter-gatherer ancestors.
    The paleo gluten-free diet, the "biologically appropriate" diet, is named for the Paleolithic era, which extended 2.5 million years ending in 10,000 B.C. with the advent of agriculture and animal husbandry. It's comprised of the foods our human ancestors consumed during this period, namely wild-caught fish, grass-fed meats, fruits, vegetables, roots, and nuts. Any "modern" foods introduced from the agricultural era forward such as grains, dairy, sugar, and processed foods are eliminated.
    People all over have found the paleo gluten-free diet is an effective answer for weight loss, optimizing health and fitness—and building muscle tone. According to research, pre-agricultural humans were free of the diseases of the civilized world such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, obesity, and autoimmune diseases. Modern studies, including clinical studies, have shown as well that the paleo diet and the restoration of the lifestyle conditions of our ancestors, such as exercise, have resolved numerous diseases.
    The theory behind the diet, supported by extensive archeological and anthropological evidence, is based on the premise that modern humans do best on paleolithic nutrition because human genetics have largely remained the same since the pre-agricultural era and thus our genetic makeup is best suited to the ancestral human diet.
    If you're looking to build muscle tone, meet with a qualified health practitioner to see if the diet is for you. I think you'll find that whatever your reason for starting the paleo diet and lifestyle, whether to optimize your fitness routine, lose weight, alleviate autoimmune disease symptoms such as celiac disease, or increase your longevity, eating in the biologically appropriate way for our bodies not only has the power to change your body and your health, but your quality of life.
    While many people are eating paleo gluten-free as a way to correct health conditions or improve their overall health, active individuals and athletes have been following the diet in order to lose fat and build muscle more efficiently, according to MuscleMag.
    In fact, one of the best known proponents of the paleo diet, Robb Wolf, former biochemist and author of The Paleo Solution, regards the diet as performance-enhancing and trains world-class athletes at his gym in Chico, California.
    According to Robb, our human ancestors were taller, leaner, and better built than humans now, as anthropological evidence shows us. According to MuscleMag, only during the last 10,000 years, since the advent of agriculture, have humans consumed grains, legumes and dairy—and during this same period, humans have also become "significantly shorter, fatter, less muscular and more prone to disease," as anthropological studies point out. Let's take a look at some of the reasons why the paleo gluten-free diet is optimum for building muscle tone.
    The paleo gluten-free diet, consisting wholly of unprocessed foods like seafood, lean meat, fruits and vegetables, nuts and roots, is much more nutritious than the foods from the Neolithic era and beyond. The optimal nutritional intake on the paleo gluten-free diet is a vital part of developing muscle tone.
    Although you'll hear grain advocates singing the praises of the fiber and B vitamin content of grains, you'll actually find more of these nutrients in grain-free foods, as long as you eat a variety of nutrient-rich whole foods. According to GrainFreeLifestyle.com, "If you can find the nutrient in grain, you can find the nutrient in better quantities in other foods." For example, 100 grams of whole wheat flour contains 44 mcg of folate, but a 100-gram serving of lamb liver yields 400 mcg of folate and a 100-gram serving of yard-long beans offers 658 mcg. Also, 100 grams of cooked brown rice has 1.8 grams of dietary fiber, whereas a 100-gram serving of cooked collard greens has 2.8 grams and green peas offer approximately 5 grams of fiber per serving.
    In fact, grains that are poorly prepared, which is most often the case, can prevent the absorption of vitamins and minerals. Your diet may be rich in nutrients, but if it's also rich in improperly prepared grains, you won't be able to absorb them due to substances in grain such as phytic acid, which binds with minerals so you can't absorb them properly.
    Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye. The paleo diet is a naturally gluten-free diet because it is a grain-free diet. Studies show that 1% of the population has celiac disease, an autoimmune condition triggered by the ingestion of gluten, which causes the immune system to attack the lining of the digestive tract and inhibits the proper absorption of nutrients from your food.
    But experts are saying that a large proportion of non-celiac individuals are suffering from gluten intake as well. Some researchers estimate that as much as 40% of the population is also sensitive or downright intolerant to gluten, which can lead to the same symptoms and conditions of celiac disease. Celiac disease and gluten sensitivity are severely undiagnosed, and it could be the case that you yourself have gluten issues.
    Not only grains but other Neolithic and modern foods, such as legumes, dairy products, sugar, and processed oils can irritate the digestive tract as well. For example, legumes contain antinutrients such as lectins, saponins, and protease inhibitors, which cause damage to the intestines and hormonal and immune systems, leading to inflammation and increasing the risk of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. All soy products and peanuts are actually classified as legumes and are to be avoided on the paleo gluten-free diet.
    With intestinal inflammation, nutrient absorption is severely limited, especially when it comes to protein. Furthermore, the inflammatory response in the gut can spread throughout the body. This systemic inflammation can lead to the retaining of water as well as weakening the immune system, while a strong immune system is vital when it comes to recovering from intense exercise and building muscle.
    Let's dive into how to get superior sources of protein, weaning off of detrimental grains and improve muscle tone and exercise recovery time in the next issue.

    Monique Attinger
    Celiac.com 06/07/2016 - The world of nutrition is currently obsessed with "super foods". Super foods are loosely defined as foods that are extremely high in nutrients – particularly antioxidants and vitamins – and which everyone is heartily advised to add to their diet.
    The problem with this approach is that, while focused firmly on nutrients, we are ignoring anti-nutrients! According to Wikipedia, an anti-nutrient is a compound in food that interferes with your absorption of other nutrients from a food. Most foods have varying amounts of anti-nutrients, toxins and other problematic compounds. A truly healthy diet will include weighing the good against the bad, while maintaining as much variety as possible. Once we have a clearer picture of how a food helps to support our nutrition, we can then decide how to include it in our diet and in what amount.
    Obviously, certain health conditions mean that certain foods are no longer healthful. For those with celiac disease, this means that grains with gluten in them are damaging to their health. It really doesn't matter how healthy wheat bran is for some – for celiacs, wheat bran is harmful. For those with allergies, you have a similar issue. Foods that may be healthy for some may not be for others.
    Another issue with food and health can be related to anti-nutrients. For instance, in the vegetarian world, we now hear more about phytate – often found in legumes – and how to reduce it in a plant-based diet. Salicylate is another anti-nutrient found in plant foods, and more people are finding that they need to consider this when choosing foods.
    Plants may also contain toxins, which are totally natural to the plant, but not good for you. Wikipedia indicates that a toxin is a substance that is directly poisonous, and capable of causing disease. For instance, some foods may contain naturally occurring cyanide compounds, or even arsenic in various forms. While we may not get enough to cause immediate problems, we certainly don't want to consume a lot of these toxins!
    Oxalate is another toxin present in many otherwise healthy foods. Oxalate poses many challenges for human health. It's a free radical. It promotes inflammation in your body. Because of its biochemistry, oxalate can be stored throughout your body, and can be particularly concentrated at the sites of previous injury, inflammation or surgery. Fundamentally, oxalate can be stored in tissues wherever the cells have taken it up. As a result, if you are someone who is absorbing too much oxalate from your diet, you can be contributing substantial stress to your body.
    Reducing the amount of oxalate in your diet cannot hurt you – you are reducing a totally non-nutritive substance for which the human body has no need and which contributes directly to health issues.
    However, reducing too many food types or nutrients in your diet can have negative impacts. The greater the variety in your diet, the better the chance that you are getting all your needed nutrients. The good news is that you can have a nutritious, high variety diet, and retain "super foods" in your diet which are high nutrition, gluten-free and low oxalate.
    Get Your Fiber
    The preponderance of processed foods in our diets can often leave us with hardly any fiber in our diet! Many gluten-free options are very low in fiber, and this can affect gut health. Fiber is not a direct nutrient for us per se – but it is a needed component that contributes to better gut flora and better health overall.
    Insoluble fiber adds bulk to the stool and promotes regularity. Most of us are not getting enough of this fiber, and as a result, can develop poor motility and constipation.
    Given that many whole grains are not good alternatives for those on a gluten-free diet, and the bran of many grains are actually high in oxalate, how can we get more healthy insoluble fiber? The good news is that one nutritional powerhouse is not only full of healthy insoluble fiber – it's also a plant source of Omega 3's. So a great solution to lack of insoluble fiber is flax seeds.
    Flax seeds can be eaten whole – but to really get the best benefits from this super food, it's best to grind your flax. Keep whole flax seeds in the freezer to preserve their freshness, and don't grind until just before using them. The recommended daily serving (which will also provide some soluble fiber) is two tablespoons.
    According to the Mayo Clinic, the right fiber goes much further than just regularity. If you increase soluble fiber, it can help reduce both blood sugar and cholesterol. Soluble fiber creates a gel-like material in the gut, and some research indicates that it may help to feed our gut bacteria.
    The benefits of soluble fiber are well known when it comes to cholesterol. The recommended food to get more soluble fiber is oats. However, whole oats are high in oxalate, and the oat bran has confusing test data.
    The solution? Psyllium! Pysllium is the medicinal ingredient in the popular product, Metamucil. Psyllium contains both soluble and insoluble fiber – and research on it shows that it can help to reduce cholesterol as well as normalize blood sugar. You can add it to baked products (but adjust the liquids), or sprinkle on foods. It's virtually tasteless – although you might find it does add some thickness or texture to liquids or foods.
    Fruits and vegetables are also good sources of both soluble and insoluble fiber and many are lower oxalate. Cabbages, lettuces, onions, cucumbers (with the skin) red bell peppers, orange, mango and grapes are all good low oxalate sources of fiber in your diet.
    Fruits
    There is no shortage of healthy options in fresh fruits that are also low oxalate, but the blueberry holds a special place among even the healthiest fruits.
    Research shows that blueberries are one of the most antioxidant rich foods available, and are included in most lists of super foods. Blueberries are one of the highest rated foods on the ORAC scale. The ORAC scale was developed by researchers at Tufts University, and is the measure of Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (hence the abbreviation ORAC). What this really means for you is that the higher something ranks on the ORAC scale, the more antioxidants you are getting.
    Blueberries are stars on this scale, with an ORAC value of 4,669 per 100 grams, according to Superfoodly.com. Wild blueberries rank higher than cultivated ones – but you can't go wrong with any blueberry.
    Another fruit that ranks very high in ORAC is the lowly cranberry. While very tart (and difficult to eat raw), cranberries are second only to blueberries in antioxidant levels. To reduce the acidity of the fruit, and make them more palatable, cook with water and some honey. Cranberries are very easy to cook and make a lovely side dish for fattier meats like lamb. They aren't just for turkey anymore! Consuming these tangy fruits also help to contribute to bladder health.
    For nutrition on the go, turn to golden seedless raisins. While dark raisins are tasty treats, the golden seedless variety is both lower in oxalate and higher in antioxidants. In fact, golden seedless raisins actually have a higher ORAC score than fresh blueberries! Combine that with convenience and portability, and you have an easy way to get more antioxidants in your day. Raisins also make a great treat for kids, because of their sweetness.
    Is the apple a super food? Yes it is! Easy to purchase and pack for lunch, this popular fruit is full of quercetin, which protects cells from damage and is often recommended for those with allergies. Not only is it full of healthy antioxidants, it also has twice the fiber of other commonly eaten fruits, including peaches, grapes and grapefruit, according to the site EverydayHealth.com.
    Veggies
    When looking at veggies, many of the foods that are considered most healthy are also very high in oxalate. Everyone talks today about how healthy the sweet potato is for us: but did you know that a ½ cup of sweet potato can have over 90 mg of oxalate in it? For people trying to eat a low oxalate diet, a single serving would be more oxalate than they should consume in a whole day!
    However, while avoiding high oxalate foods, you do need to eat color and variety to get your needed nutrition. If you want a lower carbohydrate, orange veggie – consider the kabocha squash. Not only does this lower carb, low oxalate veggie work as a substitute for many recipes that require sweet potato, it also has a very good nutrient profile. Self Nutrition Data lists Vitamin A and Vitamin C as well as a good serving of Folate, in addition to good amounts of calcium, magnesium, phosphorus and potassium.
    Of course, you want other colors in your veggies as well – and green leafy veggies are particularly known for their nutrition. While spinach would be a bad choice because of extremely high oxalate, you have lots of other greens to choose from. Focus on lower oxalate varieties of kale, including purple kale. The website, The World's Healthiest Foods, lists kale as a food that can lower cholesterol (if steamed) as well as lower your risk of cancer. Of course, kale is part of the cruciferous vegetable family, and these foods have many anti-cancer benefits. Kale is an excellent source of Vitamin K (your blood clotting factor), as well as vitamin A, vitamin C, manganese, copper, B6 and others.
    Don't forget your other brassicas while you are focusing on kale! The cruciferous veggies also support our bodies natural detox processes, which is very valuable in today's world where we are exposed to many environmental toxins. Broccoli is another low oxalate brassica that is good for you, whether you are eating the mature broccoli heads, or feasting on broccoli sprouts. Note that broccoli sprouts do have an edge over their more mature cousins – they might just taste better, and given that they can be added to a sandwich for some satisfying crunch, might be easier to work into your daily diet. Research gives the sprouts a further edge in cancer risk reduction and some research indicates they may actually help to prevent stomach cancer.
    Another excellent leafy green is the lowly turnip green. Turnip greens are very high in calcium, and are even lower in oxalate than kale. A cup of cooked turnip greens will also get you more than 100% of the RDA for vitamin K. In addition, you'll get vitamin A, vitamin C, folate, copper, manganese, calcium, and vitamin E. Each serving will give you 15% of your daily requirement for B6.
    When thinking of deep red veggies, go for red cabbage. This versatile veggie is very low in oxalate, and that lovely red color means that it has even more protective phytonutrients, according to World's Healthiest Foods, than its green sibling! One serving of red cabbage delivers more than four times the polyphenols of green cabbage.
    Fats and Oils
    You can't read on super food nutrition anywhere and not run into the avocado. A great source of healthy monounsaturated fat, the avocado has also been linked to reduced risk of cancer, as well as lowered risk of heart disease and diabetes. While we think of avocados as a fatty food, they are actually a good source of fiber, with 11 to 17 grams of fiber per fruit! You'll also get a dose of lutein, an antioxidant recommended for eye health.
    Web MD says that lutein is a potent antioxidant, which is found in high concentrations in the eye. The combination of lutein and zeaxanthin (another antixodant) help to protect your eyes from damaging, high energy light. Some research indicates that a diet high in lutein and zeaxanthin may reduce the risk of cataracts by as much as 50%.
    Coconut oil is another excellent fat that can benefit our bodies in a host of ways. Doctor Oz lists a number of benefits, including supporting thyroid health and blood sugar control. This may be related to the form of saturated fat that is found in coconut oil, called lauric acid. Lauric acid is a medium-chain triglyceride. This kind of fat actually boosts immune system, and has antibiotic, antiviral and antifungal properties. It may also be a tool in your weight loss arsenal. A study in 2009 actually showed the eating 2 Tablespoons of coconut oil daily, allowed subjects to lose belly fat more effectively. Even better news for those who are following a low oxalate diet: both avocado and coconut oil have zero oxalate!
    Nuts, Seeds and Legumes
    Unfortunately, many foods in this category are high oxalate – and so won't qualify for our super food list. While you might be able to have a couple of walnut halves, or a similar amount of pecans, nuts are generally just to high to have in servings of more than 3-5 pieces.
    However, if you are looking for a superfood in this category, look no further than pumpkin seeds! Pumpkin seeds are an excellent source of vegetable-based protein, and are another portable food. A great snack for the health conscious can be made with raisins and pumpkin seeds – both are low oxalate, and the protein of the pumpkin seeds will help you to stay fuller longer. According to LiveStrong.com, a handful of pumpkin seeds will give you over 8 grams of protein. At the same time, pumpkin seeds are low in sugar, and provide you with fiber as part of the carbohydrate in them. You will also get vitamin A, vitamin B, vitamin K, thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, magnesium, calcium, iron, manganese, zinc, potassium, copper and phosphorus in that small and compact package!
    If pumpkin seeds don't qualify as a super food, it's hard to say what would!
    When it comes to legumes, many are stars for protein, but one of the best options is the red lentil. Lentils in general are easier to prepare than other types of legumes – they do not require the soaking and preparation time that many legumes do. At the same time, they are powerhouses of nutrition, with molybdenum, folate, fiber, copper, phosphorus and manganese all at more than 50% of your daily requirement. One cup of cooked lentils will also give you 36 % of your daily need for protein, according to World's Healthiest Foods. And all this nutrition is provided in a food that is virtually fat free and low in calories. You cannot go wrong!
    As an added benefit, some studies have found that eating high fiber foods like red lentils may reduce the risk of heart disease. The more fiber, the lower the risk of heart disease.
    Fish
    We are always hearing that we need to have more fish in our diets. It seems sometimes that not a week goes by when we are not hearing that we should be eating less meat, and getting less fat – with the suggestion that more fish would benefit us.
    When you think of the super food of fish, you have to think of salmon. Salmon is a fatty fish, and it's one of the best sources available for omega-3 fatty acids. In today's world of processed foods, omega-3's are one of the nutrients that we don't get enough of.
    Your best bet with salmon is to get wild-caught fish. Farmed salmon do not have the same nutrient profile, which may be related to the kind of food they are fed. Along with the decreased nutrient profile, studies have indicated that farmed salmon contains significantly higher concentrations of a number of contaminants (including PCBs, dieldrins, toxaphenes, dioxins and chlorinated pesticides) than wild caught salmon.
    World's Healthiest Foods states that a 4 ounce piece of Coho salmon will get you 55% of your daily requirements for omega-3 fats. On top of that, you'll get more than 50% of your daily requirement for vitamin B12, vitamin D, selenium, vitamin B3, protein and phosphorus, as well as other B vitamins and minerals.
    Omega-3 fatty acids will provide you a host of benefits, from reduction of inflammation, to better brain function. Omega-3 fat is also heart healthy, and can contribute to a reduced risk of heart attack, stroke, high blood pressure and other cardiovascular disease. Research indicates that eating salmon at least 2 to 3 times a week will give you the best benefits.
    Spice it up
    Spices can be a bit tricky, if you want to keep your oxalate low. Many spices – while tasty – are very high in oxalate!
    A great example of this is turmeric. A staple in most curry recipes, turmeric is extremely high oxalate – so while it has a reputation as a super food, it would not be a good choice if you are trying to keep your oxalate low.
    So what is your option if you love to eat foods spiced with turmeric? Well, the easiest approach is to stock your spice rack with a health food store supplement; cook with curcumin extract! While it may seem a bit odd at first, if you buy a curcumin extract (which is the extract from turmeric), you can get the flavor and leave the oxalate behind.
    While not technically a "food" when you cook with a supplement, you certainly get all the benefits of the original super food – turmeric – without the downside of oxalate.
    Another highly beneficial spice is cinnamon. Research clearly shows how helpful cinnamon is for managing blood sugar. However, ground cinnamon is an extremely high oxalate spice. So how can you get the flavor you want, while avoiding the oxalate?
    One solution is to cook with a cinnamon extract that you buy at the health food store! One brand known to be low oxalate is Doctor's Best. It is a dry extract in capsules – simply break open the capsules and use the contents in your dish. This allows you to get all the therapeutic benefits of the extract as well as the taste.
    You can also cook with essential oils and culinary oils – but use them carefully. Essential oils can be very strong and can irritate the tissues of the mouth and digestive tract. One drop of good quality essential cinnamon oil will replace as much as 1 tablespoon of ground cinnamon. Culinary oils are made for flavoring – follow the directions on the product that you buy. Either way, you will get the taste – and you avoid the oxalate.
    Enjoying Your Food!
    As with anyone who wants to eat a healthy diet full of super foods, the trick is to focus on the best nutrition, and get lots of variety. While some foods may not be as "super" as others, if you are making colorful meals, with healthful selections from across the spectrum, you'll be doing your body a favor with flavor!
    Where Does Oxalate Go?
    Once you have eaten oxalate, you have to excrete it through urine, feces or sweat. But what happens if you don't? A study on rats was able to trace where in the body a dose of oxalate remained. The scientists used a special carbon molecule – carbon 14 – in the oxalate they gave to the rats, so that they could find the oxalate wherever it went in the body.
    What they found is that if the oxalate was not excreted from the body, it was stored everywhere:
    68% in the bones 9% in the spleen 8% in the adrenal glands 3% in the kidneys 3% in the liver 8% in the rest of the body These results are in direct opposition to conventional medical thinking, that oxalate only affects the kidneys. It clearly shows us that the whole body – but particularly the bones, key glands and detoxification organs – are all affected. This is another good reason to reduce the amount of oxalate in your diet!
    Is Spinach Really That Bad For You?
    A relatively simple study in the late 1930's looked at rats fed a diet that was only adequate in calcium. To bring the levels of calcium up, the rats were given spinach, equaling about 8% of their diet. While most of us think of spinach in terms of iron, it is also relatively high in calcium. The results of the study were shocking:
    47. A high percentage of rats died between the age of 21 days and 90 days 48. The bones of the rats were extremely low in calcium (despite adding it to the diet through the spinach) 49. Tooth structure was poor and dentine of the teeth poorly calcified 50. For these animals, reproduction was impossible. Researchers concluded that not only did spinach not supply the needed calcium (because of the oxalate), but the spinach also rendered the calcium from other foods unavailable. What we know now is that oxalate is a mineral chelator – and rather than delivering minerals, it was robbing them from the rats.
    Getting Your Vitamin K
    Vitamin K is a very important nutrient. Life Extension indicates that new research from 2014 links vitamin K to longevity. In fact, the highest intakes of vitamin K reduced the likelihood of dying from any cause by 36%! So, you definitely want to get vitamin K in your diet.
    However, most of us think that we need to eat high oxalate greens – like spinach – in order to get good amounts of vitamin K. Nothing could be further from the truth! Kale, collards and turnip greens are all higher in vitamin K than spinach, and they have a fraction of the oxalate.

    Yvonne Vissing Ph.D.
    Celiac.com 07/11/2016 - People with celiac disease know that going gluten free isn't a choice—it is a health necessity. It is also a human rights issue. Food and nutrition should be seen as a citizen's human and social right. People who fail to be attentive to the health needs of people with celiac disease may be violating their rights. Like many rights issues, people may not realize they've violated someone's rights by doing, or not doing, something. But when you are the one whose rights have been violated, you know. The violation is serious for you, even when others may be oblivious to the larger context of the violation. Thinking about being gluten-free in this context may be different from the way most people view celiac disease. But it is a point of view that is well worth considering.
    When you've got celiac disease and people aren't attentive to making sure you can eat gluten-free foods that are safely prepared and not contaminated, you can end up very sick in the short-run. The short-term effects may include symptoms such as gastrointestinal upset, migraines, fuzzy brain, sweats, and general malaise. As a fundamental right, what one eats should ensure people's access to a healthy, dignified and full life. People who have been "glutened" do not feel dignified as they writhe in pain, wrestle with fears of embarrassment, or modify their lifestyle and social schedules to accommodate the illness. In the long-run, if someone is continually exposed to gluten in foods, a variety of serious preventable health conditions may result. Unlike a peanut allergy that can directly kill you, exposure to gluten may result in morbidity and early mortality for people in an indirect fashion. Adhering to a gluten-free diet is of paramount importance to avoid health problems such as compromising one's weight and pubertal development, fertility, bone mineral density, and deficiencies of micro and macronutrients, not to mention the increased risk of developing malignancies, especially in the gastrointestinal system. Because the health effects of ingesting gluten for someone with celiac disease are less visible to those who don't experience them, they have been easier to ignore. Thanks to vocal advocates who now know that going gluten-free can save their lives, it is obvious that the lack of attention to making sure people can eat safely is a violation of their rights.
    Let's put the issue of gluten into a larger rights context. The United Nations Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR) was adopted in 1948 after World War II and it is the first global document that codified rights to which all human beings are inherently entitled. It contains a wide range of rights and is regarded as the foundation upon which other rights documents have been built. Its Article 25 states that "Everyone has the right to a standard of living adequate for the health and well-being of himself and of his family, including food, clothing, housing and medical care and necessary social services, and the right to security in the event of unemployment, sickness, disability, widowhood, old age or other lack of livelihood in circumstances beyond his control" (www.un.org/en/universal-declaration-human-rights/). The right to health and well-being are directly linked to food. Conditions like celiac disease, which are genetic in nature, are thus beyond one's control and necessary to be addressed through appropriate care and management.
    In another rights treaty document that pertains directly to the rights of children and youth, the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) addresses in Article 3 that "In all actions concerning children….the best interests of the child shall be a primary consideration", that individuals responsible for them are required to ensure that they receive the services and protections they need, particularly in the areas of safety (and) health…". Article 24 "recognizes the right of the child to the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health and to facilities for the treatment of illness and rehabilitation of health. States Parties shall strive to ensure that no child is deprived of his or her right of access to such health care services". It goes on to emphasize the importance of disease prevention and primary health care "through the provision of adequate nutritious foods" (http://www.ohchr.org/en/professionalinterest/pages/crc.aspx). This implies that nutritious foods are linked with disease prevention and well-being, and making sure children (and adults) get the proper foods is in their best interests. If a child has celiac disease and the responsible adults are inattentive to making sure they can eat safely, they are in fact violating the child's rights. There are, then, international treaties that link food and nutrition directly with human rights.
    Juliana Nadal at the Department of Nutrition, Food Quality and Nutrition at the Federal University of Parana in Brazil reviews in her journal article, "The principle of human right to adequate food and celiac disease" (Demetra; 2013; 8(3); 411-423), a variety of ways that people who have celiac disease have their rights violated. Because celiac disease can be considered the most common food intolerance in the world, it is one that both individuals and social structures need to address as a mainstream issue. From how laws and consumer protections are designed at the macro level, to how food is made available and prepared at the micro level, rights of people with celiac disease hang in limbo. Some places and people are very attentive to their rights protections while others are not. Nadal contextualizes food and nutrition insecurity that afflicts individuals with celiac disease with specific regard to the principle of the Human Right to Adequate Food (HRAF).
    Diet is the single most secure treatment form for people with celiac disease. Managing one's diet enables one to control the magnitude of the disease. Laws, standards, practices and policies are necessary to secure HRAF for people with celiac disease. It is therefore important that the public be educated regarding this. By protecting individual fundamental human right to food availability in both quantity and quality, it reflects the value of society to protect the welfare of this group of people. Ultimately, rights protections promote and improve the health of the entire population.
    Rights violations may also be seen through the limited availability of products intended for celiac individuals in the market. Whether looking at gluten-free food as a local, state, regional, national or global issue, there are certain countries and areas that do not have access to the same quantity and variety of gluten-free foods as in other areas. Online shopping may make it easier for some people to access foods they need, but this option is not necessarily available to everyone. If foods essential for good diets are not accessible, this forces people to make dietary compromises that may not be in their best interest.
    Another area of rights violations for people who have to go gluten-free is the high cost of products. Simply put, gluten-free foods tend to cost more than other foods. People who have celiac disease have to use more of their scarce dollars to pay for food. This means there is less money available to pay for other necessities. Because gluten-free foods tend to be more expensive, this creates a social class barrier, especially for poor people or financially-strapped people with celiac disease. Poorer people will have their right to safe nutrition compromised because they can't afford the same foods as more affluent people who have celiac disease.
    The issue of gluten contamination contributes to a constant situation of food and nutritional insecurity to holders of this special dietary need. The celiac diet must be completely gluten-free, which allows people to have a life relatively free of major pathological complications. Maintaining a totally gluten-free diet is not an easy task because the violation of the diet may occur voluntarily or involuntarily, and range from incorrect information on food labels to the gluten contamination of processed products. Difficulties in the availability and access to food without gluten violates the principle of the human right to adequate food. The condition of being a celiac individual exposes one to permanent food and nutrition insecurity, which could cause loss of quality of life, socialization, and health of the individual, both in the short and long term.
    The problematic situation of food and nutritional insecurity that afflicts individuals with celiac disease can productively be addressed with regard to the principle of the human right to adequate food (HRAF) from the perspective of Food and Nutrition Security (FNS). It is important to know and recognize the real need of the people who live in some way under threat of food insecurity, how it impacts their health and lifestyle. Constructing, implementing and improving health policies in order to meet their needs is imperative to provide access to adequate food of nutritional quality. and to ensure that food, biological, social and cultural needs are achieved.
    By understanding food as a basic human right, it is easy to understand that the absence of safe foods that address the needs of celiac individuals represents a concrete case of a group of people who often may have their rights to adequate nutrition violated. As a result, many live in a state of food and nutrition insecurity. Food must be viewed as a constitutional right of all citizens, including those with special needs which require a special diet.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 10/18/2016 - Whole grains, including gluten-free grains, have never been more popular, but as their fortunes grow as a whole, that of wheat is diminishing.
    The whole grains category includes both gluten-free grains, such as quinoa and other ancient grains, and gluten grains, such as barley, rye and triticale, but wheat products have never been less popular, and continue their downward sales slide.
    This year, 1,282 new products have registered for the Whole Grain Stamp so far, a pace set to meet or beat last year's record of 2,122 new products; up from 1,666 in 2014 and 1,622 in 2013, according to Cynthia Harriman, director of food and nutrition strategies at the Whole Grains Council. More than half of new products with the Whole Grain Stamp had a gluten-free first ingredient last year, an increase over 33% in 2007 to 2009, according to Harriman. However, even as scientists question the claimed benefits of gluten-free foods, such as weight loss, for people without celiac disease, many consumers are eating gluten-free foods "just for the variety," Harriman said.
    Either way, the market for gluten-free foods is set to approach $5 billion by 2021, up from $2.84 billion in 2014. Going forward, more of that market will go to gluten-free grains, lees to wheat.
    Flour used to be the main way consumers bought whole grains, but now consumers and manufacturers are embracing complete, minimally processed whole grains, which can improve product textures, flavors and health benefits.
    Sprouted grains are also receiving more attention and are expected to generate product sales of $250 million by 2018. Overall, 27% of consumers say they are eating more whole grains than they did six months ago, according to a recent survey.
    Read more at Fooddive.com.

    Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.
    Celiac.com 10/04/2016 - Several years ago, Dr. Levinovitz contacted me by telephone, asking if he could interview me then, and in subsequent calls, for a book he was writing about gluten consumption. Assuming he, as an academic employed by a university, had an open mind, I was happy to share my own anti-gluten paradigm and the sources of my angst about these harmful foods. Dr. Levinovitz mentioned that he was involved in religious studies, but since I had earned my doctorate in the field of Education, I didn't feel any particular concern about answering his questions or his qualifications to write about gluten. As the interviews proceeded (he called back for further information and/or clarification at least once more but I think it was twice) I was most anxious to help with his project as I see gluten as a food source that fosters a great deal of illness. Because he used a poor, static laden Internet phone (VOIP) for these interviews, I missed much of what he was saying, but when I got the gist of his questions, I did my best to answer as fully and honestly as I could.
    However, when I mentioned that several of my former students had benefitted academically from excluding gluten from their diets, he wanted their names and contact information. That is when I began to feel uneasy. I told him that I would get back to him with that information if my former students were willing to be interviewed. After some thought, I decided that I would not expose these people to Dr. Levinovitz's questions without their prior permission and without a clear understanding of what he was trying to accomplish. He was quite forthcoming when I asked for some specifics about his book project. He said that he planned to attack the whole gluten-free "fad". He said that he saw it as silly and unscientific. Please remember that I'm paraphrasing something that was said several years ago, over a poor telephone connection, so I am open to correction on the specific words he used, although his meaning was crystal clear.
    I realized that he was determined to undermine much of the work I had done to sound the alarm about the human health hazards posed by gluten consumption. I speculated aloud that he had used the VOIP to make it more difficult for me to detect his duplicity when not telling me what his book project was about during that first call when he asked to interview me. I ended the call and did not respond to the two phone messages he subsequently left for me. He hadn't lied. He just hadn't told the whole truth. He claims, in his book, that exaggeration or distortion is a lie when it comes to science (p. 18). What is it when the distortion is aimed at getting an interview? Is that a lie too? I don't know.
    On the other hand, readers of his book will not suffer any confusion about its author's bias. The title gives adequate forewarning. He begins with the anti-MSG movement, which he describes in detail, beginning in 1968 and extending to a 2013 edition of a reference book where MSG is exonerated as a harmful additive, except in "rare" cases. The implication is clear. Americans condemned and avoided this Japanese flavor enhance for a period of 45 years without what Dr. Levinovitz considers to be good reason. Perhaps some Americans continue to avoid MSG. Dr. Levinovitz says that "Today, food allergy experts believe the overwhelming majority of reactions to MSG are psychological, not physiological." (1 p. 4) I saw this type of statement repeatedly when reading his book. Dr. Levinovitz makes sweeping generalizations for experts in "food allergy" and other such specialist practitioners without any apparent desire to provide a source for these statements of opinion. If his approach is correct, my training has me suffering under the faulty illusion that citing sources is a very important part of science.
    But "what," you may ask, "does MSG have to do with gluten?" Well, it seems that Dr. Levinovitz wants us to conclude that the anti-MSG fad is the same as the shift away from eating gluten grains. He also tells his readers a story about Horace Fletcher and his "theory of mastication," in which a low protein diet is consumed, chewing the food hundreds of times. This, according to Levinovitz, was what led Fletcher to make claims of weight loss and improved health. Levinovitz names several prominent individuals who followed Fletcher's prescription. Then, Dr. Levinovitz discusses epidemiology. Quoting an authority on the subject, who attributes the causal connection of lung cancer to smoking to this type of study. This authority also states that it is exceedingly difficult to establish "credible linkages" in these studies. There is a very good reason for that. Epidemiology may have pointed researchers at smoking as a candidate for causing lung cancer, but this kind of study cannot be used to establish causal relationships. That approach to dietary research is a major source of the many dietary misconceptions that Dr. Levinovitz decries.
    Levinovitz fails to explain just what epidemiology is. It is the study of correlations. During my first year of university, in the 1960s, I was taught that "correlation ‰ causation". This means that simply because two things happen at the same time and place does not mean that they are linked in a causal relationship. For example, drowning deaths can be shown to rise and fall with ice cream sales, and victims of auto accidents usually wear white underwear. Does that mean that ice cream causes drowning deaths? Or that white underwear causes car accidents? Most of us recognize these as foolish claims. Yet that is the type of study that is at the very heart of the epidemiology or "science" that Dr. Levinovitz offers his readers under the heading of "What Real Experts Say about Gluten".
    He claims that "..... after I reveal the myths and superstitions behind fears of gluten, fat, sugar, and salt, you will be less afraid of these vilified foods - and food in general." (1 p.22) He also says that: "..... exaggeration in science is nothing less than a lie" (1 p. 18).
    Lest you begin to fear that Dr. Levinovitz becomes more timid as the book progresses, the first sub-heading in chapter two is "The Gluten Liars" (1 p. 23). He very briefly explains that there are about one percent of Americans, or about 3 million have celiac disease and only 17% have been diagnosed. Thus, 2 and 1/2 million Americans with active celiac disease are, as yet, undiagnosed.
    He goes on to say that "a slightly larger number of Americans" have a condition called non celiac gluten sensitivity, but says that this malady or set of maladies is a "matter of considerable debate". Yet some of the world's foremost experts in gluten sensitivity research (2, 3) publishing in a wide array of journals, have estimated that between 0.5% and 6% of Americans have non celiac gluten sensitivity (2, 3). They define it as a condition in which the person's innate immune system reacts to gluten and causes symptoms similar to those seen in celiac disease. Although it defines a range, it is a number that could stretch to something north of 18 million individuals in the USA alone. Where I come from, that's more than just "a slightly larger number". As Dr. Levinovitz repeatedly admonishes, 'remember, in science, any exaggeration is a lie' (1 p 18).
    But there's more. Levinovitz acknowledges celiac disease (he is unclear about the diagnostic criteria) and non celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) diagnosed on the basis of innate immune reactions to gluten, but he really is missing quite a few people who are gluten sensitive and would, and sometimes do, benefit from a gluten free diet. For instance, when IgG antibodies against gliadin are measured, they show that 10% to 12% of the population is mounting an identifiable, measurable immune reaction to gluten grains. However, these findings are non-specific, so they are not popular with doctrinaire writers such as Dr. Levinovitz. There is also a sub-group of people with schizophrenia who show an immune reaction to transglutaminase 6, another grain-related reaction that is also implicated in some brain disorders (3).
    Dr. Levinovitz presents both Grain Brain by David Perlmutter, M.D., and Wheat Belly, by William Davis, M.D., as irresponsible and alarmist. He then claims that reading such books can "make people physically and mentally ill". That claim falls well short of the scientific standards set by these two anti-grain authors. Levinovitz apparently doesn't see any harm in his sensationalist rhetoric attacking these two physicians for writing within their areas of specialty, yet Dr. Levinovitz's field quite far removed from the laboratory. There is something terribly incongruent here. But what, exactly, does Levinovitz have to teach us about science?
    He wants us to listen to statements he attributes to several authorities. For instance, he quotes Dr. Stefano Guandalini, as an expert in nutrition, saying that the gluten free diet "is not a healthier diet for those who don't need it" p. 29 and later in the same paragraph, Guandalini is quoted as saying "these people are following a fad, essentially" but the reader is left wondering if Dr. Guandalini defined who does or does not need the diet? Such selected quotes can sometimes fail to accurately communicate the meaning of the speaker's comment.
    When I conducted an Internet search for this statement along with Dr. Guandalini's name, I found an article from the New York Times in 2013. The statement appeared to be exactly the one Dr. Levinovitz attributed to Guandalini (p. 29). However, in the NYT article, Dr. Guandalini goes on to say "And that's my biased opinion." That small addition makes a huge difference to the meaning of Dr. Guandalini's statement. I had only read to page 29 of The Gluten Lie when I discovered this deception. And Dr. Levinovitz has the nerve to go around calling others liars? He deliberately withheld the part of Dr. Guandalini's statement that qualified it as his own bias.
    Dr. Levinovitz is certainly teaching us something about gluten lies, but his lessons may not carry the message he wants to disseminate. Levinovitz mentions me in his acknowledgements. At the time of the interview, I told him repeatedly that I had earned a doctoral degree in Education, shortly after the publication of Dangerous Grains. Yet he represents me as having gone back to university to get a Master's degree. I had already accomplished that well before the time Dangerous Grains was published. I now wonder if he made this omission intentionally, especially given his other "oversights" outlined above.
    He also mentions me at several points in his book. He does grant that undiagnosed celiac disease in connection with fibromyalgia, irritable bowel syndrome, diabetes, atopic eczema, and "other related conditions." p. 43 But he insists that only those with these conditions in the context of undiagnosed celiac disease will benefit from a gluten free diet. That's a pretty strong statement. It appears that Dr. Levinovitz has not experienced the challenges of getting appropriate testing for celiac disease, so he doesn't understand.
    Perhaps he missed all the twists and turns that researchers have experienced on their way to choosing villous atrophy as the defining characteristic of celiac disease? He may not realize that the "gold standard" intestinal biopsy was a retrofit added to the diagnostic criteria for celiac disease to counter the widespread resistance to Dr. Dicke's claim that dietary gluten was the cause of celiac disease. Gastroenterologists simply wouldn't believe that gluten could cause celiac disease without some rigorous testing that ultimately excluded many of the folks who were previously diagnosable with this ailment, many of whom died from it. So the diagnostic criteria began with a constellation of gut symptoms, then it relied on an intestinal biopsy showing damage that was reversed by a gluten free diet. Now, those who have the same symptoms, which also respond to a gluten free diet, and who might previously been diagnosed with celiac disease, are now thought to have non-celiac gluten sensitivity.
    The rude dismissal of Dr. Dickie's ideas by American gastroenterologists, signals a dynamic in science that was originally outlined by Thomas S. Kuhn, which Dr. Levinovitz seems to have overlooked. Kuhn's book, The Structure of Scientific Revolutions (7) outlines the process by which scientific revolutions take place. To oversimplify and paraphrase the process, it begins with scientists in that field ignoring the new idea. Then, as it gains credence, the scientists laugh at it. With gaining momentum, the new idea is vigorously opposed. Finally, once widespread acceptance has been gained, the scientists give the impression that they had known this all along.
    Apparently, Elaine Gottshall wrote two books about gluten. I haven't read them. I have heard of them, and some folks swear by them. I don't know about the quality of information she provides. But I know that the information I provided in Dangerous Grains was accurate and it was mostly drawn from the peer reviewed medical and scientific literature, and supported by personal anecdotes from individuals on the celiac listserv. Further, every one of the more than 200 correlations between celiac disease and other ailments was drawn directly from the peer reviewed medical literature. Yet, Dr. Levinovitz lumps us together, saying that "Gottshall and Hoggan deserve our sympathy....." and in the next paragraph: "Sure, they distort the evidence and overstate the dangers of gluten. But is there any harm in that? You bet there is" (1 p. 48).
    So what did I distort? What did I overstate? Does he base his refutation of our ideas on science? His evidence looks a lot less scientific to me. For instance, he claims that "rumors of illness can make you sick" (1 p.50). So it isn't much of a stretch for him to depict specialist physicians such as William Davis, MD, David Perlmutter, MD, and myself (not a physician) as purveyors of illness. Dr. Levinovitz's "science" is made up of the personal bias of Dr. Guandalini, as quoted in the New York Times, gossip from an endocrinologist, more personal opinions from scientists, consensus opinions, and even some opinion statements published in medical journals. For instance, he quotes Jennifer Thomas, a professor of psychology at Harvard Medical School as saying "There are no studies, but anecdotally we see this all the time". She is then quoted as saying "Of course most of my patients are reading these types of books and it definitely concerns me. People can't typically stick to these rigid diets" (1 p. 54). So, if there aren't any studies are we supposed to accept her pronouncements instead? And what harm do these rigid diets do if people can't stick to them?
    Dr. Thomas does grant that "Eating disorders have been around, with or without these food fads, But I still believe that these diets can be a gateway to an eating disorder, and that they can help you maintain it" (1 p. 55). If there aren't any studies, what does she base this belief on? Isn't this the very heart of Levinovitz's argument? Doesn't he say that we should use science, not personal beliefs, to inform our views about diet?
    Then Dr. Levinovitz attacks Dr. Robert Lustig, MD, an endocrinologist. Levinovitz quotes, in his chapter about sugar, gossip from another, nameless endocrinologist who calls Lustig "extreme and opinionated" (1 p.94). Perhaps he is. I don't know Dr. Lustig. However, I do know that Dr. Levinovitz has presented this gossip as "evidence" to further his attack on a group of not just physicians, but specialist physicians who have conducted studies and have done extensive work in their specialty fields. Levinovitz relies primarily on epidemiological studies (the ones that can be used to blame drowning on ice cream sales) expressions of personal bias, published opinion statements, and consensus opinions.
    I believe that Dr. Levinovitz should attack any idea that he believes to be faulty. I believe that he is entitled to believe whatever he believes and shout it from the rooftops if he wishes. But I hope that his readers recognize that he needs more than personal opinions, gossip, sweeping generalizations, and the hyperbole he accuses others of wielding to effectively counter the work of dedicated people who have found answers for themselves and are trying to share them with others.
    His attack on salt misses the more important point that we should be consuming sea salt, not just sodium chloride, to get the salt taste and the nutritional benefits of salt without the possible hazards of too much sodium for those who are sodium sensitive.
    Are there other deceptions in The Gluten Lie? Perhaps. Is there anything of value here? I don't know. I think that we all need to take more responsibility for our own health. I don't know how most of us can do it through reading peer reviewed research articles. They are available but difficult to read without a strong educational background, especially in statistics. Dr. Levinovitz seems like a nice enough fellow except for his tendency to do exactly what he criticizes me and others for... hyperbolizing and twisting the facts to fit his own narrative. He may even have good intentions. It's hard to say. Although his omissions are misleading, I'm not sure whether he really means to mislead, or if his personal bias is so powerful that he is confused about the difference between gossip and evidence; the difference between opinion and data, and; the difference between epidemiology and the various other forms of research designs that can be brought to bear on questions about human nutrition. Whatever the source of his views on the gluten free diet, there doesn't seem to be much actual scientific insight there.
    Sources:
    Levinovitz A. The Gluten Lie And other myths about what you eat. Regan Arts, 65 Bleeker Street, NY, NY 2015. Catassi C, Bai JC, Bonaz B, Bouma G, Calabrò A, Carroccio A, Castillejo G, Ciacci C, Cristofori F, Dolinsek J, Francavilla R, Elli L, Green P, Holtmeier W, Koehler P, Koletzko S, Meinhold C, Sanders D, Schumann M, Schuppan D, Ullrich R, Vécsei A, Volta U, Zevallos V, Sapone A, Fasano A. Non-Celiac Gluten sensitivity: the new frontier of gluten related disorders. Nutrients. 2013 Sep 26;5(10):3839-53. Lebwohl B, Ludvigsson JF, Green PH. Celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity. BMJ. 2015 Oct 5;351:h4347 Cascella NG, Santora D, Gregory P, Kelly DL, Fasano A, Eaton WW. increased prevalence of transglutaminase 6 antibodies in sera from schizophrenia patients. Schizophr Bull. 2013 Jul;39(4):867-71. Leonard MM, Vasagar B. US perspective on gluten-related diseases. Clin Exp Gastroenterol. 2014 Jan 24;7:25-37. http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/02/04/gluten-free-whether-you-need-it-or-not/?_r=0 Kuhn Thomas S. The Structu5re of Scientific Revolutions. University of Chicago. 1962. Aziz I, Lewis NR, Hadjivassiliou M, et al. A UK study assessing the population prevalence of self-reported gluten sensitivity and referral characteristics to secondary care. Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol 2014;26:33-9.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/01/2017 - With low prices and slim margins, life is tough for people who trade in wheat, corn and soybeans these days. So much so that some traders are turning to obscure commodities like desert-grown tomatoes and chickpeas to turn a profit.
    Over the last several years, as farmers have produced far more of these crops than the marker can handle, margins for handling major grain crops have sunk. That has led some trading firms to seek higher margins in niche markets, such as tomatoes and organic grains, while other firms are looking to organic grains, and markets for costlier processed food ingredients or gluten-free products.
    One such company is Germany's BayWa AG. According to Jean-Francois Lambert, the founder and managing partner of consultant Lambert Commodities, "The general trading environment for agricultural commodities is rather difficult," and the challenge looks to continue, at least through next year.
    This fall in prices is a far cry from the price surge seen for much of the previous decade, when growing populations and burgeoning economies drove rising demand.
    Now, really huge firms are unlikely to see much benefit from investing in these smaller markets, no matter the margins. That's because the markets are still too small to have any major impact on their bottom line, and any gains would represent only tiny fractions of their overall portfolios.
    However, small and mid-sized traders can potentially do much better with investments in lesser-known commodities like quinoa or organic crops. For these traders, higher margins and growing demand can yield returns that improve their bottom line. One small company, Grain Services Srl, a brokerage based in Reggio Emilia, Italy, currently receives about 30 percent of its total revenue from gluten-free, organic or niche products, including quinoa, rice, amaranth and lentils, even though these make up just 7% of the firms overall business, says managing director Andrea Cagnolati.
    With prices for gluten-free grains and flours expected to surge over the next ten years, look for more investors to make big bets on that market, or to use it as a hedge against major market doldrums.
    Source:
    ESMMagazine.com

    Jim Swayze
    Celiac.com 09/08/2017 - For for the overwhelming majority of our time here on this planet we've all followed a paleo, or hunter-gatherer, diet. This is not a way of eating invented by the latest Hollywood guru – though truth be told there are now plenty of stars who eat this way. It's common sense, really, if you're able to unlearn a good portion of the dietary wisdom we've been force-fed over the last generation or two.
    Paleo means little more than, in the words of Ray Audette, what you could find to eat if you were "naked with a sharp stick.” And the foods you'd find would have to be, at least in theory (though usually not in practice), edible raw. So what foods would have been available to our ancestors?
    Meat, for sure. There are no known hunter gatherer populations who were vegetarian/vegan. Animal protein is vital to human health. Why then do we hear about healthy vegetarian diets? Because they are healthy as compared to the modern Western diet, with its ubiquitous high fructose corn syrup, artificial fats and sweeteners, and high-glycemic carbohydrates.
    Ok, so animal protein. What else could have been found by our ancestral hunter-gatherers? Fruit and true vegetables, in season.
    That's basically it: meat, fruit, vegetables. And of course, plenty of good, cold water.
    What did we not eat then? Grains in any form, gluten-free or not. Legumes, which are extremely toxic raw and have to be soaked and cooked in order to be edible. (Hint: peanuts are legumes!) New world foods like chocolate, coffee. The list goes on and you should have the hang of it by now. Again, the standard: foods edible raw that would have been available to our ancestors.
    Question: Would dairy have been available to our ancestors? The answer is clearly no, other than in the form of human breastmilk for the first few months or years of life. Bovine milk, meant for calf populations, is not a natural human food.
    Sound overly restrictive? Let me tell you today's menu: For breakfast, three eggs over easy with bacon and a glass of fresh-squeezed orange juice. Lunch was tuna on romaine lettuce with sliced almonds and a vinaigrette with iced green tea to drink. And dinner, a mere five minutes away, is grassfed flank steak lettuce-wrap tacos with roasted hatch green chile guacamole. And a nice glass of New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc.
    Give paleo a try. It's the ultimate gluten-free way of eating.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 12/08/2017 - A quick glance at many pet and livestock food labels will show that they contain corn gluten feed (CGF) and corn gluten meal (CGM).
    But don't worry. Unlike wheat, barley and rye, corn is naturally gluten-free, as are corn gluten feed and corn gluten meal, says Randy Wiedmeier, livestock specialist with University of Missouri Extension.
    Addressing concerns from people with celiac disease and/or gluten-intolerance over the presence of corn gluten in their livestock feed, Wiedmeier stressed that "Corn gluten meal is a byproduct of processing corn. There is no true gluten in corn, but simply corn proteins."
    He stated that he had no idea who came up with the terms corn gluten feed and corn gluten meal, but that they are "obviously misnomers." He added his assurances that it is "perfectly safe to consume meat, milk or eggs produced by farm animals consuming corn gluten feed or corn gluten meal."
    Even if corn gluten contained actual wheat gluten, it would not be a problem, as anything eaten and digested by an animal is absorbed into the animal's body, and "reassembled by the animal's metabolism into proteins specific to that animal, not back into gluten that would show up in the animal products," said Wiedmeier.
    So, if you have celiac disease or gluten intolerance, you don't have to worry if you see corn gluten listed as an ingredient in your favorite pet food or livestock feed. It is corn-based and gluten-free, and is unlikely to harm you or your pet.
    Additional information can be found online at missouri.edu.
    Source:
    Newsleader.com

  • Recent Articles

    Christina Kantzavelos
    Celiac.com 07/20/2018 - During my Vipassana retreat, I wasn’t left with much to eat during breakfast, at least in terms of gluten free options. Even with gluten free bread, the toasters weren’t separated to prevent cross contamination. All of my other options were full of sugar (cereals, fruits), which I try to avoid, especially for breakfast. I had to come up with something that did not have sugar, was tasty, salty, and gave me some form of protein. After about four days of mixing and matching, I was finally able to come up with the strangest concoction, that may not look the prettiest, but sure tastes delicious. Actually, if you squint your eyes just enough, it tastes like buttery popcorn. I now can’t stop eating it as a snack at home, and would like to share it with others who are looking for a yummy nutritious snack. 
    Ingredients:
    4 Rice cakes ⅓ cup of Olive oil  Mineral salt ½ cup Nutritional Yeast ⅓ cup of Sunflower Seeds  Intriguing list, right?...
    Directions (1.5 Servings):
    Crunch up the rice into small bite size pieces.  Throw a liberal amount of nutritional yeast onto the pieces, until you see more yellow than white.  Add salt to taste. For my POTS brothers and sisters, throw it on (we need an excess amount of salt to maintain a healthy BP).  Add olive oil  Liberally sprinkle sunflower seeds. This is what adds the protein and crunch, so the more, the tastier.  Buen Provecho, y Buen Camino! 

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/19/2018 - Maintaining a gluten-free diet can be an on-going challenge, especially when you factor in all the hidden or obscure gluten that can trip you up. In many cases, foods that are naturally gluten-free end up contain added gluten. Sometimes this can slip by us, and that when the suffering begins. To avoid suffering needlessly, be sure to keep a sharp eye on labels, and beware of added or hidden gluten, even in food labeled gluten-free.  Use Celiac.com's SAFE Gluten-Free Food List and UNSAFE Gluten-free Food List as a guide.
    Also, beware of these common mistakes that can ruin your gluten-free diet. Watch out for:
    Watch out for naturally gluten-free foods like rice and soy, that use gluten-based ingredients in processing. For example, many rice and soy beverages are made using barley enzymes, which can cause immune reactions in people with celiac disease. Be careful of bad advice from food store employees, who may be misinformed themselves. For example, many folks mistakenly believe that wheat-based grains like spelt or kamut are safe for celiacs. Be careful when taking advice. Beware of cross-contamination between food store bins selling raw flours and grains, often via the food scoops. Be careful to avoid wheat-bread crumbs in butter, jams, toaster, counter surface, etc. Watch out for hidden gluten in prescription drugs. Ask your pharmacist for help about anything you’re not sure about, or suspect might contain unwanted gluten. Watch out for hidden gluten in lotions, conditioners, shampoos, deodorants, creams and cosmetics, (primarily for those with dermatitis herpetaformis). Be mindful of stamps, envelopes or other gummed labels, as these can often contain wheat paste. Use a sponge to moisten such surfaces. Be careful about hidden gluten in toothpaste and mouthwash. Be careful about common cereal ingredients, such as malt flavoring, or other non-gluten-free ingredient. Be extra careful when considering packaged mixes and sauces, including soy sauce, fish sauce, catsup, mustard, mayonnaise, etc., as many of these can contain wheat or wheat by-product in their manufacture. Be especially careful about gravy mixes, packets & canned soups. Even some brands of rice paper can contain gluten, so be careful. Lastly, watch out for foods like ice cream and yogurt, which are often gluten-free, but can also often contain added ingredients that can make them unsuitable for anyone on a gluten-free diet. Eating Out? If you eat out, consider that many restaurants use a shared grill or shared cooking oil for regular and gluten-free foods, so be careful. Also, watch for flour in otherwise gluten-free spices, as per above. Ask questions, and stay vigilant.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/18/2018 - Despite many studies on immune development in children, there still isn’t much good data on how a mother’s diet during pregnancy and infancy influences a child’s immune development.  A team of researchers recently set out to assess whether changes in maternal or infant diet might influence the risk of allergies or autoimmune disease.
    The team included Vanessa Garcia-Larsen, Despo Ierodiakonou, Katharine Jarrold, Sergio Cunha,  Jennifer Chivinge, Zoe Robinson, Natalie Geoghegan, Alisha Ruparelia, Pooja Devani, Marialena Trivella, Jo Leonardi-Bee, and Robert J. Boyle.
    They are variously associated with the Department of Undiagnosed Celiac Disease More Common in Women and Girls International Health, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America; the Respiratory Epidemiology, Occupational Medicine and Public Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; the Section of Paediatrics, Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; the Centre for Statistics in Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; the Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom; the Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom; and Stanford University in the USA.
    Team members searched MEDLINE, Excerpta Medica dataBASE (EMBASE), Web of Science, Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and Literatura Latino Americana em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS) for observational studies conducted between January 1946 and July 2013, and interventional studies conducted through December 2017, that evaluated the relationship between diet during pregnancy, lactation, or the first year of life, and future risk of allergic or autoimmune disease. 
    They then selected studies, extracted data, and assessed bias risk. They evaluated data using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE). They found 260 original studies, covering 964,143 participants, of milk feeding, including 1 intervention trial of breastfeeding promotion, and 173 original studies, covering 542,672 participants, of other maternal or infant dietary exposures, including 80 trials of 26 maternal, 32 infant, or 22 combined interventions. 
    They found a high bias risk in nearly half of the more than 250 milk feeding studies and in about one-quarter of studies of other dietary exposures. Evidence from 19 intervention trials suggests that oral supplementation with probiotics during late pregnancy and lactation may reduce risk of eczema. 44 cases per 1,000; 95% CI 20–64), and 6 trials, suggest that fish oil supplementation during pregnancy and lactation may reduce risk of allergic sensitization to egg. GRADE certainty of these findings was moderate. 
    The team found less evidence, and low GRADE certainty, for claims that breastfeeding reduces eczema risk during infancy, that longer exclusive breastfeeding is associated with reduced type 1 diabetes mellitus, and that probiotics reduce risk of infants developing allergies to cow’s milk. 
    They found no evidence that dietary exposure to other factors, including prebiotic supplements, maternal allergenic food avoidance, and vitamin, mineral, fruit, and vegetable intake, influence risk of allergic or autoimmune disease. 
    Overall, the team’s findings support a connection between the mother’s diet and risk of immune-mediated diseases in the child. Maternal probiotic and fish oil supplementation may reduce risk of eczema and allergic sensitization to food, respectively.
    Stay tuned for more on diet during pregnancy and its role in celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS Med. 2018 Feb; 15(2): e1002507. doi:  10.1371/journal.pmed.1002507

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/17/2018 - What can fat soluble vitamin levels in newly diagnosed children tell us about celiac disease? A team of researchers recently assessed fat soluble vitamin levels in children diagnosed with newly celiac disease to determine whether vitamin levels needed to be assessed routinely in these patients during diagnosis.
    The researchers evaluated the symptoms of celiac patients in a newly diagnosed pediatric group and evaluated their fat soluble vitamin levels and intestinal biopsies, and then compared their vitamin levels with those of a healthy control group.
    The research team included Yavuz Tokgöz, Semiha Terlemez and Aslıhan Karul. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, the Department of Pediatrics, and the Department of Biochemistry at Adnan Menderes University Medical Faculty in Aydın, Turkey.
    The team evaluated 27 female, 25 male celiac patients, and an evenly divided group of 50 healthy control subjects. Patients averaged 9 years, and weighed 16.2 kg. The most common symptom in celiac patients was growth retardation, which was seen in 61.5%, with  abdominal pain next at 51.9%, and diarrhea, seen in 11.5%. Histological examination showed nearly half of the patients at grade Marsh 3B. 
    Vitamin A and vitamin D levels for celiac patients were significantly lower than the control group. Vitamin A and vitamin D deficiencies were significantly more common compared to healthy subjects. Nearly all of the celiac patients showed vitamin D insufficiency, while nearly 62% showed vitamin D deficiency. Nearly 33% of celiac patients showed vitamin A deficiency. 
    The team saw no deficiencies in vitamin E or vitamin K1 among celiac patients. In the healthy control group, vitamin D deficiency was seen in 2 (4%) patients, vitamin D insufficiency was determined in 9 (18%) patients. The team found normal levels of all other vitamins in the healthy group.
    Children with newly diagnosed celiac disease showed significantly reduced levels of vitamin D and A. The team recommends screening of vitamin A and D levels during diagnosis of these patients.
    Source:
    BMC Pediatrics

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/16/2018 - Did weak public oversight leave Arizonans ripe for Theranos’ faulty blood tests scam? Scandal-plagued blood-testing company Theranos deceived Arizona officials and patients by selling unproven, unreliable products that produced faulty medical results, according to a new book by Wall Street Journal reporter, whose in-depth, comprehensive investigation of the company uncovered deceit, abuse, and potential fraud.
    Moreover, Arizona government officials facilitated the deception by providing weak regulatory oversight that essentially left patients as guinea pigs, said the book’s author, investigative reporter John Carreyrou. 
    In the newly released "Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup," Carreyrou documents how Theranos and its upstart founder, Elizabeth Holmes, used overblown marketing claims and questionable sales tactics to push faulty products that resulted in consistently faulty blood tests results. Flawed results included tests for celiac disease and numerous other serious, and potentially life-threatening, conditions.
    According to Carreyrou, Theranos’ lies and deceit made Arizonans into guinea pigs in what amounted to a "big, unauthorized medical experiment.” Even though founder Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos duped numerous people, including seemingly savvy investors, Carreyrou points out that there were public facts available to elected officials back then, like a complete lack of clinical data on the company's testing and no approvals from the Food and Drug Administration for any of its tests.
    SEC recently charged the now disgraced Holmes with what it called a 'years-long fraud.’ The company’s value has plummeted, and it is now nearly worthless, and facing dozens, and possibly hundreds of lawsuits from angry investors. Meantime, Theranos will pay Arizona consumers $4.65 million under a consumer-fraud settlement Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich negotiated with the embattled blood-testing company.
    Both investors and Arizona officials, “could have picked up on those things or asked more questions or kicked the tires more," Carreyrou said. Unlike other states, such as New York, Arizona lacks robust laboratory oversight that would likely have prevented Theranos from operating in those places, he added.
    Stay tuned for more new on how the Theranos fraud story plays out.
    Read more at azcentral.com.