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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/07/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    HIGH-PROTEIN PLANT-BASED FOODS


    Lisa Cantkier


    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Autumn 2015 Issue - Originally published October 19, 2015


    Celiac.com 02/09/2016 - The top 8 food allergies in Canada are eggs, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, seafood, sesame, soy and wheat. If you have a food allergy and feel limited by it, it's a good idea to explore plant-based options. Plants offer so many benefits—they alkalize your body, reduce inflammation, beef up your vitamin, mineral, phytonutrient, antioxidant and fiber intake, and much more!


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    And if you think that plant-based foods lack protein to get you going and keep you satisfied, guess again! Certain plant-based foods contain all of the essential amino acids we need and can completely replace animal protein.

    Here are four choices that are high in protein and loaded with additional nutrients. Enjoy each one in their whole form in a variety of ways—they are also available in flour form for baking!

    Amaranth

    Amaranth—a gluten-free grain that is high in fiber, manganese, magnesium and calcium—is a complete protein, containing all of the essential amino acids. It actually has more protein than quinoa, gram for gram—one cup of raw amaranth contains 28.1 grams of protein. Another benefit is that it can lower hypertension and cholesterol. Amaranth can be enjoyed as breakfast porridge, in muffins or as a side dish.

    Buckwheat Groats

    Buckwheat is the seed of a fruit in the rhubarb and sorrel family. Another complete protein that does not contain wheat or gluten despite its very misleading name, buckwheat is a great source of folate and zinc, which have both been shown to support fertility/virility in women and men. Both of these nutrients are also excellent for our immune system. Buckwheat is a good source of fiber and magnesium. It can be enjoyed for pancakes, as porridge or a side dish replacement to rice. One cup of raw buckwheat contains 22.5 grams of protein.

    Quinoa

    Quinoa functions like rice. Like amaranth and buckwheat, quinoa is also a complete protein. And like buckwheat, quinoa is technically not a true grain or member of the grass family either. Referred to as a "chenopod," quinoa is related to species such as beetroots, spinach and tumbleweeds. In addition to protein, quinoa contains many nutrients, including fiber, manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, folate, iron and zinc. Quinoa can be served in its whole form as a main or side dish, and quinoa flour is great in baked goods. One cup of raw quinoa contains 24 grams of protein.

    Teff

    Good things come in small packages! Last but not least, teff is the smallest grain in the world. Teff contains many amino acids and is high in protein—it just isn't a complete protein. It contains an excellent source of calcium, magnesium, zinc and iron, which are all important for immune function. Teff can be eaten as a hot cereal and is also available as tortilla wraps. One cup of raw teff contains 25.7 grams of protein.


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    admin

    The term gluten in reference to the cohesive, elastic protein mass remaining after starch is washed from a dough goes back to Beccari in 1745. Strictly speaking, gluten is found only in wheat because it is difficult to wash a cohesive protein mass even from rye, the closest relative to wheat, let alone from barley or oats or anything else. Unfortunately, a misuse of the term by the corn industry has become common in recent years. It has become fairly common to call corn storage proteins corn gluten. Personally, I think there is no justification for such usage. Corn may contain prolamins, as does wheat, but not gluten.
    When it comes to celiac disease, a similar corruption of the term has become very common. There are certain related proteins in wheat, rye, and barley that give rise to particular peptides during digestion that are capable of triggering the responses typical of celiac disease. Only in the case of wheat can these be strictly considered to be derived from the gluten proteins. But for lack of a suitable term, patients and their physicians began speaking of gluten-free or gluten-containing foods. People ask me, How much gluten is there in quinoa? I have to translate this into, Are there any harmful peptide sequences in the proteins of quinoa? There is nothing in quinoa that is like gluten prepared from a wheat flour dough, which has an unusual, perhaps unique, viscoelastic character.
    In any case, as far as we know, corn does not seem to cause harm to celiac patients. Corn has not been studied in the extensive way that wheat has in relation to celiac disease, but for 40+ years patients and their physicians have seemed to agree that corn is OK. The sequences in the corn zein (prolamin) fraction are suspicious, but they do differ in an apparently crucial way from the protein sequences of the wheat gliadin (prolamin) fraction. There have been no modern biopsy-based studies of the effects of purified corn proteins on the celiac intestine as there have been for wheat, but the mass of evidence still seems to point in the direction of corn being safe for celiac patients.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 10/05/2012 - Buckwheat flour significantly improves the nutrition and texture in gluten-free breads, according to a new study published in the journal Food Hydrocolloids. The study examines the role of buckwheat and hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) in making gluten-free breads.
    The researchers point out that the food industry has cleared numerous formulation hurdles associated with removing gluten from dough, and created numerous new gluten-free products. However, they add, many gluten-free breads are still made with pure starches, "resulting in low technological and nutritional quality."
    The research team included M. Mariotti, M. Ambrogina Pagani and M. Lucisano. They are affiliated with the Department of Food Science and Technology and Microbiology (DiSTAM) at the University of Milan.
    In their study, they found that high levels of buckwheat flour improves both the texture and nutrition of gluten-free breads.
    Their findings showed that including up to 40% de-hulled buckwheat flour improved the leavening characteristics and overall quality of gluten-free breads.
    Because it is high in dietary fiber, the buckwheat flour increases dough viscosity, along with "the swelling and gelling properties of the buckwheat starch and the emulsion-forming and stabilizing properties of the globulin protein fraction,” the researchers wrote.
    The study also found that bread crumbs in gluten-free bread made with buckwheat flour and the food additive HPMC were softer than in gluten-free bread made without buckwheat flour.
    For their study, the research team evaluated ten bread formulas, 2 commercial, 8 experimental, with varying levels of buckwheat flours and HPMC. These formulas used both de-hulled and puffed buckwheat flour. The team based all experimental formulas on recipes from the two commercial samples.
    The formula that yielded the most favorable gluten-free bread included, 40% de-hulled buckwheat flour, 5% puffed buckwheat flour and 0.5% HPMC.

    Source:
    Journal of Food Hydrocolloids doi: 10.1016/j.foodhyd.2012.07.005

    Sheila Hughes
    Celiac.com 05/14/2013 - Despite the fact that millet is more nutritious than wheat, as well as other gluten-free grains, modern science lacks the processing technologies to manufacture it on a large scale. Millet is an age-old grain, however we have yet to harness its full potential due to this drawback.
    The preparation of millet includes fermentation, decortication, milling, and sieving. Most of millet being processed today is currently being down on a household level in rural areas, and due to this fact its availability is limited in urban areas. Another challenge with increasing millet production is making sure the nutritional properties are not depleted during the process.
    Current health benefits of millet include high anti-oxidants which could mean a reduced risk of cancer. It is also used more and more in diabetic products because it is high in polyunsaturated fat.
    While there currently isn't a system to produce millet on a large scale, there is research being done in this area. Perhaps in the near future we will see this grain being produced on the scale needed to make it common place in gluten-free products.
    Source:
    http://www.bakeryandsnacks.com/R-D/Millet-promise-stopped-short-by-processing-shortfalls-review

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/04/2014 - Many people looking for gluten-free grains that pack a big punch turn to ancient grains like quinoa, sorghum, and millet. Now, more and more people are expanding that list to include teff, the ancient grain that is a staple in the Ethiopian culture.
    In fact, in some circles, teff is being called the next rival to quinoa. That may be due in part to the Ethiopian government's campaign to promote teff to western markets. The main selling points are that teff is gluten-free and nutritious, rich in amino acids, protein, iron and calcium. Teff also makes a good substitute for wheat flour in many recipes.
    These facts, along with plans by the Ethiopian government to double the production of teff by next year could help feed the growing global demand for gluten-free grains.
    I've known about teff since around the turn of the century. There was, and I think still is, a great little Ethiopian restaurant in town that, with a few days advance notice, would make injera, the spongy traditional bread using pure teff and no wheat. Their food was delicious, and I've remembered teff fondly ever since then.
    Source:
    WIKIPEDIA

    Amie  Valpone
    Celiac.com 04/05/2016 - These fresh-tasting burgers make an easy weeknight meal. No buns here; you can serve these wrapped in romaine or Bibb lettuce leaves and eat them with your hands. Make sure your millet isn't too dry or the burgers won't stick together!
    Serves 6
    Ingredients:
    1 cup millet ½ teaspoon sea salt, plus a pinch for cooking millet 1 tablespoon ground flax seeds 3 tablespoons water 1 large carrot, peeled and grated 4 scallions, thinly sliced 1 handful fresh basil leaves, finely chopped 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice 2 ½ teaspoons freshly grated lemon zest ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 3 tablespoons coconut oil 6 large romaine or Bibb lettuce leaves 1 recipe Mango Salsa, for serving Large drizzle Cumin Cashew Cream Sauce, for serving Directions:
    Cook the millet with a pinch of salt. Set aside to cool.
    Combine the flax seeds and water in a small bowl; set aside for 10 minutes until the mixture forms a gel, then mix well.
    While the millet is cooking, combine the carrots, scallions, basil, lemon juice, lemon zest, salt, and pepper in a large bowl. Once the millet is cool, add it to the bowl with the flax seed mixture and mix well. Using your hands, shape the mixture into six burgers.
    In a large skillet, heat the oil over medium heat. Place the burgers in the pan and cook until golden brown, 7 to 8 minutes on each side. Serve warm wrapped in lettuce leaves with a dollop of Mango Salsa and a drizzle of Cumin Cashew Cream Sauce on top. Uncooked burgers will keep for up to 4 days in the refrigerator or 1 month in the freezer, stored between pieces of parchment paper in a sealed container.
    Mango Salsa
    Makes 1 ½ cups
    Ingredients:
    1 ripe mango, peeled, pitted, and finely diced 1 medium English cucumber, finely diced 3 tablespoons finely diced red onion 3 teaspoons finely chopped fresh cilantro 2 teaspoons freshly squeezed lime juice Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste Directions:
    Combine all of the ingredients in a large bowl; toss to combine, and serve. Add more red onion, if desired, for a spicier salsa. Serve immediately.
    Cumin Cashew Cream Sauce
    Makes 1 ½ cups
    Ingredients:
    1 cup raw cashews
    ¾ cup water
    ¼ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
    ½ teaspoon ground cumin
    ¼ teaspoon sea salt
    Directions:
    Combine all of the ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth. Serve chilled or at room temperature. Store leftover sauce in a sealed container in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.
    Text excerpted from EATING CLEAN, © 2016 by AMIE VALPONE. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. Author/Recipe photo © LAUREN VOLO.

    Tina Turbin
    Celiac.com 05/17/2016 - The paleolithic diet, or paleo diet which happens to be gluten-free, has been growing increasingly popular among athletes and health advocates, but it has a history dating back to the mid-1970's as a means of preventing diseases and health conditions such as autoimmune diseases and cancer, when investigations were made of the eating patterns of our hunter-gatherer ancestors.
    The paleo gluten-free diet, the "biologically appropriate" diet, is named for the Paleolithic era, which extended 2.5 million years ending in 10,000 B.C. with the advent of agriculture and animal husbandry. It's comprised of the foods our human ancestors consumed during this period, namely wild-caught fish, grass-fed meats, fruits, vegetables, roots, and nuts. Any "modern" foods introduced from the agricultural era forward such as grains, dairy, sugar, and processed foods are eliminated.
    People all over have found the paleo gluten-free diet is an effective answer for weight loss, optimizing health and fitness—and building muscle tone. According to research, pre-agricultural humans were free of the diseases of the civilized world such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, obesity, and autoimmune diseases. Modern studies, including clinical studies, have shown as well that the paleo diet and the restoration of the lifestyle conditions of our ancestors, such as exercise, have resolved numerous diseases.
    The theory behind the diet, supported by extensive archeological and anthropological evidence, is based on the premise that modern humans do best on paleolithic nutrition because human genetics have largely remained the same since the pre-agricultural era and thus our genetic makeup is best suited to the ancestral human diet.
    If you're looking to build muscle tone, meet with a qualified health practitioner to see if the diet is for you. I think you'll find that whatever your reason for starting the paleo diet and lifestyle, whether to optimize your fitness routine, lose weight, alleviate autoimmune disease symptoms such as celiac disease, or increase your longevity, eating in the biologically appropriate way for our bodies not only has the power to change your body and your health, but your quality of life.
    While many people are eating paleo gluten-free as a way to correct health conditions or improve their overall health, active individuals and athletes have been following the diet in order to lose fat and build muscle more efficiently, according to MuscleMag.
    In fact, one of the best known proponents of the paleo diet, Robb Wolf, former biochemist and author of The Paleo Solution, regards the diet as performance-enhancing and trains world-class athletes at his gym in Chico, California.
    According to Robb, our human ancestors were taller, leaner, and better built than humans now, as anthropological evidence shows us. According to MuscleMag, only during the last 10,000 years, since the advent of agriculture, have humans consumed grains, legumes and dairy—and during this same period, humans have also become "significantly shorter, fatter, less muscular and more prone to disease," as anthropological studies point out. Let's take a look at some of the reasons why the paleo gluten-free diet is optimum for building muscle tone.
    The paleo gluten-free diet, consisting wholly of unprocessed foods like seafood, lean meat, fruits and vegetables, nuts and roots, is much more nutritious than the foods from the Neolithic era and beyond. The optimal nutritional intake on the paleo gluten-free diet is a vital part of developing muscle tone.
    Although you'll hear grain advocates singing the praises of the fiber and B vitamin content of grains, you'll actually find more of these nutrients in grain-free foods, as long as you eat a variety of nutrient-rich whole foods. According to GrainFreeLifestyle.com, "If you can find the nutrient in grain, you can find the nutrient in better quantities in other foods." For example, 100 grams of whole wheat flour contains 44 mcg of folate, but a 100-gram serving of lamb liver yields 400 mcg of folate and a 100-gram serving of yard-long beans offers 658 mcg. Also, 100 grams of cooked brown rice has 1.8 grams of dietary fiber, whereas a 100-gram serving of cooked collard greens has 2.8 grams and green peas offer approximately 5 grams of fiber per serving.
    In fact, grains that are poorly prepared, which is most often the case, can prevent the absorption of vitamins and minerals. Your diet may be rich in nutrients, but if it's also rich in improperly prepared grains, you won't be able to absorb them due to substances in grain such as phytic acid, which binds with minerals so you can't absorb them properly.
    Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye. The paleo diet is a naturally gluten-free diet because it is a grain-free diet. Studies show that 1% of the population has celiac disease, an autoimmune condition triggered by the ingestion of gluten, which causes the immune system to attack the lining of the digestive tract and inhibits the proper absorption of nutrients from your food.
    But experts are saying that a large proportion of non-celiac individuals are suffering from gluten intake as well. Some researchers estimate that as much as 40% of the population is also sensitive or downright intolerant to gluten, which can lead to the same symptoms and conditions of celiac disease. Celiac disease and gluten sensitivity are severely undiagnosed, and it could be the case that you yourself have gluten issues.
    Not only grains but other Neolithic and modern foods, such as legumes, dairy products, sugar, and processed oils can irritate the digestive tract as well. For example, legumes contain antinutrients such as lectins, saponins, and protease inhibitors, which cause damage to the intestines and hormonal and immune systems, leading to inflammation and increasing the risk of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. All soy products and peanuts are actually classified as legumes and are to be avoided on the paleo gluten-free diet.
    With intestinal inflammation, nutrient absorption is severely limited, especially when it comes to protein. Furthermore, the inflammatory response in the gut can spread throughout the body. This systemic inflammation can lead to the retaining of water as well as weakening the immune system, while a strong immune system is vital when it comes to recovering from intense exercise and building muscle.
    Let's dive into how to get superior sources of protein, weaning off of detrimental grains and improve muscle tone and exercise recovery time in the next issue.

    Tina Turbin
    Celiac.com 06/07/2016 - Where are all my Mexican food lovers? This one is especially for you. These Mexican stuffed zucchini boats are a perfect gluten-free party dish. You can cut them up into smaller pieces and serve them as a tray snack that is nutritious and protein packed. I don't know about you but I love when I go to a party and there are plates of healthy items to snack on. I never feel good filling up on just potato chips and veggie sticks. Junk food makes you feel pretty junky.
    I really enjoy hosting get togethers at my house. Since I am a mom of three "kids" and am a grandmother as well, I tend to have a full house and like to make healthy gluten-free and sugar-free snacks and meals for my friends and family. No matter how old your kids get, they still always love coming over for a homemade meal. My youngest son is a mexican food "junkie" and really likes this recipe even though it is grain-free as well. He doesn't mind at all giving up the corn tacos. You can change the heat level to whatever you desire too. As always, my recipes are for you to enjoy and alter for whatever suits your taste and likes.
    Ingredients:
    4 large organic green zucchinis ½ pound ground free-range turkey, chicken or grass-fed beef 4 slices Canadian bacon ½ small white onion, chopped fine ½ cup Salsa Verde (no preservatives) 1-1/4 cup chopped cilantro 3 tablespoons coconut oil or olive oil 1-2 tablespoons chili powder 1 tablespoon tabasco sauce (or to taste) 1 teaspoon salt or to taste 1 teaspoon pepper or to taste Optional: Grass-fed cheese Directions:
    1. Preheat the oven to 400F.
    2. Cut each zucchini lengthwise down the middle, to make 2 halves from each.
    3. Take an apple corer and remove the inside, but be careful not to cut into the dark green. Leave about â…› inch on sides and bottom. This will be your "boat".
    4. Take the zucchini pulp and chop semi fine.
    5. Heat 1 tablespoon oil on medium until hot.
    6. Add the onion and cook until semi-glossy then add the zucchini pulp and saute for 1 minute. You may add some tabasco at this point if you like spicy or hot.
    7. Transfer to a deep bowl.
    8. Add 1 tablespoon of oil to the same pan and heat oil on medium.
    9. Add ground meat and cook until done.
    10. Add to bowl with onions and zucchini.
    11. Drain all but 1 tablespoon of the juices and oils and sauté Canadian bacon in same pan until slightly browned.
    12. Remove bacon to cutting board - slice into small slices.
    13. Add to same bowl.
    14. Add Salsa Verde, cilantro, chili powder, Tabasco and salt and pepper to taste.
    15. You may add shredded cheese at this point if you desire.
    16. Mix all ingredients.
    17. Stuff the boats with the mixture and pile them nice and high, then stack them close to one another in a baking dish so they stand upright.
    18. Cover with tin foil.
    19. Bake for 30 minutes.
    20. Remove and let sit still while covered for 5 minutes.
    21. If you have extra meat mixture, you may heat the leftover meat as well in the oven.
    22. You may serve a little extra protein on the side of each boat with a garnish of cilantro and a touch of hot sauce.
    23. Enjoy!

    Tina Turbin
    Celiac.com 06/23/2016 - This is a very versatile gluten-free recipe. This paleo and gluten-free brownie pie crust can be made into a crust or simply eaten as gluten-free cookies. It is also totally OK to consume it raw since it is made out of all vegan ingredients. Based on the feedback I've received, it tastes delicious when prepared raw.
    This crust/cookie recipe is a wonderful base to build upon. I create a lot of raw cheesecakes with the crust and any leftovers are made into little cookies for later. The chocolate flavor in this is quite light so it won't overpower the other flavors you may want to work in with it.
    The only piece of machinery required is a food processor and this healthy recipe comes together easily. Nuts are the real star of this recipe though. I purchase nuts in bulk since I use them for homemade nut milk as well as many baked items and as an on-the-go snack. Certain nuts offer a variety of health benefits you would have never even thought of. Almonds for example, which are used in this recipe, rank highest out of all tree nuts in protein, fiber, calcium and vitamin E. Enjoy!
    Ingredients:
    2 cups almonds 1 cup pecans or walnuts 1 ½ cups dates, chopped ¼ cup 100% cacao powder 2 teaspoons vanilla extract ¼ teaspoon salt 2-4 teaspoons water Directions:
    Preheat oven to 325F degrees. Place almonds in food processor and grind until somewhat fine. Add pecans or walnuts and grind until somewhat fine. Add the remaining ingredients excluding water. Pulse in the food processor. Add water until mixture isn't flaky, just until dough holds slightly together. Line a 9” spring form pan with waxed paper. Add dough mixture to the pan and spread over the top of the paper. If you are doing crust up the sides of the pan, you will need to line the sides of the pan as well. Press firmly. Bake for 15-17 minutes. OPTIONAL: do not bake if you are on a raw diet. Enjoy!  

    Tina Turbin
    Celiac.com 07/05/2016 - This is hands down one of the easiest and most loved weekend recipes I whip up. Healthy, protein packed, sugar-free, gluten-free, paleo and satisfying. When I have the entire family over they always request this easy sausage and peppers recipe. It works for brunch, lunch or even dinner. I must warn you though, this will go fast. Make plenty of extra so you have leftovers as this gluten-free recipe is delicious heated back up.
    If I have everyone over for brunch I will usually make a homemade frittata to go with this or some sweet potato breakfast potatoes. Even my two Maltese pups go crazy over the aroma that emanates from my kitchen. They are always predictably there under my feet just in case "something" happens to drop.
    You can make this ahead of time, then heat it up in an oven safe dish too so you are not so rushed on the day of your get together.
    Enjoy!
    Ingredients:
    1 orange pepper 2 yellow peppers 2-3 packages of sausages (12-18 ounce packages) 2-4 tablespoons Olive oil Note: Green peppers are okay to use as well. Directions:
    Slice sausage 2-3 inches in thickness, diagonal cut is fine. Clean and then cut the peppers. Cut into 1-2 inch pieces. Heat large skillet with olive oil. Add sausage 2 cups at a time so as not to crowd. Stir now and then until they appear a tad bit charred. Add more oil only as necessary. Remove and do this with all of the sausage. Set all aside on paper towels to drain and pat with paper towel lightly. Add peppers to the same oil until they start to soften. Place all in a large, heat-proof skillet. Cover with tin foil. Place in oven for 30 minutes. Remove and serve. Enjoy! NOTE: can be served as a protein side to main dish; excellent for BBQ type meals and sit-down dinners.
    NOTE: Can be prepared days in advance. If so, place in fridge covered. Remove about 5 hours before eating time. Place in preheated oven at 350F for 40 minutes.
     

    Miranda Jade
    Celiac.com 12/23/2016 - The air is crisp and my lips keep getting chapped. Must mean it is time for the holidays! I am not a fan of pumpkin but I do love the taste of butternut squash. I could eat butternut squash soup every day and never get sick of it.
    Our holidays are not quite as traditional as most. When I was younger we did the turkey, ham, stuffing, etc. As we got older and honestly a little sick of those items, we started to come up with more exciting menu items for the special holidays. For example, this year we plan on BBQing some fresh caught cedar planked fish and ribs and everyone is bringing some delicious sides and treats to go with the protein while we open up presents. I really hope someone makes this as a side because I will be back for 2nds and 3rds.
    This butternut squash soufflé is so light and fluffy and is completely gluten-free and grain-free. It also can be made totally dairy-free. If you have any guests with allergies, this is a pretty safe recipe that everyone can enjoy.
    I hope you enjoy it with your family and loved ones as much as I will be.
    INGREDIENTS:
    1 large butternut squash (to yield 3 ½ to 4 cups cooked pulp) 4 eggs, separated 3-4 tablespoons cinnamon 2 tablespoons butter or coconut oil, melted (1 tablespoon is for the soufflé dish) 3 teaspoons lakanto or sweetener of choice 1 teaspoon cream of tartar or 2 teaspoons lemon juice Soufflé dish with sides 5 to 7 inches tall DIRECTIONS:
    Preheat oven to 350F degrees. Cut the squash in pieces and place in a steamer basket with two inches of water and cover. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to a high simmer. Cook until very soft. Let cool slightly. Take the skins off and use 3 to 3 ½ cups of the squash. Place the squash in a bowl. Add the melted butter, cinnamon and sweetener of choice Blend with n upright blender or hand mixer (such as a Magic Bullet) until very smooth. Take only 2 egg yolks and slowly add in once the mixture is very smooth. In a separate bowl take 4 egg whites and 1 teaspoon of cream of tartar or 2 teaspoons of lemon juice and whip your egg whites until stiff. If yours do not rise, not to fret! Whip until very frothy, and it will still turn out fine. Gently fold the squash mixture into the whites. Melt 1 tablespoons of butter and spread throughout the inside of soufflé dish. Place greased soufflé dish in preheated oven for 3 to 5 minutes at the most, then remove from oven. Pour souffle mixture into hot dish and place in the center of the oven. Oven rack should be placed accordingly to allow this. Bake 17 to 20 minutes or longer, if necessary, until soufflé rises and firms up without becoming crusty.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/09/2017 - It's cheaper, more nutritious, and properly delicious. Will gluten-free flour made from cockroaches change the way bread is made?
    There's a great article over at Munchies. It's about two scientists from the Federal University of Rio Grande in Brazil, who have developed flour made from ground cockroaches that contains 40 percent more protein than normal wheat flour. Oh, and it happens to be gluten-free. Excited yet? Grossed out?
    As part of their research, food engineering students Andressa Lucas and Lauren Menegon discovered a new way of producing cheaper, more nutritious food with the cockroach flour, since it contains a large amount of essential amino acids and some lipids and fatty acids as well—the keys for a balanced and healthy human diet.
    These cockroaches are not the ones we find running or flying in city sewers or drains. They are a particular species, Nauphoeta cinerea, to be precise, and procured from a specialized breeder, where they are hygienically produced and fed on fruits and vegetables to meet all hygiene requirements required by ANVISA, the Brazilian health surveillance agency.
    So, these are certified clean cockroaches, okay? And not only is the flour itself gluten-free, it's extremely high protein. Lucas and Menegon found that a bread containing just 10% cockroach flour presented a protein increase of 49.16 percent, when compared to bread made only with wheat flour. Also, at that ratio, the cockroach flour bread loaves keep the same flavor as their non-insect counterparts.
    So, given the high protein, and the desirable elastic qualities, it seems a natural for someone to test out some gluten-free breads that use cockroach flour. We promise you updates on these and other gluten-free stories. Meantime? Tell us what you think. It obviously sounds gross, but what if cockraoch flour makes good gluten-free bread? Are you in or out?

    Leszek Jaszczak
    Celiac.com 07/08/2017 - The most frequently used materials in the baking industry are wheat, rye, and barley flours. However, due to the presence of gluten, they cannot be used for gluten-free food production. Gluten-free products are characterized by a low content of nutrients such as protein and minerals which are important for meeting normal physiological requirements. In addition, these products are readily available and the taste is far different from typical bread. [Marciniak-Åukasiak K., M. concentrate Skrzypacz gluten-free bread with amaranth flour in foods. Science. Technology. Quality, 2008, 4 (59), 131 - 140]. These issues raise the need for finding new raw materials for bread production, which would improve the nutritional value and sensory experience [Wolska P., CegliÅ„ska A., Dubicka A. 2010. Manufacture of bread for gluten-free cereal żurkach. FOOD. Science. Technology. Quality, 2010, 5 (72), 104 – 111]. Due to the low intake of foods rich in essential nutrients and minerals, people with celiac disease are seeking supplements to avoid deficiencies.
    Buckwheat, is an alternative raw material that can be used for production of gluten-free foods and has generated a growing interest. However, the scientific research regarding these crops is scarce [Zmijewski M. dough and bread quality wheat and buckwheat, depending on the technology food additives. Science. Technology. Quality, 2010, 5 (72), 93 - 103]. Common Buckwheat (Fagopyrum esculentum) although it does not require any complicated or unusual cultivation practices, it is rarely cultivated by farmers. Buckwheat is now grown in areas of Russia, China, Brazil, and Poland. The energy value of buckwheat is higher than the other grains such as wheat and rye. It is a good source of saccharides and proteins with well-balanced amino acid composition. It also contains high levels of lysine, fats, vitamins and minerals. It is also characterized by a significant amount of dietary fiber of varied fractional composition and biologically active compounds.
    Specific levels depend on the variety, anatomical part, climate, and growing conditions. These factors also effect the content of biologically active substances, such as flavonoids and routins, thought to have health promoting effects on the human body. Buckwheat is also the source of many compounds with antioxidant effects, which are: tocopherols, quercetin, kaempferol, and phenolic acids [Krzysztof Dziedzic et al, Content of antioxidants in buckwheat and products made in the processing, Food. Science. Technology. Quality, 2009, 6 (67), 81 – 90]
    The protein content of buckwheat is from 8.5 to 18.9%, depending on the species. Buckwheat protein has a high nutritional value. Its value is higher than pork protein, casein, fish meal and a bit lower than egg white. The scientific literature reports that extracts of buckwheat protein can successfully be used as a functional food additive for the treatment of diseases such as hypertension, obesity, cancer, and alcoholism. Scientists studying buckwheat demonstrate its beneficial effects on human health: buckwheat proteins prevent the formation of gallstones, they have the ability to bind vitamin B1, contribute to the prevention of colon cancer and breast cancer. In addition, buckwheat protein does not contain α-gliadin fraction, allowing buckwheat products to be successfully used in the production of food for people with celiac disease [M. Zmijewski, Jakość ciasta i chleba pszenno-gryczanego w zależnoÅ›ci od dodatków technologicznych żywność. Nauka. Technologia. Jakość, 2010, 5 (72), 93 – 103]
    Technological processes used in the production of buckwheat have a significant impact on the content of antioxidant compounds. The highest content of phenolic compounds are found in grains of buckwheat after roasting and the lowest in whole buckwheat groats. Buckwheat hulls have lower level of these compounds compared with buckwheat before the roasting process. Routin is an antioxidant compound present in the largest amounts in the above product. [Krzysztof Dziedzic et al, Content of antioxidants in buckwheat and products made in the processing, Food. Science. Technology. Quality, 2009, 6 (67), 81 – 90].
    Manufacture of bread with only buckwheat flour is impossible due to the lack or very low level of gluten proteins. Recipes that use buckwheat flour are enriched with corn starch, which replaces wheat flour. Such raw materials compositions are used in the production of bread for people with celiac disease. Complete removal of wheat flour results in the dough deterioration and structure for baking. Crumb color changes from cream to gray, the taste and smell is unpleasant when compared with traditional bread. In order to improve these defects some additives are used from dairy products such as milk and whey, which improve the quality of the bread [Jurga R., 2008. Wykorzystanie mÄ…ki gryczanej przy produkcji chleba pszennego. Przegl. Zboż.--MÅ‚yn. 11: 18]. Products with roasted buckwheat flour stand out, with clear and distinct flavors of buckwheat, due to the higher content of dextrin, sugar and pectin [Wronkowska M., Soral-Åšmietana M., 2008. Buckwheat flour – a valuable component of gluten-free formulations. Pol. J. Food Nutr. Sci. 58: 59-6].
    Studies indicate that gluten free bread with buckwheat added is characterized by an increased volume compared with traditional recipes. The result may be affected by other components in particular hydrocolloids. Loaves with more buckwheat content are characterized by greater height and size. The loaf shape will also vary depending on the addition of buckwheat flour [Krupa-Kozak Urszula et al J. Food Sci. Vol 29, 2011, No. 2: 103-108 Effect of Buckwheat Flour He Contents icroelements and Proteins in Gluten-Free Bread].
    Enriching with common buckwheat flour, rich in protein and minerals, gives a positive effect on the content of important ingredients. As reported by the literature, add 10% buckwheat flour, by weight, to a typical bread recipe and you will double the content of protein in the product. Further increasing the buckwheat portion of the flour recipe resulted in further significant increases in protein content. Buckwheat flour also increases the copper and manganese content. Buckwheat grains are a good source of micronutrients and trace elements such as zinc, selenium, potassium, sodium, calcium, magnesium. Adding buckwheat also increases the amount of vitamins, especially of the B group. A valuable component of buckwheat grain is the flavonoid rutin. It has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. It seals blood vessels, prevents capillary fragility and reduces the risk of atherosclerosis [urszula Krupa-Kozak, Margaret and Wronka owska and Maria Soral-cream Czech J. Food Sci. Vol 29, 2011, No. 2: 103-108 Effect of Buckwheat Flour He Contents icroelements and Proteins in Gluten-Free Bread].
    Buckwheat's high fiber content is also beneficial for the human body, a role that has only recently been appreciated. The fiber content of bright wheat flour is about 2.5%, while in buckwheat flour it is about 6.8%. Dietary fiber increases the volume of food intake, while not increasing the energy value, which is especially important for people who are overweight or obese. This substance reduces the feeling of hunger and acts as a filler in the gastrointestinal tract. Fiber also binds cholesterol, which indirectly reduces its level in the bloodstream. In addition, fiber absorbs harmful substances such as heavy metals, toxic components of plant antinutrients, and the products of their metabolism [Magdalena Fujarczuk, MirosÅ‚aw Å»mijewski Jakość pieczywa pszennego w zależnoÅ›ci od dodatku otrÄ…b pochodzÄ…cych z różnych odmian gryki żywność. Nauka. Technologia. Jakość, 2009, 6 (67), 91 – 101].
    In buckwheat nuts, valuable antioxidants such as flavonoid compounds and phenolic acids can be detected, which obstruct free radical reactions and inhibit oxidative enzymes. Due to its high antioxidant capacity and a significant share of the total pool of flavonoids, phenolic compounds, buckwheat products can provide a valuable complementary component of the gluten free diet [WpÅ‚yw obróbki termicznej na skÅ‚ad chemiczny i wÅ‚aÅ›ciwoÅ›ci przeciwutleniajÄ…ce ziarniaków gryki; żywność. Nauka. Technologia. Jakość, 2007, 5 (54), 66 – 76 StempiÅ„ska Karolina et al]
    Traditional food can be enriched by buckwheat bran containing protein, fiber, B vitamins and minerals. Buckwheat may well be a functional food ingredient. It is also a noteworthy possibility to use buckwheat as a component of a prebiotic. The presence of flavonoids in buckwheat can be used by the pharmaceutical industry.
    In summary, buckwheat flour as an additive increases and improves the nutritional value and technological parameters of bakery products. It has a positive effect on the volume and shape of the loaves. Usage of these grains increases the flour's content of minerals such as copper, manganese, iron and zinc [Krupa-Kozak Urszula et al Buckwheat Flour Effect of a Microelements and Protein Contents in Gluten-Free Bread, Czech J. Food Sci. Vol 29, 2011, No. 2: 103-108]. However, when creating new products with health promoting features, we have to remember the consumer's preferences, especially in relation to the textural characteristics of bakery products. [Dziedzic K. et al 2010. The possibilities of using buckwheat in the production of functional foods. Science inc. Technol. 4, 2, # 28]

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 11/15/2017 - Quinoa is regarded as safe for people with celiac disease. For many years, some celiac support groups listed quinoa as unsafe due to cross-contamination concerns. But any grain is unsafe for celiacs if it is contaminated with wheat, rye or barley. Some grains have a higher risk of such contamination, others have a low risk.
    Based on its low risk for cross-contamination, Celiac.com has had quinoa on our safe list since 1995. A vast amount of evidence supports that listing.
    The latest research shows that celiac patients can safely tolerate up to 50 g of quinoa daily for 6 weeks. The researchers in this test point out that further studies are needed to assess long-term effects of quinoa consumption. In the short-term test, the researchers looked at 19 treated celiac patients who ate 50 g of quinoa every day for 6 weeks as part of their regular gluten-free diet.
    The team evaluated diet, serology, and gastrointestinal parameters, and made histological assessments of 10 patients, both before and after they consumed quinoa. The results show that celiac patients seem to tolerate quinoa well, and it doesn't trigger any symptoms or cause any gut damage or dysfunction. The team found normal gut structure and mucosa to confirm that assessment.
    In fact, patients saw a general improvement histological and serological results, so better gut conditions and less blood antibodies to gluten in patients who ate quinoa. Celiac patients who ate quinoa for 6 weeks also experienced a mild reduction in blood pressure.
    Overall, this is the first clinical study to show that celiac patients can safely tolerate up to 50 g of quinoa daily for 6 weeks.
    Obviously, future studies need to look at the safety of long-term quinoa consumption. That said, quinoa seems to be safe for celiac patients on a gluten-free diet.
    If you really want to be sure, quinoa grown in main producer countries of Bolivia, Peru and Ecuador, where practically no wheat is grown, is probably the safest bet for those on a gluten-free diet.

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/23/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to learn whether celiac disease patients commonly suffer cognitive impairment at the time they are diagnosed, and to compare their cognitive performance with non-celiac subjects with similar chronic symptoms and to a group of healthy control subjects.
    The research team included G Longarini, P Richly, MP Temprano, AF Costa, H Vázquez, ML Moreno, S Niveloni, P López, E Smecuol, R Mazure, A González, E Mauriño, and JC Bai. They are variously associated with the Small Bowel Section, Department of Medicine, Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital; Neurocience Cognitive and Traslational Institute (INECO), Favaloro Fundation, CONICET, Buenos Aires; the Brain Health Center (CESAL), Quilmes, Argentina; the Research Council, MSAL, CABA; and with the Research Institute, School of Medicine, Universidad del Salvador.
    The team enrolled fifty adults with symptoms and indications of celiac disease in a prospective cohort without regard to the final diagnosis.  At baseline, all individuals underwent cognitive functional and psychological evaluation. The team then compared celiac disease patients with subjects without celiac disease, and with healthy controls matched by sex, age, and education.
    Celiac disease patients had similar cognitive performance and anxiety, but no significant differences in depression scores compared with disease controls.
    A total of thirty-three subjects were diagnosed with celiac disease. Compared with the 26 healthy control subjects, the 17 celiac disease subjects, and the 17 disease control subjects, who mostly had irritable bowel syndrome, showed impaired cognitive performance (P=0.02 and P=0.04, respectively), functional impairment (P<0.01), and higher depression (P<0.01). 
    From their data, the team noted that any abnormal cognitive functions they saw in adults with newly diagnosed celiac disease did not seem not to be a result of the disease itself. 
    Their results indicate that cognitive dysfunction in celiac patients could be related to long-term symptoms from chronic disease, in general.
    Source:
    J Clin Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 1. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0000000000001018.

    Connie Sarros
    Celiac.com 04/21/2018 - Dear Friends and Readers,
    I have been writing articles for Scott Adams since the 2002 Summer Issue of the Scott-Free Press. The Scott-Free Press evolved into the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. I felt honored when Scott asked me ten years ago to contribute to his quarterly journal and it's been a privilege to write articles for his publication ever since.
    Due to personal health reasons and restrictions, I find that I need to retire. My husband and I can no longer travel the country speaking at conferences and to support groups (which we dearly loved to do) nor can I commit to writing more books, articles, or menus. Consequently, I will no longer be contributing articles to the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. 
    My following books will still be available at Amazon.com:
    Gluten-free Cooking for Dummies Student's Vegetarian Cookbook for Dummies Wheat-free Gluten-free Dessert Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Reduced Calorie Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Cookbook for Kids and Busy Adults (revised version) My first book was published in 1996. My journey since then has been incredible. I have met so many in the celiac community and I feel blessed to be able to call you friends. Many of you have told me that I helped to change your life – let me assure you that your kind words, your phone calls, your thoughtful notes, and your feedback throughout the years have had a vital impact on my life, too. Thank you for all of your support through these years.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/20/2018 - A digital media company and a label data company are teaming up to help major manufacturers target, reach and convert their desired shoppers based on dietary needs, such as gluten-free diet. The deal could bring synergy in emerging markets such as the gluten-free and allergen-free markets, which represent major growth sectors in the global food industry. 
    Under the deal, personalized digital media company Catalina will be joining forces with Label Insight. Catalina uses consumer purchases data to target shoppers on a personal base, while Label Insight works with major companies like Kellogg, Betty Crocker, and Pepsi to provide insight on food label data to government, retailers, manufacturers and app developers.
    "Brands with very specific product benefits, gluten-free for example, require precise targeting to efficiently reach and convert their desired shoppers,” says Todd Morris, President of Catalina's Go-to-Market organization, adding that “Catalina offers the only purchase-based targeting solution with this capability.” 
    Label Insight’s clients include food and beverage giants such as Unilever, Ben & Jerry's, Lipton and Hellman’s. Label Insight technology has helped the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) build the sector’s very first scientifically accurate database of food ingredients, health attributes and claims.
    Morris says the joint partnership will allow Catalina to “enhance our dataset and further increase our ability to target shoppers who are currently buying - or have shown intent to buy - in these emerging categories,” including gluten-free, allergen-free, and other free-from foods.
    The deal will likely make for easier, more precise targeting of goods to consumers, and thus provide benefits for manufacturers and retailers looking to better serve their retail food customers, especially in specialty areas like gluten-free and allergen-free foods.
    Source:
    fdfworld.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/19/2018 - Previous genome and linkage studies indicate the existence of a new disease triggering mechanism that involves amino acid metabolism and nutrient sensing signaling pathways. In an effort to determine if amino acids might play a role in the development of celiac disease, a team of researchers recently set out to investigate if plasma amino acid levels differed among children with celiac disease compared with a control group.
     
    The research team included Åsa Torinsson Naluai, Ladan Saadat Vafa, Audur H. Gudjonsdottir, Henrik Arnell, Lars Browaldh, and Daniel Agardh. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Karolinska University Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institute, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Diabetes & Celiac Disease Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; and with the Nathan S Kline Institute in the U.S.A.
    First, the team used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to analyze amino acid levels in fasting plasma samples from 141 children with celiac disease and 129 non-celiac disease controls. They then crafted a general linear model using age and experimental effects as covariates to compare amino acid levels between children with celiac disease and non-celiac control subjects.
    Compared with the control group, seven out of twenty-three children with celiac disease showed elevated levels of the the following amino acids: tryptophan; taurine; glutamic acid; proline; ornithine; alanine; and methionine.
    The significance of the individual amino acids do not survive multiple correction, however, multivariate analyses of the amino acid profile showed significantly altered amino acid levels in children with celiac disease overall and after correction for age, sex and experimental effects.
    This study shows that amino acids can influence inflammation and may play a role in the development of celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/18/2018 - To the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service animals.
    If you’ve flown anywhere lately, you may have seen them. People flying with their designated “emotional support” animals. We’re not talking genuine service animals, like seeing eye dogs, or hearing ear dogs, or even the Belgian Malinois that alerts its owner when there is gluten in food that may trigger her celiac disease.
    Now, to be honest, some of those animals in question do perform a genuine service for those who need emotional support dogs, like veterans with PTSD.
    However, many of these animals are not service animals at all. Many of these animals perform no actual service to their owners, and are nothing more than thinly disguised pets. Many lack proper training, and some have caused serious problems for the airlines and for other passengers.
    Now the major airlines are taking note and introducing stringent requirements for service animals.
    Delta was the first to strike. As reported by the New York Times on January 19: “Effective March 1, Delta, the second largest US airline by passenger traffic, said it will require passengers seeking to fly with pets to present additional documents outlining the passenger’s need for the animal and proof of its training and vaccinations, 48 hours prior to the flight.… This comes in response to what the carrier said was a 150 percent increase in service and support animals — pets, often dogs, that accompany people with disabilities — carried onboard since 2015.… Delta said that it flies some 700 service animals a day. Among them, customers have attempted to fly with comfort turkeys, gliding possums, snakes, spiders, and other unusual pets.”
    Fresh from an unsavory incident with an “emotional support” peacock incident, United Airlines has followed Delta’s lead and set stricter rules for emotional support animals. United’s rules also took effect March 1, 2018.
    So, to the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service and emotional support animals.
    Source:
    cnbc.com