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    Food Cravings, Obesity and Gluten Consumption by Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


    Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

    Celiac.com 07/10/2006 - Increased consumption of gluten, according to Dr. Michael Marsh, raises the risk of celiac disease symptoms1. Although these symptoms may not indicate celiac disease, they reflect some biological realities. Grain-based foods simply do not offer the nutrients necessary to human health and they damage the human body. USDA and Canada Food Guides notwithstanding, if people eat grain-laden diets, they may develop symptoms of celiac disease (but in most cases, without the diagnostic intestinal lesion). The connection between eating disorders and celiac disease is well known and well documented2,3,4,5. Thus, the dynamics at work in celiac disease may offer insight into the broader realm of obesity, especially among those who are eating the recommended, daily quantities of grain-derived foods, while attempting to keep their weight down by eating low-fat foods.

    The primary, defining characteristic of celiac disease is gluten induced damage to the villi in the intestinal lining. Since malabsorption of vitamins and minerals are well known in the context of celiac disease, it should not be surprising that some celiac patients also demonstrate pica (Pica is an ailment characterized by eating dirt, paint, wood, and other non-food substances). Other celiac patients eat excessive quantities of food, coupled with a concurrent failure to gain weight. Yet another, perhaps larger, group of celiac patients refuse to eat (One may wonder if the latter find that eating makes them feel sick so they avoid it).

    Perhaps the most neglected group is that large portion of untreated celiac patients who are obese. Dr. Dickey found that obesity is more common than being underweight among those with untreated celiac disease6. When I ran a Medline search under the terms "obesity" and "celiac disease" 75 citations appeared. A repeated theme in the abstracts and titles was that celiac disease is usually overlooked among obese patients. While obesity in celiac disease may be common, diagnosis appears to be uncommon. Given the facts, I certainly believe that some of the North American epidemic of obesity can be explained by undiagnosed celiac disease. However, that is only a small part of the obesity puzzle, and I suspect that celiac disease may offer a pattern for understanding much of the obesity that is sweeping this continent.

    One example, a woman diagnosed by Dr. Joe Murray when he was at the University of Iowa, weighed 388 pounds at diagnosis7. Dr. Murray explained her situation as an over-compensation for her intestinal malabsorption. I want to suggest a two faceted, alternative explanation which may extend to a large and growing segment of the overweight and obese among the general population. As mentioned earlier, anyone consuming enough gluten will demonstrate some symptoms of celiac disease. If large scale gluten consumption damages the intestinal villi—but to a lesser degree than is usually required to diagnose celiac disease—fat absorption will be compromised. Deficiencies in essential fatty acids are a likely consequence.

    The natural response to such deficiencies is to crave food despite having absorbed sufficient calories. Even when caloric intake is huge, and excess calories must be stored as body fat, the need to eat continues to be driven by the bodys craving for essential fats. Due to gluten-induced interference with fat absorption, consumption of escalating quantities of food may be necessary for adequate essential fatty acid absorption. To further compound the problem, pancreatic glucagon production will be reduced, compromising the ability of the individual to burn these stored fats, while the cells continue to demand essential fats.

    Poor medical advice also contributes to the problem. The mantra of reduced fat continues to echo in the offices of health professionals despite a growing body of converse research findings. In February of this year, the results of a powerful, eight year study of almost 49,000 women showed little difference between the health of women consuming low fat diets when compared to those consuming normal diets8. Alarmingly, this low fat diet seems to have resulted in weight gain, a well recognized risk factor for a variety of diseases.

    For some of us, this result was predictable. The likely result of a low-fat diet is an increased intake of carbohydrates while food cravings are fuelled by a deficiency of essential fatty acids. If my sense of the underlying problem (caloric excess combined with essential fatty acid deficiency due to fat malabsorption at the microvilli) is accurate, then a low fat diet is exactly the wrong prescription. Many obese persons are condemned, by such poor medical advice, to a life of ever deepening depression, autoimmune diseases, and increasing obesity.

    At the end of the day, when these folks drop dead from heart attacks, strokes, or some similar disaster, the self-righteous bystanders will just know that the problem was a lack of willpower.

    I watched my mom steadily gain weight for 35 years. I watched her exercise more will power beyond the capacity of most folks. Still, she could not resist her compulsive eating. I have seen her take something from the freezer and chew on it while agreeing that she had just eaten a very large meal and should feel full.

    In December of 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease. According to the published experts in this area, my mom should also have been invited for testing. Yet, when asked for testing, her doctor refused her. Through persistence, and a pervasive faith in her son, mom finally (after months of negotiation) swayed her doctor to do the anti-gliadin antibody blood test. Despite the fact that she had been on a reduced gluten diet for the past year, her antibody levels were elevated.

    She never sought a biopsy diagnosis, and the EMA and tTG were not available here in Canada at that time. However, she has been gluten-free for the past seven years or so. She dropped a considerable amount of weight.

    Her weakness was never will power. She was battling an instinct so basic that few of us could have resisted. That, I think, is the story behind much of North American obesity. The widespread, excessive consumption of gluten at every meal, in addition to the low-fat religion that has been promulgated throughout the land, is resulting in intestinal damage and a widespread deficiency in essential fats is among North Americans.

    Ron Hoggan is an author, teacher and diagnosed celiac who lives in Canada. His book "Dangerous Grains" can be ordered at www.celiac.com. Rons Web page is: www.DangerousGrains.com

    References:

    • Marsh, Michael N. Personal communication. 2002.
    • Ferrara, et. al. "Celiac disease and anorexia nervosa" New York State Journal of Medicine 1966; 66(8): 1000-1005.
    • Gent & Creamer "Faecal fats, appetite, and weight loss in the celiac syndrome" Lancet 1968; 1(551): 1063-1064.
    • Wright, et. al. "Organic diseases mimicking atypical eating disorders" Clinical Pediatrics 1990; 29(6): 325-328.
    • Grenet, et. al. "Anorexic forms of celiac syndromes" Annales de Pediatrie 1972; 19(6): 491-497.
    • Dickey W, Bodkin S. Prospective study of body mass index in patients with coeliac disease. BMJ. 1998 Nov 7;317(7168):1290.
    • Murray, J. Canadian Celiac Association National Conference. 1999.
    • Howard BV, Van Horn L, Hsia J, et. al. Low-fat dietary pattern and risk of cardiovascular disease: the Womens Health Initiative Randomized Controlled Dietary Modification Trial. JAMA. 2006 Feb 8;295(6):655-66.
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    Guest Teresa Huffman

    Posted

    I have been overweight since I was a teenager. Just got diagnosed with ceilac disease last year in January . I was in a coma for 4 days and in hospital almost a month and in a rehab hospital for almost a month and was not able to walk or talk. I had lost weight to 176 lbs going in to hospital, and now I have gained up to 330lbs. and I am very depressed. I can't understand why some people lose weight on a gluten free diet while it caused me to gain so much weight. So not all people are alike.

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    I found this article informative and well-written. As an individual with gluten sensitivity and a constellation of attendant problems (morbid obesity, hypoglycemia, cognitive impairment, ADD, chronic, treatment-resistant depression, excema and hives, just to name a few) I found conventional 'dieting' plans (such as Weight Watchers) an easy way to actually gain weight, instead of losing it. It wasn't until I removed from my diet all wheat and 'white stuff'-- white flour, sugar, white rice, and the like-- that I began to lose weight. During the first four months on a restricted food plan I lost 40 pounds. I also experienced extreme withdrawal-- quitting cigarettes was a walk in the park compared to this. Headaches. Cravings. Flu-like symptoms. And mood swings? I felt like I'd had all my skin ripped off and was walking around with all my nerve endings exposed. I was irritable, angry, or sad for no reason. Holding a simple conversation was an ordeal. I wouldn't wish it on my worst enemy, When withdrawal eventually ended, the weight loss didn't. I lost 103 pounds in 18 months, and for almost two years until, I spectacularly 'fell off the wagon' (it involved half a sheet cake-- don't ask), kept it off. It took almost three years, and 100 pounds regained, to reestablish a steady footing on the food plan (worked out with a nutritionist) but the weight gain (100 pounds) stopped and I have started to lose (20 so far) again. But the gluten-free diet is key to having no food cravings to distract me, and keeping my brain clear. Mr. Hoggan has addressed an under served audience with this article.

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    This article has hit home with me as well. I have watched the same symptoms in my father. I have celiac and he refuses to get tested. I hope this may have an influence on him as well. Thank you for writing informative articles.

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    Guest Stephanie Morey

    Posted

    I found this very informative! Thank you so much! I haven't been diagnosed with celiac, but I visited my mom's naturopathic doctor and she recommended switching to a gluten-free lifestyle. I've been digging around trying to find the connection to obesity (which I am). This article has been very eye-opening and hopefully in a few months I'll be able to report back with my success story. Thanks again for posting this!

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    Guest Marie Zarankevich

    Posted

    Your view of this malady is refreshing, and I was delighted to find something which was not just a repetition of Mayo data. Four generations of my family have or had Celiac, some of them died from it. Nobody knew what was wrong. It's such a relief just to be able to move around again, and think clearly. Keep up your good research, and I'll keep up mine. I think the grains were the god's answer of how to control us after the Tower of Babel story.

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    Guest Colleen MacDonell

    Posted

    This tells a story that is so common. Desire to eat without appetite. Give up gluten and your desire disappears. Very important message.

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    Guest citykatmm

    Posted

    I think this is a very logical explanation for obesity. However, I am anorexic and I just found out I have celiac disease. Somehow the two are related but there is the very strong psychological portion of the eating disorder that is present. I don't think celiac disease causes anorexia nervosa. Interestingly though, I have both anorexia nervosa and celiac in my family background. I have been looking for more research on this and I can't find a lot. It is mostly about celiacs who become anorexic. There must be some component to the anorexia though, or else everyone who was celiac would becaome anorexic. I would be interested to find out any more information.

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    Guest Carla

    Posted

    Thank you so much for this! It all makes so much sense, especially when put together with all my other symptoms. This has really motivated me to get serious about my health and get the gluten out!

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    Guest Marie Zarankevich

    Posted

    I am now responding to response number 7. Celiac disease gives a person tremendous amounts of gas. My aunt died as an anorexic, partly because she could no longer bear being a lady, and being so flatulent as well. To her, it was disgusting. It destroyed her joy in living.

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    Guest KWHudson

    Posted

    I have battled compulsive cravings my whole life. I have been gluten-free for a short while now and no longer have stomach upset or cravings, and my innards feel different, 'lighter' or something. This may sound strange but I feel FREE. You couldn't pay me to eat a bagel or pizza or crusty french bread, I feel much too good. I didn't even realize just how terrible I felt when I was eating gluten. My overweight daughter exhibits severe cravings, and we are weaning her off of gluten now. You are ON to something here, for a large portion of us I suspect. Keep up the good work, and THANK YOU!

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  • About Me

    As co-author of "Dangerous Grains" and "Cereal Killers", the study of the impact of gluten continues to be a driving passion in my life. I am fascinated by the way that gluten induces illness and impedes learning while it alters mood, behavior, and a host of other facets of our existence. Sure, the impact of gluten on health is an important issue, but that is only the most obvious area of impact. Mood disturbances, learning disabilities, and the loss of quality of life due to psychiatric and neurological illness are even more tragic than the plethora of physical ailments that are caused or worsened by gluten. The further I go down this rabbit hole, the more I realize that grains are a good food for ruminants - not people. I am a retired school teacher. Over the last decade, I have done some college and university level teaching, but the bulk of my teaching career was spent working with high school students. My Web page is: www.DangerousGrains.com

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