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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/07/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    DID YOU KNOW? (SPRING 2015)


    Yvonne (Vonnie) Mostat


    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2015 Issue - Originally published April 8, 2015


    Celiac.com 01/05/2016 - Did you know that an important step for the celiac and gluten sensitive person occurred on September 30, 2014? Jennifer North, Vice-President of the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA) delivered the following comments to the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA), Food Advisory Committee on behalf of those living with gluten disorders:


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    "My name is Jennifer North. I am the Vice President of the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness. I represent approximately 21 million people who require the gluten-free diet for health reasons including those with celiac disease, a genetic autoimmune disease that could lead to cancer, infertility and recurrent miscarriage and the onset of other autoimmune diseases if left undiagnosed or untreated.

    The NFCA is an evidence-based organization with an international, medical, and scientific advisory council. We just completed a FDA grant to research the impact of gluten in medication. We provide accredited gluten-free training to over 1000 learners from over 180 restaurants and colleges each year.

    Our media campaigns introduced the idea that the gluten-free diet is not a fad, but in fact a medical necessity for those with celiac disease and other gluten-related disorders to nearly a quarter of a billion people thus far in 2014.

    We secured the Associated Press' big story of the day on August 5, the compliance date of the gluten-free labeling rule. We also hosted two free webinars on the topic, one including Suzanne Walker, a representative of the FDA as a presenter. As a passive observer it may seem that life has never been better for people looking for gluten-free options. Despite the growth of the marketplace to over $20 billion dollars annually and the availability of gluten-free food in gas stations and convenience stores, the gluten-free diet is proving to be emotionally and logistically difficult to navigate.

    The gluten-free community lives in fear of food every day. Their concerns have a basis. Research from the Mayo Clinic shows that nearly 70 percent of people with celiac disease, who maintain a gluten-free diet, continue to have intestinal damage from inadvertent gluten exposure. Last week, the NFCA engaged 350,000 people in a social media dialogue about getting gluten in restaurants. Eating remains the most critical quality of life issue affecting the gluten-free community today. A recent study of disease treatment burden found that the gluten-free diet has an equivalent burden as those with end-stage renal failure rate dialysis. I hope you find that as shocking as we do and we find it unacceptable.

    We salute the FDA for finalizing the gluten-free labeling rule which was mandated as part of FALCA and protects consumers whose health is dependent on access to safe gluten-free food. I am here today to ask for your support in seeking clarity from the FDA about references to the obligations of restaurants and food service operators in meeting the requirements of the ruling in order to make a gluten-free menu claim.

    The health of those with celiac disease and nonceliac gluten sensitivity depends on food service operators being educated and transparent. We welcome the efforts of the FDA in acting to protect our interests.

    However, FALCA is designed for packed foods and was vetted by the packaged foods industry. The regulation not only centers around the prohibition of gluten-containing ingredients but also requires the validation that contamination of gluten-free products does not exceed 20 parts per million of gluten residue.

    The FDA's statements in its Q&A and its guidance documents state that while the ruling applies to packaged products, it does expect restaurants to comply. It also states that it may engage state and local bodies and enforcing the ruling in the food service setting. This is problematic because the restaurant setting is not typically closed and well-controlled and predictable system where testing of samples is representative of the overall risk. It is not cost effective for restaurants to test every dish between the kitchen and the table and effective testing for gluten residue requires advanced technical knowledge. With ambiguous language and lack of specific guidance for the food service sector many restaurant operators are holding back on labeling gluten-free items or are using terminology that confuses consumers like low gluten, gluten friendly or gluten-free ingredients.

    To back up what we are hearing anecdotally we launched a survey in which nearly 150 responses were received from a wide variety of operators representing all geographies in the US. The majority of respondents were individual owner/operators, but multi-unit regional chains, colleges and universities and K-12 school districts also responded.

    Our findings show that 89 percent of respondents either believe the ruling applies to them or are unsure whether or not it applies to them, 12 percent report that the gluten-free label rule will change their menu claims and more than a third are unsure what to do with their menu claims.

    While we certainly want to discourage restaurants who are unable to safely and consistently offer gluten-free dishes from doing so, our survey shows that even restaurants who have in-depth knowledge and training and strict controls in place are unclear about whether or not they are able to continue to identify gluten-free dishes to their own customers. We are concerned that this will limit

    accessibility of gluten-free friend and quash the great strides we have made in bringing gluten-free food safety to the forefront of the food service industry by working with the largest manufacturers and distributors in the space, a group of loyal chef ambassadors and partner organizations like the National Restaurant Association.

    Please stand with us as we seek formal guidance from the FDA that will provide a basis of understanding for how to expect food service operators to legally and responsibly serve those who must adhere to the gluten-free diet for medical reasons. "

    Exciting News! The NFCA also has a concise small "Dining Out Tips" card for the celiac that you can get on their web site NFCA Celiac Central. On the right side of the card there is a tear-off section to leave with the restaurant to recommend that they get gluten-free training for the management and staff. Or try their "10 Tips for Resilient Solutions". And while I am on a role regarding information cards, visit glutenfreeandmore.com to purchase Casein-Free Dining Cards, but remember casein-free diets may remove adequate calcium and vitamin D from your diet, and if you have not been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorders, have no further issues as long as you strictly follow your gluten-free diet the casein free diet may not be for you.

    The person who becomes lactose intolerant is the one still eating gluten, where after the villi and microvilli in the small intestine have become so damaged they are no longer capable of catching and breaking down the lactose molecule. The problem usually disappears when a celiac removes gluten totally from their diet thus enabling the damaged villi and microvilli to grow back. Remember that lactose intolerance symptoms can continue for a long time after a celiac has gone on a 100% gluten-free diet. (In some cases the villi and microvilli damage can take up to two years to heal completely—Scott Adams, founder and publisher of this Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.)

    The NFCA is a major advocate for the consumer with regards to better labeling, and regarding medications, "Legislation and regulation can provide the path for ensuring that consumers have the information they need to make healthy choices". Under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA), OTC medications must list inactive ingredients on the container, and prescription drugs must include a description of the medication, which includes inactive ingredients, in the package insert, but although the inactive ingredients must be disclosed, the source of the ingredients and the potential allergens in them do not need to be clearly named. Common food allergens (like peanuts, milk, eggs, soy, gelatin, and fish) can hide in a medication's excipients, which are inactive or filler ingredients used to provide shape or bulk and sometimes to aid in absorption. These allergens do not need to be specifically identified. For example, "starch" can be corn, potato, tapioca or wheat starch, according to Alice Bast, president of the National Foundation fort Celiac Awareness We are advised to stay with the same Pharmacy and work closely with your doctor and pharmacist. If your medication does not have a package insert ask for one, or an information sheet, and read it watching out for the word "starch".

    There are some free websites that can help you or your pharmacist track down details on your drugs. DailyMed (dailymed.nim.nih.gov) allows you access to manufacturers to see full prescribing information, Orange Book helps determine if two products, (a generically named drug vs. the officially prescribed drug name) are therapeutically equivalent (www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cder/ob). GlutenFreeDrugs.com, a website maintained by pharmacist Steve Plogsted of Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio, identifies which drugs should be safe for those avoiding gluten.
    I also contacted Health Canada, Media Relations Unit (613) 957-2983 with regard to food labeling, not only for pre-packaged foods but also to enquire if we are intending to follow the United States Gluten-free Labeling Rule Clarification. In Canada the Federal Government and Provincial Governments share the responsibility of consumer protection regarding food allergies (www.inspection.gc.ca/food-labelling/eng/1299879892810 - 613-957-2983). The drug safety e-mail and toll-free number is info@hc-sc.gc.ca and 1-866-225-0709. It is Eastern Standard Time so calling from the West Coast needs to be before 3:00 p.m. There is a Canadian Food Inspection Agency for B.C. at (604) 292-5700. They are responsible for enforcing regulations with regards to inspection and labeling of foods in the industry (gluten-free claims, allergen free claims, and policy updates: www.inspection.gc.ca/foodlabelling/cooflabelllingforindustry). The person I am dealing with to try to make sense out of our resolutions is andre.gagnon@hc.sc.ca, and he has promised to get back to me with regards to my numerous questions.

    It was December 2002 when Food & Drug Regulations were amended to make nutrition labeling mandatory on 'most' food labels. It became mandatory in December 2007 to comply with new regulations regarding pre-packaged foods, and that was for small businesses, who now NOTED the fact that Canada's list of priority food allergens differs from that of the U.S.A., Canada's largest trading partner. If you are planning to shop in Canada it is important to familiarize yourself with the differences regarding per-packaged gluten-free food, including wholesale foods.

    Restaurant regulations are provincially mandated in Canada,. That means if you are planning on stopping at an "eat and run" fast food restaurant in B.C. (chains or franchises) its regulations with regards to floured french fries vs. pure gluten-free fries, should be the same as Ontario regulations, as will the oil in which they are fried. You may not be able to find a gluten-free cookie or bar in every franchised store; that is their prerogative. I do not know if every Woods Coffee & Sandwich Shop in the U.S.A. carries gluten-free sandwiches, buns and cookies but they do in the Washington area. The old rule of "asking" and "Caveat emptor" applies. If you don't ask how the sandwiches are made you run the risk of being "glutened" at a health cost to you.

    The U.S. may also have concerns about packaged foods coming into the United States from other countries such as Mexico, India and China having their ingredients listed in the language of their native country, and your food choice "gets lost in translation". I did address that inquiry to our local bodies here in Canada and also to Claude Gagnon at the Ministry of food and agriculture in Ottawa, also listing training for restaurant staff, separate sites for preparation, precautions regarding cross-contamination and depending on how long their "leave a message" line was available to me I kept going.

    In 2012 detailed regulations officially mandated and greatly clarified the disclosure of priority food allergens in foods offered for sale in Canada. Any food ingredient sourced from a 'priority food allergen' must declare the allergen by its official name, either within the list of ingredients or in a "Contains" disclosure at the end of the ingredients list on the product label. This necessitates reading the list of ingredients with its declaration of the allergies and reading down to, or searching for, the disclosure at the end of the ingredient list on the product label. I have not found that all products list the "contains" disclosure at the end of the ingredients list, but do place it somewhere on the product label, which can, when speed shopping, cause errors.

    This is why you have to watch thickening agents, sauces, soy sauce (switch to Tamari) nearly everything needs to be carefully checked out. Corn starch is a great thickener for gravies or sauces. There is a product here in Canada called Veloutine, a sauce thickener, which comes in brown or white and is gluten-free. You are better off switching from sugar to honey whenever you can as sugar depresses the immune system and encourages the growth of candida and the unhealthy bacteria. Honey supports the immune system and the good bacteria but does not support the unhealthy bacteria and candida very well.

    Did you know that some anti-caking agents may contain wheat? Check your herbs and spices, especially if they come in a counter friendly rack. Watch the ground spices in particular and avoid the ones which state "Contain wheat products" warning. The Gluten-free Watchdog founded by Tricia Thompson (https://www.glutenfreewatchdog.org) has a new report on spices; it will also tell you the difference between the words 'spices' and 'seasonings' and how it might affect a celiac. Agriculture & Agri-Food Canada actually has a "Gluten-Free Claims in the Market Place" brochure which is free of charge (www.agr.gc.ca/food/glutenfree). Different statistics are as confusing to us as they are to you. Mother Earth News (www.motherearthnews.com) say as of September 2013 the gluten-free products in Canada were a $90 million dollar enterprise, and in the U.S.A. the market was valued at $4.2 billion and climbing. That is not very far from the Rockville, MD based Research Firm which projected $5.5 billion by 2015.

    Did you know that with regards to foods that contain casein not all celiac people need to go out and buy coconut milk or soy milk? Scott Adams, the founder of "Celiac.com," says "the fact that lactose intolerance is frequently a side effect of celiac disease. Celiac's who eat gluten become lactose intolerant after the villi and microvilli in their small intestine have become damaged, and are no longer capable of catching and breaking down the lactose molecule. He states that the problem usually disappears when celiacs remove gluten from their diet. Which allows the damaged villi and microvilli to grow back. Lactose intolerance however, can continue for a long time after a celiac has gone on a 100% gluten-free. It "can" in some cases up to two years to heal completely. In most cases it takes between six months and a year.

    Another site for people who are gluten-free and dairy free, other than our own web site, is About.com. Nancy Lapid explains the connection in language that you can understand. These two references contained the best descriptions of the celiac disease/lactose intolerance link. It is not something that you can diagnose and handle alone. Those of you who have been taking OTC "Lactaid" long before you were diagnosed with celiac disease need to be evaluated soon! Guidance from a qualified physician or nutritionist is strongly advised. You will either hear or read that casein is like a drug and can cause withdrawal symptoms and a list of complaints that will elevate your blood pressure! Get your facts straight before going on an elimination diet or adding dairy-free to your already difficult diet.

    Children with autism frequently seem addicted to wheat (gluten) and dairy (casein) products. Some people with autism and schizophrenia may be incompletely digesting wheat and dairy proteins. These incompletely digested peptides are then absorbed into the body and bind to opiate receptors altering behavior and other physiological reactions. Common symptoms of withdrawal toxification from gluten-derived opioid and brain neurochemical imbalances. The evidence suggests that about 70% of celiac patients will experience these symptoms when starting a strict gluten-free diet. There is the addictive nature of gluten which is often overlooked. There are common symptoms of withdrawal or detoxification from gluten-derived opiates and a brain neurochemical imbalance.


    Image Caption: Photo: CC--Ian Parkes
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    Guest Alta Walters

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    Generally good, with one exception. I do not think it is helpful to over blow the disability impact of celiac disorder. Many of us lead full (if cautious) lives, even eating out, from time to time. Frankly, having to cook on a regular basis is a health benefit. So, to have celiac compared, in any way, to end stage renal failure, is the kind of sensationalism that, over the long haul, hurts the cause.

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    Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.
    January 9, 1999 post by Ron Hoggan to the Celiac Listserv:
    Im posting this response to the list as this information may not be common knowledge in the celiac community, and perhaps it should be. There are a number of reports, regarding celiac patients, of coexisting intolerance to milk proteins. One recent report was of an investigation for cross reacting antibodies. They found none, but a number of these patients displayed antibodies against gliadin and parallel anticasein antibodies (1). Another group has indicated that 36% to 48% of celiac patients demonstrate antibody reactions to milk proteins (2), although there are some reports that the frequency of such sensitivities reduce with treatment of a gluten-free diet (3), although the latter publication reported a higher initial frequency of reactions to milk proteins. There is another report of one celiac patient thought to have refractory sprue who recovered with the additional dietary exclusion of egg, chicken, and tuna (4). The patient became very ill before the possibility of immune reactions to other dietary proteins was considered. These reports suggest to me that we need to be vigilant about the possibility of additional food sensitivities. Before leaping to the use of steroids, further antibody testing seems prudent. The therapeutic use of systemic steroids carries the potential for some very dangerous side effects. Dietary exclusion of allergenic proteins, on the other hand, is just an inconvenience, one that most of us are already well versed in. ELISA or similar testing ought to be done prior to beginning steroids, as such drugs may be unnecessary, or they may compromise the accuracy of such testing.
    Sources:
    Paranos S, et al. Lack of cross-reactivity between casein and gliadin in sera from coeliac disease patients. Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 1998 Oct;117(2):152-4. Volta U, et al. Antibodies to dietary antigens in coeliac disease. Scand J Gastroenterol. 1986 Oct;21(8):935-40. Scott H, et al. Immune response patterns in coeliac disease. Serum antibodies to dietary antigens measured by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Clin Exp Immunol. 1984 Jul;57(1):25-32. Baker AL, et al. Refractory sprue: recovery after removal of nongluten Dietary proteins. Ann Intern Med. 1978 Oct;89(4):505-8.

    admin
    This article comes to us from Karoly Horvath, M.D., khorvath@POL.NET, who is one of the two directors of the celiac center at University of Maryland in Baltimore.
    Breast milk contains antibodies against all the antigens the mothers immune system has met prior to or during the pregnancy and has produced antibodies to them.
    This system is the wisdom of nature and this is the way that mothers milk protects babies from all the antigens (infectious agents, toxins etc.) occurring in the environment where the mother lives. These antigens without this protection may enter the body through the digestive or respiratory systems. The best example is that breast milk protects babies from bacteria causing diarrheas in the underdeveloped countries.
    The antibodies are produced by the cells (plasma cells) localized in the gut and the lung. These cells are migrating to the lactating breast-tissue for hormonal trigger (enteromammal plasma cell circle) and they continue producing these antibodies in the breast. These antibodies appear in the breast milk. In brief, the breast milk may contain all the antibodies the mother has in her digestive and respiratory systems. The function of these antibodies is to block the entrance of antigens infectious agents, toxins, allergens etc) across the digestive or respiratory tract of babies.
    In case of celiac disease, it means that if the mother has circulating antibodies to gliadin, these antibodies appear in the milk. If the breast fed baby ingests gliadin (or the mother ingests accidentally and traces of gliadin appear in the milk) the antibodies in the milk blocks the gliadin and it will not able to cross the intestinal wall and meet with the babys immunosystem. Theoretically, the breast-fed infant do not have any immunoreaction to gliadin. If the mother accidentally ingests gliadin during breast feeding it is likely that the concentration of antigliadin antibodies become higher in the breast milk.
    To answer the question: the antibodies in breast milk are protective and do not "trigger" celiac disease in genetically predisposed babies. There are several data showing that breast-feeding has a protective effect in case of celiac disease. Furthermore, it is well documented that breast-feeding in the first year of life decreases the risk of allergies by 50% in babies whose parents have allergies.
    As far as the reaction after weaning concerned: it is also known that babies may have some reaction (loose stool or spit up or discomfort) transiently after introducing a new food, however, this is a temporary symptom and not allergy or immunoreaction to the food. It is likely that their digestive system should accommodate to the new foods.

    Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.
    The following is a post from Ron Hoggan - Q: I asked the doctor what an inflamed mucosa could mean and he shrugged and then added parasites, maybe? She was tested for parasites way back before her first biopsy (October 96).
    A: Have you tried eliminating dairy? Volta et. al. have demonstrated that 36% to 48% of celiacs tested were also intolerant to milk protein. Borner et. al. have demonstrated sequence homology, from the N-terminal, between casein and gliadin. The other three cited below are also identifying milk protein intolerances associated with celiac disease.
    Playing the odds, exclusion of dairy is most likely to help. But there are other significant dietary allergens that might be eliminated if a dairy free diet, in addition to the Gluten-free diet, doesnt help.
    Borner H, Isolation of antigens recognized by coeliac disease auto-antibodies and their use in enzyme immunoassay of endomysium and reticulin antibody-positive human sera. Clin Exp Immunol 106(2), 344-350 (1996)
    Hvatum M, Serum IgG subclass antibodies to a variety of food antigens in patients with coeliac disease. Gut 33(5), 632-638 (1992)
    Ciclitira PJ, Gliadin antibody production by small intestinal lymphocytes from patients with coeliac disease.Int Arch Allergy Appl Immunol 89(2-3), 246-249 (1989)
    Volta U, Antibodies to dietary antigens in coeliac disease. Scand J Gastroenterol 21(8), 935-940 (1986)
    Ciclitira PJ, Secretion of gliadin antibody by coeliac jejunal mucosal biopsies cultured in vitro. Clin Exp Immunol 64(1), 119-124 (1986)

    admin

    By Jessica Mahood , M.S. Bacteriology
    Celiac.com 09/28/2004 - A very good question: what is gliadin and why does it survive a bath in hot oil? I am a little hesitant to answer because I am not a protein chemist who specializes in such things. However, I was a bacteriologist with many years of exposure to biochemical concepts, so Im probably better equipped than most to give this a go.
    First of all, a protein primer: As someone mentioned, proteins are made up of building blocks. We generally call these amino acids. Sometimes amino acids are represented in the scientific literature as a single letter--you will see something like PQQLL (pay attention to this because it will come up again later). Each of those letters stands for an amino acid that is linked to the next. So, imagine the amino acids to be beads in a necklace. This configuration--the beads of amino acids connected in the necklace--is called the primary structure.
    Now, imagine this necklace to be twisted around itself in some fashion. This is generally known as the secondary structure of the protein and often looks like a helix. Next, take that twisted necklace and bend it around into a 3-D blob. This is known as the tertiary structure. If you were to take several different necklaces compressed into this tertiary structure and combine them, you would have a quaternary structure.
    So, there are four basic levels of protein structure, primary through quaternary. Of course, the actual chemistry is a bit more complicated, because many amino acids have a chemical charge to them that can influence how they respond to their neighbors, or to the outside environment. Think of a magnet--like repels like, attracts opposite. If they are attracted or repelled, its going to effect the ultimate structure of that protein. Amino acids, as molecules, are also different sizes. One amino acid may be like a small bead that fits easily between the others, while the next amino acid could be huge and practically hanging off of the necklace. Imagine this as a lump in our necklace that prohibits it from fitting neatly against another necklace in our blob.
    There is also the fact that not all proteins have all four of the levels of structure. Some proteins simply exist as a secondary structure or tertiary structure. So, there are many different types of protein structures in nature. Often times, these depend on the job of the protein.
    Hopefully I havent thoroughly confused you by now. Suffice it to say that there are many factors involved in determining the properties of a certain protein. So much so that there are actually a set series of tests that scientists use to classify proteins. It is a very complex discipline.
    Now, back to your original question. Proteins cannot be killed, per se, as they are not alive. HOWEVER, they can be damaged or destroyed. This is a process that is called denaturation. Denaturation can be irreversible, such as when you burn something to a crisp. Its as if you melted the strand of that necklace and all of the shapes that it made were lost. Denaturation can also be somewhat temporary. You denature your hair, to some extent, when you use a curling iron. You are slightly unraveling a higher structure of the hair protein, but it can be righted over time (unless the curling iron is too hot!).
    The ease with which a protein denatures depends on many things. Think back to our necklace. If we have, say, five necklaces clustered together to form a single protein, it would probably take a lot of chemical disruption to fully destroy that protein. However, if we had one tiny necklace twisted up slightly, it would be a lot less work to break it apart. There are many other factors involved in this--the size and charge of the beads, for example.
    Gliadin is a fragment of the protein gluten. Gliadin is NOT a single amino acid. Gliadin is simply a subset of a larger protein. Think of it as one necklace within a jumble of many. According to a Stanford research website (http://www.friedli.com/research/PhD/Predict/discuss.html), gluten has the basic structure of:
    MKTFLILALLAIVATTATTAVRVPVPQLQPQNPSQQQPQ
    EQVPLVQQQQFLGQQQPFPPQQPYPQPQPFPSQQPYLQLQ
    PFLQPQLPYSQPQPFRPQQPYPQPQPQYSQPQQPISQQQQ
    QQQQQQQQQQQQQQQIIQQILQQQLIPCMDVVLQQHNIV
    HGKSQVLQQSTYQLLQELCCQHLWQIPEQSQCQAIHNVVH
    AIILHQQQKQQQQPSSQVSFQQPLQQYPLGQGSFRPSQQ
    NPQAQGSVQPQQLPQFEEIRNLARK
    What do these letters mean? Again, they are amino acids. Each one of those letters stands for an amino acid. Its like a code. If the same letter is used, the same amino acid is in those two parts. Within that larger sequence, you see:
    RPQQPYPQPQPQ
    This smaller list of letters is the amino acid code for gliadin. So just for a start, in denaturing our gliadin, we have to destroy all of the rest of the gluten protein that is around it. The next issue is that this sequence contains the letter Q several times. This letter Q represents the amino acid glutamine. This is probably what the person meant when they said that gliadin was an amino acid. They were most likely thinking of glutamine. In any case, as far as amino acids go, glutamine is fairly large and pretty hearty.
    At this point in time, go to the following website: http://www.chemie.fu-berlin.de/chemistry/bio/aminoacid/glutamin_en.html
    Look at the picture of glutamine next to the name at the top--it looks like a couple of groups of letters connected by black lines. If you look to the far left, you see the letters H2N. A certain chemical process in the body changes that H2N into a different chemical group. This is called deamidation, and you hear about it a lot in reference to the Celiac response. It is the deamidated protein within the gliadin fragment of the gluten protein that is believed to be the big trigger for the antibody response that causes damage. What a mouthful, eh?
    Back to gliadin and hot oil, the original question. Okay, so now we know that proteins are pretty complicated. They can have big structures and lots of chemical interactions. Gluten is such a protein. The gliadin fragment of the gluten protein is tough to get to. You must also destroy the properties of the amino acids in the gliadin fragment to truly nullify the immune-irritating properties of gliadin to Celiacs.
    So, for various chemical reasons, gliadin is not easy to denature. According to that Stanford website (http://www.friedli.com/research/PhD/chapter8.html), gliadin is tough stuff. Many changes made to the protein are reversible.
    Researchers are still exploring the properties of gliadin and trying to find a way to use the molecules interactions to stop the Celiac response. It gives me a hope. For now, we have to resign ourselves to being suspicious of those soupy vats of oil in the back of bars and restaurants.


    Yvonne (Vonnie) Mostat
    Celiac.com 03/01/2016 - Did you know that even products all scientists agree to be safe may not be because when researchers experiment in a contained laboratory, they find the product to be safe...and we believe them don't we? The reality is, several of those products, like quinoa and buckwheat can often be cross-contaminated because they are processed and packaged in plants that also process regular wheat. If you visit one of these facilities and see the flour dust everywhere you will notice workers in white coats and masks to prevent dust inhalation. The employees look like they are walking around in astronaut suits, and it becomes clear that anything else processed in that plant could be contaminated with wheat.
    Whenever you have the choice to pick foods that come from facilities that are 100% dedicated gluten-free you should take it. Some foods, like Pamela's and Bob's Red Mill actually test their products twice for gluten. King Arthur Gluten Free Flour say that they test and re-test their entire line of gluten-free products, and have an on-line chat with the baker's hot line: 855-371-2253. Namaste Foods also have their gluten-free foods made in a dedicated facility that is free of gluten, wheat, soy, corn, potato, peanuts, tree nuts, dairy and casein. 1-2-3 Gluten-Free Products state "Made in a dedicated allergen-free facility (NO gluten, wheat, dairy, casein, peanuts, tree nuts, eggs and soy)." Don't just check whether an item is gluten or wheat-free, check whether it is made in a dedicated facility.
    It makes sense that companies that manufacture their products in a dedicated facility may price their products a little higher, and the cost will likely be passed on to the consumer. Pro-Cert indicates that while the expense to produce products under these dedicated protocols offers little versatility from year to year, because it is a closed loop system, but consumers shouldn't expect huge spikes in the price that never come down and only go up. I dream of the day when all gluten-free products will be made in dedicated facilities!
    Dedicated Facilities that Produce Gluten-free Oats
    Montana Mills
    Gluten-free purity protocol confirmed July 17, 2015. Oats are planted only on fields that have grown gluten-free grains for four years. Pure gluten-free seeds are planted. Fields are hand-rogued (You do know what roguing is don't you? Another grain flies in on the wind, or is trampled under foot from another field. Fairly easy to spot in the field of ripened wheat the farmers in my husband's family tell me.) to eliminate possible contamination. The grower is responsible for roguing, but is inspected by a Montana Mills inspector prior to harvest to ensure roguing was thorough and the fields are clean. Oats are transported in certified clean dedicated equipment to a dedicated facility. Redundant Elisa R5 testing is conducted before and after processing. Since 2012 Montana Mills uses the Elisa G12 approved testing.
    Avenin Foods
    Current gluten-free purity protocol confirmed July 21, 2015. They use only pedigree seeds. Growers attend workshops to learn requirements for gluten-free oats. Fields used to grow gluten-free are required to follow a specified crop rotation protocol. The fields are surrounded by isolated strips. All machinery and equipment is either cleaned or dedicated. All oats are processed in a dedicated gluten-free facility. Oats are tested using R5 Elisa 5 methadology.
    Ice Cream Slip Up
    I became very ill two weeks ago upon purchasing a soft ice cream, in a bowl of course, from a new store near our home. I should have realized that Wadden System Frozen Treats (www.icecreamflavors.com) coming from one machine but making over 20 flavors of ice cream, came from a flavor syrup that was added to the plain vanilla in the machine and that is how they got the flavored colors of ice cream. It contained wheat, and being a bit of a pig over ice cream I ordered a medium.
    The nausea came first, then the diarrhea. Within twenty-four hours my scalp was covered in dermatitis herpetiformis lesions, water filled blisters that beg to be itched, and when you comply the burning in your scalp and thighs makes you so miserable you wished you had never even thought of ice cream! I went back of course, and I e-mailed the Wadden Company and suggested they notify the franchise people of what the bottles of flavorings contain. This did not help my illness or itching though, but we learn, oh goodness I hope I learn!
    If a food allergen isn't labeled with all the proper food allergens and makes its
    way into the store shelves, the food may be subject to a recall according to FALCPA (Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004) requirements, and you can report such foods. "Get the Facts", the USDA, U.S. Department of Agriculture, list the new allergen labeling laws that include the top eight food allergens.
    Double Check these Foods
    Imitation Sea Foods, such as imitation crab meat, imitation bacon bits, licorice, flavored coffees and teas, processed foods, some chocolates and bars, salad dressings, hot dogs, sausages, deli-meats, sauces, marinades, seasonings, and soy sauce.
    Medications
    Do what I did, take the form provided by the National Celiac Association for Pharmacists to your pharmacy and tell them you are either a celiac or gluten sensitive and ask them to find out if your medications contain gluten.
    Gluten-Free Oats
    The Gluten Free Watchdog supports the use of gluten-free oats by the celiac disease community that are produced under a purity protocol. At this time we do not support the use of regular oats that are cleaned at the "end" of production via mechanical and/or optical sorting to be "gluten free". Before we can support the use of oats "cleaned" in this manner to be gluten-free we must be provided with thorough testing data. We can then compare this data to the thorough testing data provided to us for oats grown under a purity protocol."
    The Gluten Free Watchdog, who work very hard to keep pushing companies with regards to the safety of oats, had a meeting with General Mills in July to discuss gluten-free Cheerios. Those involved with testing of the oats in Cheerios—Medallion Labs were also present. Marshall Gluten Free Milling and Pro-Cert, (Michael Marshall, President and CEO of Marshall Gluten Free Milling (www.glutenfreemilling.com) sent the Gluten Free Watchdog a letter indicating that they knew it was time to make a difference in a segment of the marketplace that needs some help. What does Marshall Gluten Free Milling do? They are the world's first company that provides ingredients to manufacturers that are produced on third party Certified Gluten Free FARMS by Pro-Cert a worldwide leader in third party organic certification.
    It is a program that closely mirrors organic certification. Each farm must be free from gluten-containing products for two full years and on the third year of production the crops can be marketed. No gluten-containing product can be stored, handled, transported or conveyed with any infrastructure or equipment on the farm. Marshall gluten-free Milling Staff then control the dedicated trucking to a gluten-free only certified cleaning facility where the product is cleaned and sized to maximize quality. The oats are then shipped in a dedicated gluten-free truck to a third party certified gluten-free mill (GFCO, Pro-Cert, etc.). So the mill, cleaner and farm are all certified. The crops available right now on this program are organic oats and flax. Interest has spread to non-organic producers as well. They are expanding their offerings to lentils, peas and possibly quinoa. They need a sustainable crop rotation for the producers in the program. Primarily right now the focus of their ingredient marketing is oats as this is where the 3rd party certification of the farm is most crucial to developing a sustainable gluten-free crop rotation.
    Michael Marshall was asked about General Mills announcing that five varieties of Cheerios were to be labeled gluten-free. The company is using regular oats cleaned at the "end" of production via mechanical separation. According to General Mills there are not enough oats grown under a purity protocol to produce Cheerios. He was asked, based on his industry experience, did he feel that mechanical/optical sorting was sufficient to ensure the gluten-free status of oats. He stated that General Mills was a trusted brand who value their name, and have done their homework on the process. But he also stated that mechanical and optical sorting equipment has been used for quality control for years as well as for food safety precautions. It is not new idea, has come a long way, but he thinks that even General Mills would have to agree it does not reduce the risk to zero. Michael Marshall is concerned about the dust control system used by General Mills. In his opinion, contaminated conventional low cost oats in gluten-free foods is risky.
    After Tricia Thompson of the Gluten Free Watchdog asked if his program guaranteed 100% pure gluten-free oats? He said, "Generally speaking, there are always going to be anomalies." However if you look at the protocols in our program there are standard operating procedures in place. These procedures include: Planting seeds that are verified pure. Using only gluten-free planting equipment. Using buffer strips around the field – At harvest, the crop within the buffer strip cannot be binned with the gluten-free product—this protects the gluten-free crop from outside contamination. Strip testing every load that comes off the field before it is binned. Sending a representing sample from every bin to the lab for testing using the R5ELISA R7001 assay (testing prior to the crop being shipped to the mill. Testing at the mill before the crop is unloaded. The bottom line being they are testing at various steps to find gluten through the entire production of the crop to mitigate or eliminate the risk of contamination before it even gets to the mill. Once at the mill hi-tech sorting or mechanical separation will be for quality versus the only fail-safe measure to assure removal of gluten. The farm will be required to be certified gluten-free by Pro-Cert. They have 25,000 acres of both organic and conventional farmland under the certification program that will be available for the market this October. There are farmers lining up to get on the program and they have not even marketed it yet. It is a big market to supply and I believe we can all benefit.
    Of course they want to follow safety guidelines! The celiac population is big business and I thank the Gluten Free Watchdog for working to develop a safety protocol for oats and working hard to obtain purity so that we can safely eat food without getting sick. But I know there will be a price to be paid for purity and safety, and it has to be passed on to the consumer, and I think there should be more tax breaks for the celiac population. AND, that is another place that the Gluten Free Watchdog and FALCPA (Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004) can help us with keeping the costs down. No-one should have to be penalized out of their pocketbook for having a gluten sensitivity or severe gluten allergy.
    My goodness, in Great Britain tax breaks are considerable for anyone who has diabetes, celiac disease or many notable food allergies. They do not decide that you have to use a certain medication, a generic brand, because the brand prescribed by your doctor is not listed under Pharmacare like they do in British Columbia, and, in Great Britain, as soon as a woman becomes pregnant she receives free vitamins for her unborn baby and all costs during her pregnancy are covered by their Medical Insurance Coverage. Dental, glasses, and money for diapers and a clothing allowance for the first three months of the babies life are paid for. We in the United States and Canada are so far behind Europe and the Great Britain in our health coverage. I think as a celiac and somone who has multiple allergies that require severe diets, some assistance and tax adjustments should be available more than the paltry difficult to monitor cost adjustment program that is in place today in our two countries! I know, my "Bandwagon", but one you should get on board too, and so should the NFCA.

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/20/2018 - A digital media company and a label data company are teaming up to help major manufacturers target, reach and convert their desired shoppers based on dietary needs, such as gluten-free diet. The deal could bring synergy in emerging markets such as the gluten-free and allergen-free markets, which represent major growth sectors in the global food industry. 
    Under the deal, personalized digital media company Catalina will be joining forces with Label Insight. Catalina uses consumer purchases data to target shoppers on a personal base, while Label Insight works with major companies like Kellogg, Betty Crocker, and Pepsi to provide insight on food label data to government, retailers, manufacturers and app developers.
    "Brands with very specific product benefits, gluten-free for example, require precise targeting to efficiently reach and convert their desired shoppers,” says Todd Morris, President of Catalina's Go-to-Market organization, adding that “Catalina offers the only purchase-based targeting solution with this capability.” 
    Label Insight’s clients include food and beverage giants such as Unilever, Ben & Jerry's, Lipton and Hellman’s. Label Insight technology has helped the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) build the sector’s very first scientifically accurate database of food ingredients, health attributes and claims.
    Morris says the joint partnership will allow Catalina to “enhance our dataset and further increase our ability to target shoppers who are currently buying - or have shown intent to buy - in these emerging categories,” including gluten-free, allergen-free, and other free-from foods.
    The deal will likely make for easier, more precise targeting of goods to consumers, and thus provide benefits for manufacturers and retailers looking to better serve their retail food customers, especially in specialty areas like gluten-free and allergen-free foods.
    Source:
    fdfworld.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/19/2018 - Previous genome and linkage studies indicate the existence of a new disease triggering mechanism that involves amino acid metabolism and nutrient sensing signaling pathways. In an effort to determine if amino acids might play a role in the development of celiac disease, a team of researchers recently set out to investigate if plasma amino acid levels differed among children with celiac disease compared with a control group.
     
    The research team included Åsa Torinsson Naluai, Ladan Saadat Vafa, Audur H. Gudjonsdottir, Henrik Arnell, Lars Browaldh, and Daniel Agardh. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Karolinska University Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institute, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Diabetes & Celiac Disease Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; and with the Nathan S Kline Institute in the U.S.A.
    First, the team used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to analyze amino acid levels in fasting plasma samples from 141 children with celiac disease and 129 non-celiac disease controls. They then crafted a general linear model using age and experimental effects as covariates to compare amino acid levels between children with celiac disease and non-celiac control subjects.
    Compared with the control group, seven out of twenty-three children with celiac disease showed elevated levels of the the following amino acids: tryptophan; taurine; glutamic acid; proline; ornithine; alanine; and methionine.
    The significance of the individual amino acids do not survive multiple correction, however, multivariate analyses of the amino acid profile showed significantly altered amino acid levels in children with celiac disease overall and after correction for age, sex and experimental effects.
    This study shows that amino acids can influence inflammation and may play a role in the development of celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/18/2018 - To the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service animals.
    If you’ve flown anywhere lately, you may have seen them. People flying with their designated “emotional support” animals. We’re not talking genuine service animals, like seeing eye dogs, or hearing ear dogs, or even the Belgian Malinois that alerts its owner when there is gluten in food that may trigger her celiac disease.
    Now, to be honest, some of those animals in question do perform a genuine service for those who need emotional support dogs, like veterans with PTSD.
    However, many of these animals are not service animals at all. Many of these animals perform no actual service to their owners, and are nothing more than thinly disguised pets. Many lack proper training, and some have caused serious problems for the airlines and for other passengers.
    Now the major airlines are taking note and introducing stringent requirements for service animals.
    Delta was the first to strike. As reported by the New York Times on January 19: “Effective March 1, Delta, the second largest US airline by passenger traffic, said it will require passengers seeking to fly with pets to present additional documents outlining the passenger’s need for the animal and proof of its training and vaccinations, 48 hours prior to the flight.… This comes in response to what the carrier said was a 150 percent increase in service and support animals — pets, often dogs, that accompany people with disabilities — carried onboard since 2015.… Delta said that it flies some 700 service animals a day. Among them, customers have attempted to fly with comfort turkeys, gliding possums, snakes, spiders, and other unusual pets.”
    Fresh from an unsavory incident with an “emotional support” peacock incident, United Airlines has followed Delta’s lead and set stricter rules for emotional support animals. United’s rules also took effect March 1, 2018.
    So, to the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service and emotional support animals.
    Source:
    cnbc.com

    admin
    WHAT IS CELIAC DISEASE?
    Celiac disease is an autoimmune condition that affects around 1% of the population. People with celiac disease suffer an autoimmune reaction when they consume wheat, rye or barley. The immune reaction is triggered by certain proteins in the wheat, rye, or barley, and, left untreated, causes damage to the small, finger-like structures, called villi, that line the gut. The damage occurs as shortening and villous flattening in the lamina propria and crypt regions of the intestines. The damage to these villi then leads to numerous other issues that commonly plague people with untreated celiac disease, including poor nutritional uptake, fatigue, and myriad other problems.
    Celiac disease mostly affects people of Northern European descent, but recent studies show that it also affects large numbers of people in Italy, China, Iran, India, and numerous other places thought to have few or no cases.
    Celiac disease is most often uncovered because people experience symptoms that lead them to get tests for antibodies to gluten. If these tests are positive, then the people usually get biopsy confirmation of their celiac disease. Once they adopt a gluten-free diet, they usually see gut healing, and major improvements in their symptoms. 
    CLASSIC CELIAC DISEASE SYMPTOMS
    Symptoms of celiac disease can range from the classic features, such as diarrhea, upset stomach, bloating, gas, weight loss, and malnutrition, among others.
    LESS OBVIOUS SYMPTOMS
    Celiac disease can often less obvious symptoms, such fatigue, vitamin and nutrient deficiencies, anemia, to name a few. Often, these symptoms are regarded as less obvious because they are not gastrointestinal in nature. You got that right, it is not uncommon for people with celiac disease to have few or no gastrointestinal symptoms. That makes spotting and connecting these seemingly unrelated and unclear celiac symptoms so important.
    NO SYMPTOMS
    Currently, most people diagnosed with celiac disease do not show symptoms, but are diagnosed on the basis of referral for elevated risk factors. 

    CELIAC DISEASE VS. GLUTEN INTOLERANCE
    Gluten intolerance is a generic term for people who have some sort of sensitivity to gluten. These people may or may not have celiac disease. Researchers generally agree that there is a condition called non-celiac gluten sensitivity. That term has largely replaced the term gluten-intolerance. What’s the difference between celiac disease and non-celiac gluten-sensitivity? 
    CELIAC DISEASE VS. NON-CELIAC GLUTEN SENSITIVITY (NCGS)
    Gluten triggers symptoms and immune reactions in people with celiac disease. Gluten can also trigger symptoms in some people with NCGS, but the similarities largely end there.

    There are four main differences between celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity:
    No Hereditary Link in NCGS
    Researchers know for certain that genetic heredity plays a major role in celiac disease. If a first-degree relative has celiac disease, then you have a statistically higher risk of carrying genetic markers DQ2 and/or DQ8, and of developing celiac disease yourself. NCGS is not known to be hereditary. Some research has shown certain genetic associations, such as some NCGS patients, but there is no proof that NCGS is hereditary. No Connection with Celiac-related Disorders
    Unlike celiac disease, NCGS is so far not associated with malabsorption, nutritional deficiencies, or a higher risk of autoimmune disorders or intestinal malignancies. No Immunological or Serological Markers
    People with celiac disease nearly always test positive for antibodies to gluten proteins. Researchers have, as yet, identified no such antobodies or serologic markers for NCGS. That means that, unlike with celiac disease, there are no telltale screening tests that can point to NCGS. Absence of Celiac Disease or Wheat Allergy
    Doctors diagnose NCGS only by excluding both celiac disease, an IgE-mediated allergy to wheat, and by the noting ongoing adverse symptoms associated with gluten consumption. WHAT ABOUT IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME (IBS) AND IRRITABLE BOWEL DISEASE (IBD)?
    IBS and IBD are usually diagnosed in part by ruling out celiac disease. Many patients with irritable bowel syndrome are sensitive to gluten. Many experience celiac disease-like symptoms in reaction to wheat. However, patients with IBS generally show no gut damage, and do not test positive for antibodies to gliadin and other proteins as do people with celiac disease. Some IBS patients also suffer from NCGS.

    To add more confusion, many cases of IBS are, in fact, celiac disease in disguise.

    That said, people with IBS generally react to more than just wheat. People with NCGS generally react to wheat and not to other things, but that’s not always the case. Doctors generally try to rule out celiac disease before making a diagnosis of IBS or NCGS. 
    Crohn’s Disease and celiac disease share many common symptoms, though causes are different.  In Crohn’s disease, the immune system can cause disruption anywhere along the gastrointestinal tract, and a diagnosis of Crohn’s disease typically requires more diagnostic testing than does a celiac diagnosis.  
    Crohn’s treatment consists of changes to diet and possible surgery.  Up to 10% of Crohn's patients can have both of conditions, which suggests a genetic connection, and researchers continue to examine that connection.
    Is There a Connection Between Celiac Disease, Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity and Irritable Bowel Syndrome? Large Number of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Patients Sensitive To Gluten Some IBD Patients also Suffer from Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity Many Cases of IBS and Fibromyalgia Actually Celiac Disease in Disguise CELIAC DISEASE DIAGNOSIS
    Diagnosis of celiac disease can be difficult. 

    Perhaps because celiac disease presents clinically in such a variety of ways, proper diagnosis often takes years. A positive serological test for antibodies against tissue transglutaminase is considered a very strong diagnostic indicator, and a duodenal biopsy revealing villous atrophy is still considered by many to be the diagnostic gold standard. 
    But this idea is being questioned; some think the biopsy is unnecessary in the face of clear serological tests and obvious symptoms. Also, researchers are developing accurate and reliable ways to test for celiac disease even when patients are already avoiding wheat. In the past, patients needed to be consuming wheat to get an accurate test result. 
    Celiac disease can have numerous vague, or confusing symptoms that can make diagnosis difficult.  Celiac disease is commonly misdiagnosed by doctors. Read a Personal Story About Celiac Disease Diagnosis from the Founder of Celiac.com Currently, testing and biopsy still form the cornerstone of celiac diagnosis.
    TESTING
    There are several serologic (blood) tests available that screen for celiac disease antibodies, but the most commonly used is called a tTG-IgA test. If blood test results suggest celiac disease, your physician will recommend a biopsy of your small intestine to confirm the diagnosis.
    Testing is fairly simple and involves screening the patients blood for antigliadin (AGA) and endomysium antibodies (EmA), and/or doing a biopsy on the areas of the intestines mentioned above, which is still the standard for a formal diagnosis. Also, it is now possible to test people for celiac disease without making them concume wheat products.

    BIOPSY
    Until recently, biopsy confirmation of a positive gluten antibody test was the gold standard for celiac diagnosis. It still is, but things are changing fairly quickly. Children can now be accurately diagnosed for celiac disease without biopsy. Diagnosis based on level of TGA-IgA 10-fold or more the ULN, a positive result from the EMA tests in a second blood sample, and the presence of at least 1 symptom could avoid risks and costs of endoscopy for more than half the children with celiac disease worldwide.

    WHY A GLUTEN-FREE DIET?
    Currently the only effective, medically approved treatment for celiac disease is a strict gluten-free diet. Following a gluten-free diet relieves symptoms, promotes gut healing, and prevents nearly all celiac-related complications. 
    A gluten-free diet means avoiding all products that contain wheat, rye and barley, or any of their derivatives. This is a difficult task as there are many hidden sources of gluten found in the ingredients of many processed foods. Still, with effort, most people with celiac disease manage to make the transition. The vast majority of celiac disease patients who follow a gluten-free diet see symptom relief and experience gut healing within two years.
    For these reasons, a gluten-free diet remains the only effective, medically proven treatment for celiac disease.
    WHAT ABOUT ENZYMES, VACCINES, ETC.?
    There is currently no enzyme or vaccine that can replace a gluten-free diet for people with celiac disease.
    There are enzyme supplements currently available, such as AN-PEP, Latiglutetenase, GluteGuard, and KumaMax, which may help to mitigate accidental gluten ingestion by celiacs. KumaMax, has been shown to survive the stomach, and to break down gluten in the small intestine. Latiglutenase, formerly known as ALV003, is an enzyme therapy designed to be taken with meals. GluteGuard has been shown to significantly protect celiac patients from the serious symptoms they would normally experience after gluten ingestion. There are other enzymes, including those based on papaya enzymes.

    Additionally, there are many celiac disease drugs, enzymes, and therapies in various stages of development by pharmaceutical companies, including at least one vaccine that has received financial backing. At some point in the not too distant future there will likely be new treatments available for those who seek an alternative to a lifelong gluten-free diet. 

    For now though, there are no products on the market that can take the place of a gluten-free diet. Any enzyme or other treatment for celiac disease is intended to be used in conjunction with a gluten-free diet, not as a replacement.

    ASSOCIATED DISEASES
    The most common disorders associated with celiac disease are thyroid disease and Type 1 Diabetes, however, celiac disease is associated with many other conditions, including but not limited to the following autoimmune conditions:
    Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: 2.4-16.4% Multiple Sclerosis (MS): 11% Hashimoto’s thyroiditis: 4-6% Autoimmune hepatitis: 6-15% Addison disease: 6% Arthritis: 1.5-7.5% Sjögren’s syndrome: 2-15% Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy: 5.7% IgA Nephropathy (Berger’s Disease): 3.6% Other celiac co-morditities include:
    Crohn’s Disease; Inflammatory Bowel Disease Chronic Pancreatitis Down Syndrome Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Lupus Multiple Sclerosis Primary Biliary Cirrhosis Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Psoriasis Rheumatoid Arthritis Scleroderma Turner Syndrome Ulcerative Colitis; Inflammatory Bowel Disease Williams Syndrome Cancers:
    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (intestinal and extra-intestinal, T- and B-cell types) Small intestinal adenocarcinoma Esophageal carcinoma Papillary thyroid cancer Melanoma CELIAC DISEASE REFERENCES:
    Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University
    Gluten Intolerance Group
    National Institutes of Health
    U.S. National Library of Medicine
    Mayo Clinic
    University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/17/2018 - Could the holy grail of gluten-free food lie in special strains of wheat that lack “bad glutens” that trigger the celiac disease, but include the “good glutens” that make bread and other products chewy, spongey and delicious? Such products would include all of the good things about wheat, but none of the bad things that might trigger celiac disease.
    A team of researchers in Spain is creating strains of wheat that lack the “bad glutens” that trigger the autoimmune disorder celiac disease. The team, based at the Institute for Sustainable Agriculture in Cordoba, Spain, is making use of the new and highly effective CRISPR gene editing to eliminate the majority of the gliadins in wheat.
    Gliadins are the gluten proteins that trigger the majority of symptoms for people with celiac disease.
    As part of their efforts, the team has conducted a small study on 20 people with “gluten sensitivity.” That study showed that test subjects can tolerate bread made with this special wheat, says team member Francisco Barro. However, the team has yet to publish the results.
    Clearly, more comprehensive testing would be needed to determine if such a product is safely tolerated by people with celiac disease. Still, with these efforts, along with efforts to develop vaccines, enzymes, and other treatments making steady progress, we are living in exciting times for people with celiac disease.
    It is entirely conceivable that in the not-so-distant future we will see safe, viable treatments for celiac disease that do not require a strict gluten-free diet.
    Read more at Digitaltrends.com , and at Newscientist.com