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    Low Glycemic Paleo Diet (Part 2)


    Tina Turbin


    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2015 Issue - Originally published April 8, 2015


    Image Caption: Photo: CC--thebittenword.com

    Celiac.com 12/29/2015 - I discussed the possibility of a Low Glycemic Paleo Diet as an entertaining idea as a beneficial diet for celiac in the last issue, Winter 2015. In closing, I stated I would reveal more about this topic in the coming issue. So, let's dive in and open our eyes to some facts and even some revealing possibilities that may very well help improve our health and quality of life.


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    As a celiac myself, (2 of my three kids have celiac disease and my grandfather died from undiagnosed celiac disease) I was more than happy to follow the gluten-free diet diligently once finally diagnosed after many years of distress, bone loss, declining health not to mention non-stop bone aches, bowel inconsistency and severe lack of muscle tone. I will spare you further details but there was no doubt a major beneficial change that occurred once I eliminated all gluten from sources of wheat, rye and barley and all its "relatives" or any possible cross contamination. Eventually I was thrilled to be able to eat baked good substitutes that did not hurt my belly, cause my joints and bones to ache and were absolutely delicious and healthy, as they were gluten-free!

    Soon after I became an active advocate (and for many years) I was thrilled to be able to speak broadly to help raise awareness about celiac disease and the NEED for the gluten-free diet. I was also soon working closely with many gluten-free companies (as a tester, consultant and promoter) becoming blind to the fact that the boxes that were arriving to my door by the truckload were all desserts, loaded with carbohydrates and sugars.

    At the time I wrote and spoke often (in interviews and on radio) about Type 2 diabetes and celiac disease but never put two and two together. If lifestyle and diet change can address Type 2 permanently, what were these diet changes that were so effective? Also, even more to the point, why was Type 2 diabetes so common as a diagnosis after being diagnosed with celiac disease and going on the gluten-free diet?

    Research suggests an association between Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease, but there does not appear to be a link between celiac disease and type 2 diabetes. Type 2 is not an autoimmune disorder and doesn't share genes with celiac disease. According to the Celiac Sprue Association, individuals can be genetically predisposed to Type 2 diabetes, but those genes don't increase the risk of celiac disease.

    Let's look at the immense increased ingestion of glucose, sugars and carbohydrates and fiber while one is on the gluten-free diet by indulging in baked goods, desserts and grains! Gluten-free foods and grains are typically made with rice starch (or brown rice starch), tapioca starch, cornstarch and potato starch. All of which have virtually no fiber. Hence straight into the blood stream spiking the blood sugar bite after bite and quickly.

    The latest attempt is many companies and cooks trying to improve nutrients by baking with higher fiber gluten-free grains with higher nutrient value. Such as teff, millet, buckwheat etc. These are all still VERY HIGH in carbohydrates and very little fiber to slow the glycemic entrance into the blood system, still resulting in spiking the blood sugar rapidly. I must mention that most people do not just eat 2-3 bites of millet or a ¼ cup of cooked buckwheat. This would be easier on the body, but it seldom occurs.

    Carbohydrates are a type of nutrient in foods and some feel we need this to survive physically and some MD's are saying we need far less than we ever thought. The three basic forms are sugars, starches and fiber. Different types of carbohydrates have properties that affect how quickly your body digests them and how quickly glucose enters your bloodstream. When we eat or drink anything with carbs, the body breaks down the sugars and starches into a type of sugar called glucose. Glucose is the main source of energy for cells in the body. Fiber passes through your body undigested. The unused glucose for energy is quickly taken out of the blood stream by the insulin and "stocked" away in the cells for future energy as fat. It is the body's amazing way of survival.

    To elaborate a bit more, the two main hormones from the pancreas help regulate glucose in the bloodstream. Insulin moves glucose from the blood into the cells. Glucagon helps release glucose stored in your liver when the blood sugar (blood glucose) level is low.

    I suggest to anyone to take a look at the nutritional value on all packages and foods and get familiar with the amount of carbohydrates you are ingesting through your meals, snack and drinks. Get familiar with the carbohydrate, sugar and fiber levels in the food you buy and have in your home. Getting educated is the first step to learning and then you can make changes to suit your health and body goals.

    A healthy paleo or gluten-free diet is a low glycemic one at the very least. A low glycemic diet can improve all manner of current health situations. By statistics and more than abundant research, it will deter diseases quiet commonly associated with a high glycemic diet.

    We will expand on this topic next time.

    At this point I would like to refer you to some highly respected professionals and allow you to do further research and come to your own conclusions. Please look further into DrPerlmutter.com, Mercola.com, WheatBellyBlog.com, BulletProofExec.com, ChrisKresser.com, MarksDailyApple.com.

    As always, wishing you the best in your life and health!


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    Good article. My son has celiac but also has nut, soy, potato, wheat etc allergies. Paleo diets don't work as most call for almonds and various other nuts. Try telling a child he can't eat cookies - gluten free or not. I find it very difficult avoiding the flours you listed ... he wants his birthday cake and after school cookies.

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  • About Me

    Tina Turbin is a world-renowned Celiac advocate who researches, writes, and consults about the benefits of the gluten-free, paleo-ish, low carb and keto diets, and is a full time recipe developer and founder of PaleOmazing.com. Tina also founded and manages the popular website, GlutenFreeHelp.info, voted the #2 .info website in the world. Tina believes that celiacs need to be educated to be able to make informed decisions and that Paleo needs to be tailored to the individual’s physiology to obtain desired results. You can reach her at: INFO@PaleOmazing.com.

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  • Related Articles

    Dr. Rodney Ford M.D.
    Celiac.com 10/22/2008 - This article appeared in the Autumn 2007 edition of Celiac.com's Scott-Free Newsletter.
    The Gluten Syndrome refers to the cluster ofsymptoms that you experience if you react to gluten.  Gluten can affectyour gut, your skin, and your brain.  It applies to any reaction thatis caused by gluten.  It includes celiac disease, along with the myriadsymptoms that can be experienced throughout your gastro-intestinaltract in response to gluten.  It also includes many other symptoms thatdo not stem from your gut.  These include brain and behavior disorders,irritability and tiredness, skin problems, muscular aches and pains andjoint problems.
    The effects of gluten are wide ranging and arenow brought together under the term Gluten Syndrome.  In mostinstances, a simple blood test (the IgG-gliadin antibody test) canidentify those people who are affected.  
    10% Affected by Gluten
    TheGluten Syndrome affects about one in ten people.  However, most peoplewho are affected are unaware that their life is being hindered bygluten.  The gluten symptoms are most likely to be caused by damage tothe nerves and brain.  The earlier the problem is identified, thebetter the response to a gluten-free diet will be.
    Tummy Pains and not Growing
    Jontiis 3 years old.  His gluten story is typical.  His mother brought himto see me because she was concerned about his poor growth, and hisdistressing abdominal pains.  His blood tests showed a high gluten test(His IgG gliadin was 94 units.  This test result is usually less than15 at this age).  Other tests, including the gene test for celiacs,showed that he did not have celiac disease.
    I suggested that hego on a gluten-free diet.  Within days he began to eat better, and histummy pains went.  He is now growing again on a gluten-free diet.  Hismum wrote:
    “I really haven’t found the gluten-free diet thatdifficult.  I found people to be incredibly helpful actually, both inthe supermarket and in restaurants.  In the supermarket there is a lotof normal type food that is gluten-free and it is all clearly labeledthat it is gluten-free.  Even if you go to the delicatessen departmentthey will tell you which luncheon sausage is gluten-free.  There aregluten-free sausages all labeled and it’s normal food that tastes great.
    Forthe baking mixes and bread mixes, you don’t even have to go to thespecialist health food shops.  I go to no other shops other than thesupermarket to get food for him and I haven’t really found it thatdifficult.”
    Amazed how Jonti has Adapted
    Ihave been amazed, actually, by how easily Jonti has adapted to thegluten-free diet.  I tell him it is special food for him and that itwon’t hurt his tummy.  We have got nice biscuits from a bakery and heis allowed to choose which one he wants for morning tea.  He still hasnormal foods like chips and sweets.  He is not missing out and theother biscuits he hasn’t even really asked for.  The only thing is thebread!  I have yet to perfect the making of the bread.  Toast is aboutthe only thing he asked for.  You can get specialist cornflakes andcereals, porridge he loves, again, at the supermarket.  It has beensurprisingly easy actually
    I’m so pleased that he is now well again.  Gluten-free has made such a huge difference.”
    The Main Points:

    The Gluten Syndrome refers to the cluster of symptoms that youexperience if you react to gluten.  It can affect your gut, skin andnerves. Medical practitioners accept that gluten causes celiac disease(gut damage) but often resist the notion that gluten can cause a widerspectrum of illness. Celiac disease, gluten intolerance and gluten sensitivity are all part of The Gluten Syndrome. Rapidly accumulating medical evidence shows that gluten is nowcreating a massive health problem throughout the Western world. However, woefully few people are aware of the catalogue of harm thatgluten is causing.  About one in ten people—that is millions ofpeople—are affected by The Gluten Syndrome. Gluten could be responsible for one-third of all cases of chronicillness and fatigue.  People suffering from these conditions arecurrently just tolerating their symptoms, unaware that gluten is theculprit.  This is because the link to gluten is not yet recognized bythe medical community. Gluten-containing products are being added to our food chain inincreasing amounts.  Our wheat is being engineered to have even highergluten content.  This gluten overload is occurring without ourcommunities being unaware of the harm that this is causing. Gluten can cause malfunctions of the brain and neural networks ofsusceptible people.  The incidence of mental, neurological and braindisorders is on the rise.  However, the diagnosis of gluten-sensitivityis seldom made. The community is already embracing the notion ofgluten-sensitivity.  More and more people are opting for a gluten-freelifestyle.  These people are looking for a term to identify theirillness.  Their search is over.  They have been affected by The GlutenSyndrome. A strong gluten-free movement is developing globally in responseto the knowledge that going gluten-free can be so beneficial to so manypeople.  What has been missing up until now is a name that captures thegluten problem.  The missing name is The Gluten Syndrome.

    Get Your Blood TestsThe Gluten Tests
    Glutenis a protein that is found in wheat grains.  This protein has a numberof components, one of which is called gliadin.  People who get sickfrom gluten are usually reacting to the gliadin component.  
    You are a Long Tube
    Tounderstand what the blood tests mean, first you need to know a littlemore about your immune system.  It is the job of your immune system toprotect you from the outside world.  It protects you from the invasionof microbes (viruses and bacteria), and it also protects you from thetoxins and poisons in the food that passes through your gut.  Your gutis a long tube inside you that travels from your mouth to your anus. This is your gastrointestinal tract, also called your bowel.  Eventhough it is inside your body, the contents of this tube are still onthe ‘outside’ from your body’s point of view.  Lots of your immunecells coat the skin (called the mucosa) of this tube and work hard toprotect you from anything that might prove to be harmful.
    Gluten (Gliadin) can be Toxic
    Gliadin,the toxic component of the gluten protein, is one such harmfulsubstance.  Your immune system defends your body strongly againstgliadin using weapons called antibodies and the gliadin is repelled. The outcome of your immune system’s fight against gliadin is theproduction of antibodies that are specifically targeted towardsgliadin: these are called anti-gliadin antibodies.
    Gliadin Antibodies
    Anti-gliadinAntibodies (commonly called the IgG-gliadin antibody) are weapons thathave been made specifically to fight against gluten in the diet. Remember, gliadin is a component of the gluten protein.  This antibodyis very sensitive.  It is made very specifically by your immune systemto fight against gliadin.  However, a high level of this antibody doesnot necessarily mean that you have any gut damage, so it is not veryaccurate in assisting the identification of patients with celiac gutdamage.  On the other hand, tests for this antibody are nearly alwaysstrongly positive in people with celiac disease who are not on agluten-free diet.  Once people are placed on a strict diet, theseantibodies will fall to normal levels within a period ranging from fewmonths to a year or two.
    Gluten Tests Not Getting Done
    Thereis a problem.  Unfortunately, this gluten blood test (the IgG-gliadinantibody test) is no longer available from most communitylaboratories.  This year many laboratories have decided to discontinuethis test.  Their opinion is that it is worthless (for detecting celiacdisease).
    I disagree with their decision.  My latest data shows thathuge numbers of people remain undiagnosed with serious symptoms becauseof the misinterpretation of this gluten test result.  At the moment itis difficult to get the medical labs to do your gluten test.  They areunwilling to consider that gluten causes a wide spectrum of illnessthat has been written up in the international medical literature.  Theyhave turned a blind eye to the problem.  If you can’t test for glutenreactions, then you will not be able to make the diagnosis!
    A Diagnosis at Last!
    Mandywrote this letter to me: “Hi Dr Rodney Ford, for many, many, years Ihave been to doctors complaining of a bloated tummy, extreme crampingpains, and diarrhea (to the point I had no time to get to the toilet). I have recently had some blood test for celiacs done by my GP.  Myresults showed: the tTG was negative; and the IgG-Gliadin resultstrongly positive.  He could not explain it to me, but he said that Idid not have celiac disease.”
    “I have no idea what these testsmean.  Although I got no answers, I had to try something.  I was at theend of my nerves!  My bad health has always been upsetting my socialand working life.  I often have to rush home to the toilet.”
    Amazing on a Gluten-free Diet
    “SoI decided to try a gluten-free diet!  I have now been gluten-free for amonth.  It is amazing! Already I feel like a different person!  No morebloating, just the odd stomach cramp.  Also, all my headaches havegone.  But I still feel really tired and not sure how to overcomethis.  Can you help me please by explaining my blood test results—andshould I have anymore tests?  What else I can do to help myself?   Ihope you can help me Dr Ford.  Gluten, up to now, seems to have made mylife a misery.  Even though I feel so much better already, I want toget even better.  Kind regards, Mandy.”
    The Gluten Syndrome
    Ireplied: “Thanks.  I am glad that you are feeling a lot better offgluten.  From your story and your blood test results, you havegluten-sensitivity.  You do not have celiac disease (your low tTG levelshows that you do not have any gut damage from gluten).  But you arestill getting sick from gluten (your high IgG-gliadin level shows thatyour body reacts to gluten).  The good news is that it takes manymonths to get the full benefits of a gluten-free diet.  I expect thatyou will continue to feel better over the next few months.  You shouldbe taking some additional iron and a multivitamin supplements becauseyou will be relatively iron deficient—that will be making you tired.”
    The Time has Come
    Thehistory of science and medicine is littered with vehement argumentsagainst any new idea that runs contrary to traditional beliefs. Ironically however, it takes new ideas to make progress.  It was GeorgeBernard Shaw who said that “The reasonable man adapts himself to theworld: the unreasonable one persists in trying to adapt the world tohimself.  Therefore, all progress depends on the unreasonable man.”
    Thousands Convinced
    Manypeople are joining the ranks of the gluten-free.  There are thousandsof people like you who have read this information and who are concernedabout how gluten might be affecting them; there a millions of peoplewho are sick and tired of being ignored and who are looking for moreenergy and vitality; there are the practitioners in the field ofcomplementary medicine who are aware of the concept ofgluten-sensitivity; there are the laboratories who have developed thegliadin antibody test and know that their tests are specific for glutenreactions; there are the gluten-free food manufacturers who haverecognised that there is an ever-increasing demand for gluten-freeproducts; there are the networks of people in the health food industrywho appreciate the value of high-quality food and a gluten-free diet;and there are the supermarkets and grocery stores that are sensitive tothe demands of their customers.
    Who Might Oppose this Trend?
    Aspreviously discussed, medical practitioners are wary of overturningtradition.  They do not want to be seen as alternative and want toavoid acting outside of the recommended clinical guidelines.  Inaddition, there are the grain-growers and the bread-makers who maketheir living from gluten, and the pharmaceutical companies who maketheir living from the sick and unwell.  
    Bad Behavior on Gluten
    Kimberleyis 12 years old.  She has The Gluten Syndrome and her behavior getsdisturbed with gluten.  She does not have celiac disease but she doeshave a high gluten test.  (Her IgG-gliadin level was 55 units—It shouldbe less than 20.)
    Her mum said: “It is interesting about howbehavior troubles are linked to gluten!  Our youngest, Kimberley, isnow 12 years old.  She had her IgG-gliadin measured and it was high. She was clearly a lot better when she was off gluten.  However then shedecided to ‘try’ gluten again.  Rodney suggested a small amount but shewent for it—big time!”
    By the end of a week, two other parentshad asked what was wrong with her.  Another parent asked “what onearth’s the matter with her” she seemed so different and stroppy.  Sheadmitted she felt “absolutely awful” but really didn’t want to admit itas she knew it meant she’d have to completely give up gluten.”
    Anyway,after a lot of talking, she agreed it wasn’t in her best interests toeat gluten.  From that day she has been gluten-free ever since, withthe odd very long envious glance at French bread!  With our supportshe’s very compliant with being gluten-free now, which I think is remarkable forher age.  Clearly she now understands and gets the benefits of gluten-free.  ButI was really shocked at how affected her behavior was after areintroduction of gluten.”
    Could You Have The Gluten Syndrome?
    Onein every ten people is affected by gluten.  If you have chronic symptom(feeling sick, tired and grumpy) then you should get checked for TheGluten Syndrome. 


    Wendy Cohan
    Celiac.com 10/19/2009 - Gluten intolerance in the form of celiac disease (a hereditary autoimmune disorder) or non-celiac gluten sensitivity, may affect virtually any part of the body. In it’s involvement in multiple health disorders, gluten intolerance is a major driver of health care delivery and associated costs.  While this may seem to be an outrageous claim to make, a discussion of the many ways in which gluten intolerance can negatively affect the body can illustrate this point. So, let’s work our way down from the top…
    Normal, healthy hair is usually glossy and thick.  An autoimmune disorder known as alopecia areata results in abnormal loss of hair, either in patches, or total body hair-loss, and is one of many autoimmune disorders associated with celiac disease. Malabsorption severe enough to cause malnutrition can also result in thin, sparse, fragile hair. One of the outward signs of hypothyroidism is thinning hair and a loss of the outer third of the eyebrow; hypothyroidism is strongly associated with celiac disease.
    Now let’s look at the brain.  There are, unfortunately, a large number of neurological disorders associated with gluten intolerance and celiac disease, including narcolepsy, depression, ADD/ADHD, Autism Spectrum Disorders, and schizophrenia. There are also movement and balance disorders associated with gluten intolerance, including ataxia - the inability to coordinate movements and balance (gluten ataxia, celiac ataxia, some cases of sporadic idiopathic ataxia). In some cases, when symptoms are severe, this disorder mimics other disorders such as Parkinson’s, Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus, and even Alzheimer’s disease.
    Headaches are a very common symptom of wheat allergy, as well as gluten intolerance.  Migraines are common in those with celiac disease and gluten intolerance, as are sinus headaches.  These symptoms often decline dramatically after excluding gluten grains from the diet. Sinus problems are common in those with celiac disease, gluten intolerance, and sensitivity to dairy products as well, and are often reversible by making dietary changes. Some people with celiac disease seem to have an altered, highly acute sense of smell – for unknown reasons.
    Night blindness associated with vitamin A deficiency is reversible when malabsorption is resolved and with the addition of a vitamin A supplement. Xeropthalmia, or chronic, often severe, dry eyes, is also related to severe vitamin A deficiency.  It is rare in developed countries, but can be found in some people with malnutrition due to celiac disease.
    Apthous stomatitis is the name for the mouth ulcers associated with food allergies and intolerances, and is strongly associated with celiac disease and gluten intolerance. Even people who do not have gluten sensitivity get these once in a while but in those with gluten intolerance they are more frequent and especially long-lasting.  Dental enamel defects are strongly associated with celiac disease.  While they are usually identified in childhood, they can continue to cause problems throughout life, because they often lead to more frequent dental cavities.  Halitosis, or bad breath, is a reflection of our internal environment and gastrointestinal health, and is often present in those with untreated celiac disease, gluten sensitivity, or gut dysbiosis – an upset in the balance of our internal microorganisms caused by poor diet and other factors. And, one of the autoimmune disorders strongly associated with celiac disease, and one of the most prevalent is Sjogren’s syndrome, which impairs the normal production of body fluids like tears, saliva, and vaginal secretions
    Following the path our food takes to the stomach, we can look for effects in the esophagus too.  Eosinophilic esophagitis is a rarely encountered inflammation in the tissue of the esophagus which makes swallowing painful and difficult and can result in bleeding ulcerations.  When doctors do see it, they sometimes test for celiac disease, since there is a strong correlation.  Fortunately, in cases where this condition is caused by gluten intolerance, this painful chronic disorder clears up on a gluten free diet, too.
    Now we’re getting to the area most people associate with gluten intolerance – the gastro-intestinal system. In the past, celiac disease was usually described as causing gas, diarrhea, bloating, discomfort, cramping, and malabsorption.  But as you’ve already seen above, there is a whole lot more to this disorder, and we’re only halfway to the toes.
    In addition to the above symptoms, the body’s reaction to gluten can cause inflammation anywhere, but a common location is in the illeo-cecal junction and the cecum. This can sometimes be confused with appendicitis, or ovarian pain or an ovarian cyst in women experiencing right-sided lower abdominal discomfort.  Irritable bowel syndrome is suspected to affect at least 10-15% of adults (estimates vary). It is differentiated from IBD, or inflammatory bowel disorders (which include Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis). But, taken together, there are an awful lot of people out there with uncomfortable gut issues.  One fact to consider is that many of those with celiac disease were previously, and wrongly, misdiagnosed with IBS before discovering they actually had celiac disease.
    Let’s take a look at the urological system.  Even though gluten from the food we eat isn’t directly processed here, can it still be affected?  The answer is yes. Kidney problems in association with celiac disease are well documented, including oxalate kidney stones. Bladder problems are increasingly shown to be responsive to a gluten-free diet. This is kind of my specialty and I would estimate that about a quarter of those with interstitial cystitis, and many people with recurrent urinary tract infections, have a sensitivity to gluten. Even prostate inflammation in some men can be triggered by eating gluten grains.
    Sitting just atop the kidneys are our adrenal glands.  They have a difficult job, helping to direct our stress response system, our immune system, and our hormone output, and controlling inflammation in the body. Every time we experience a reaction to gluten, and our adrenals respond by sending out a surge of cortisol to help control inflammation, we are depleting our adrenal reserve.  When this happens chronically, over time, our adrenal system cannot keep up and becomes fatigued.  Symptoms of adrenal fatigue have far-reaching consequences throughout the body, including, of course, feeling fatigued and run down. But, adrenal fatigue can also affect our hormones, our blood sugar regulation, our mental acuity, our temperature regulation, and our ability to cope with food allergies, environmental allergies, and infections.
    Can the liver, the body’s largest internal organ, be affected by gluten intolerance too?  One example is autoimmune hepatitis, in which can be untreated celiac disease can be found in large numbers. Early screening testing for celiac disease is now strongly recommended for patients diagnosed with autoimmune hepatitis.
    The pancreas, which is key in blood sugar regulation, is highly affected by gluten intolerance.  Autoimmune disease triggers the development of Type I DM, and is becoming more closely associated with celiac disease.  Testing for celiac disease is now becoming a routine part of examination when a child develops Type I DM, and now that physicians are looking for celiac disease in juvenile diabetes, they’re finding it with greater frequency. Blood sugar regulation problems are also associated with non-diabetes hypoglycemia in those affected by gluten intolerance and appear to resolve with a low-glycemic gluten free diet.
    So, we’ve covered most of the body’s major internal systems. Now, let’s look at the extremities, our upper and lower limbs, where gluten-associated problems are also found. Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, a collagen disorder resulting in shoulder, elbow, and wrist joints that dislocate easily (and other characteristics) is a genetic disorder that may also be associated with celiac disease.  I had mild symptoms of this disorder as a child, but never knew it had a name until I ran across it recently.  With a child who has this disorder, a simple game of swinging a child by the arms, or swinging a child between two sets of their parent’s arms, can result in a trip to the emergency to put their joints back into proper alignment. This is not to say that a reaction to gluten causes this genetic disorder, but that if you have a personal or family history of Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome, and symptoms that may be related to celiac disease, you should consider being tested.
    Rheumatoid arthritis is another of the autoimmune disorders associated with celiac disease, and often affects the fingers with crippling joint deformation. Other joints in the body can also be affected. Scleroderma is another terribly disfiguring and sometimes fatal autoimmune disorder affecting every part of the body. It is often first identified in the extremities, particularly the fingers. In scleroderma, normal tissue loses it’s flexibility as the body’s autoimmune response produces inflammation and an overproduction of collagen.  Collagen is the tough fibrous protein that helps form connective tissues including tendons, bones, and ligaments. Excess collagen is deposited in the skin and body organs, eventually causing loss of function.  Scleroderma can be associated with celiac disease.
    The arms and legs are also common spots for yet another autoimmune disorder, psoriasis, to develop.  Some patients with psoriasis are responsive to a gluten-free diet, but unfortunately, not everyone. Another skin condition that often shows up on the arms is dermatitis herpetiformis (DH), although this itchy blistering skin rash can occur in other places as well.  Common sites are the backs of the elbows and the backs of the knees, or on the lower legs.
    Peripheral neuropathy is a disorder that results in numbness, tingling, and sometimes severe nerve pain in the extremities.  Finger, hands, toes, feet, and lower legs may all be affected. Although usually associated with diabetes, peripheral neuropathy shows up fairly frequently in those with celiac disease, and is fortunately reversible on a gluten free diet supplemented by B-vitamins and some specific amino acids.  Peripheral neuropathy is usually associated with older people, but some of the cases I’ve observed recently have been in very young children who had severe malabsorption issues.  Fortunately they healed quickly and their neuropathy symptoms resolved completely.
    There a few last symptoms related to malabsorption that tend to show up in those with celiac disease or gluten intolerance.  Easy bruising and bleeding, either due to a deficiency of Vitamin K, or to an autoimmune platelet disorder, is one. Rickets, or osteomalacia – a softening of the bones in the legs related to vitamin D deficiency – is another. As we said before, inflammation goes along with celiac disease and gluten intolerance, and a common site for inflammation is the lower extremities.  Sometimes this can be profound, and trigger doctors to think heart disease, but it’s often unresponsive to Lasix and other diuretics. This condition, too, may also clear up on a gluten-free diet.
    As for me, I’ll be happy to be gluten-free, from head to toe.


    Rivkah Roth D.O., D.N.M.
    Celiac.com 08/28/2012 - What's In A Name and When Does Celiac Predisposition Become A Disease?
    No doubt that global awareness about celiac disease and its possible involvement in a myriad of other (mostly autoimmune response related) conditions is growing. Growing, unfortunately, is confusion about terminologies and medical implications.


    The “Common” Understanding
    "Celiac disease" has become a generic blanket term not unlike how "Kleenex" today signifies no more than a box of tissue paper of any brand. So, in the public mind, "celiac disease" today stands for everything connected to a reaction to gluten.[1]
    Such an approach is highly imprecise and misses
    the need for distinction between non-celiac and/or celiac gluten sensitivity and the fact that a predisposition does not necessarily constitute disease.

    The 2012 Internationally Accepted Definition
    In an attempt to bring some clarity to the medical community, the world’s leading celiac minds earlier in 2012 met for an international convention in Oslo, Norway.[2]  During that convention, and after considering many of the most commonly used terms, they recognized

    …the presence of genetic, predisposing patterns…
    and called for a

    …distinction between "celiac disease" versus "gluten-related disorders"… [3]
    Let us be clear: This terminology refers solely to the underlying toxic effect of gluten rather than the possibly resulting disorders that may be based on other, additional triggers as well.


    Genotyping Tells Non-Celiac from Celiac Gluten Sensitivity
    Along with ever mounting genotype-related research, detailed HLA-DQ2/DQ8 human leukocyte antigen genotyping[4] today allows us to distinguish between predispositions to non-celiac and/or celiac gluten sensitivity (NCCGS) predisposition.
    Increasingly, research results link gluten issues to a considerable list of specific conditions and, therefore, allow for and promote a “natural” approach (i.e. gluten free diet and lifestyle) to resolve a complex panel of non-obvious signs and symptoms.
    Accordingly, "Celiac" is not (yet) a disease but a metabolic predisposition, i.e. the body’s inability to digest certain grain proteins, prolamines, etc.—much like a gasoline fueled car will sputter and eventually corrode on diesel fuel.


    Predisposition vs. Disease
    A genetic predisposition to celiac only becomes a disease (e.g. celiac disease or one of the non-celiac gluten sensitivity enabled conditions)[5] if the body’s inability to digest gluten and certain other grain proteins is ignored at the expense of the immune system.[6]
    In other words, an individual genetic predisposition to celiac only develops into full blown disease if that particular individual does not adhere to a gluten-free diet and lifestyle.
    An European Union et al commissioned research paper concluded:

    The environment clearly plays a crucial role in the development of celiac disease: No gluten, no disease!….
    …Because gluten is present in relatively large amounts in a variety of common food products, the daily gluten intake in a Western diet is high. In combination, we see that every HLA-DQ2– and/or -DQ8–positive individual is exposed to a large repertoire of immunogenic and abundant gluten peptides, and this may be an important factor determining disease development. There is, at present, no evidence linking additional environmental factors to celiac disease. [7]


    Big Business: Catering to a Gluten Free Diet
    The facts are everywhere and are illustrated further by these research abstract numbers posted on PubMed:
    18,565 on “celiac disease” (607 alone in 2012 – Jan. to Jly.) 9,689 on “gluten” (385 in 2012 – Jan. to Jly.) 3,447 on “glutenfree” (192 in 2012 – Jan. to Jly.) In addition, 38,878 abstracts deal with wheat research, whereof 1,862 in 2011, and 1,384 in 2012 to date (Jan. to Jly.).
    Clearly: $6.1bn spent 2011 on gluten-free foods in the USA—and a 30% growth from 2006 to 2010 in Canada to $2.64bn—indicate “Big Business” complete with the risk of missed, omitted, and mis-information for the goal of promoting greater consumption of gluten-free processed foods.
     
    The Challenge
    Our present naming confusion, therefore, may end up fuelling potential manipulation and mismanagement of the patient and consumer from the part of medical, pharmaceutical, supplement, and food industries.
    Even the above mentioned latest attempt at coordinating nomenclature and distinction between non-celiac and/or celiac gluten sensitivity brings with it several major flaws and challenges:
    It may take years for new naming conventions to become accepted throughout the international medical and dietary community. Recognizing a term such as "gluten-related disorders" or “non-celiac gluten sensitivity” calls for a total revamping of our medical and diagnostic systems in order for the large number (so far about 160) of autoimmune and other disorders to be recognized as gluten-related.   In addition, future questions will arise as research identifies and confirms more genetic links:
    Already, clinic practice shows that some of the "celiac" patients, previously diagnosed by positive intestinal biopsy[8] and serological findings now, on genotyping[9], turn out to carry "non-celiac" and not “celiac” gluten sensitivity alleles. Where does this leave such individuals on the traditionally used "celiac disease" versus "gluten-related disorder" specter?
    Clearly, despite good intention for a more precise naming distinction, it appears that additional work is needed in order to entrench new medical terminology and disease pictures.
     
    Conclusion
    Until then, whenever one of my patients receives a positive HLA gene test, I will adhere for clarity’s sake to the terms of “non-celiac” and/or “celiac gluten sensitivity” (NCCGS).
    This terminology refers solely to the underlying toxic effect of gluten and prevents a wrong implication of predisposition=disease diagnosis. Instead, “non-celiac and/or celiac gluten sensitivity” will simply point to the inherited underlying predisposition to specific additional triggers and complications if exposed to gluten.
    Most importantly, I will make sure to instill in my patients that disease is not the inevitable outcome of their genetic predisposition, and that a 100% gluten-free diet and lifestyle allows for avoidance, control, and perhaps even reversal of a complex web of interrelated autoimmune-based conditions and disorders, both for non-celiac and for celiac gluten sensitivity related disorders.

    [1] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22351716  Ann Intern Med. 2012 Feb 21;156(4):309-11. Nonceliac gluten sensitivity: sense or sensibility?
    [2] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22345659  Gut. 2012 Feb 16. [Epub ahead of print] The Oslo definitions for coeliac disease and related terms.
    [3] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19940509  Int Arch Allergy Immunol. 2010;152(1):75-80. Epub 2009 Nov 24. Differential mucosal IL-17 expression in two gliadin-induced disorders: gluten sensitivity and the autoimmune enteropathy celiac disease.
    [4] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22123644  Curr Opin Gastroenterol. 2012 Mar;28(2):104-12.  Advances in coeliac disease.
    [5] See future articles posted in these pages...  
    [6] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21787225  Int Rev Immunol. 2011 Aug;30(4):197-206.  Important lessons derived from animal models of celiac disease.
    [7] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC209453/?tool=pmcentrez  J Clin Invest. 2001 November 1; 108(9): 1261–1266. doi:  10.1172/JCI14344  PMCID: PMC209453  Interplay between genetics and the environment in the development of celiac disease: perspectives for a healthy life.
    [8] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22742547  Arch Pathol Lab Med. 2012 Jul;136(7):735-45.  An update on celiac disease histopathology and the road ahead.
    [9] http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21593645  J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2011 Jun;52(6):729-33.  HLA-DQ genotyping combined with serological markers for the diagnosis of celiac disease: is intestinal biopsy still mandatory?

    Maria Larkin, M.Ed, RDN/LD
    Celiac.com 02/16/2016 - About two years ago, as a result of two comprehensive review articles written by research scientists, Anthony Samsel and Stephanie Seneff, the term "glyphosates" made media headlines.
    Based on more than 200 citations, their reviews concluded that long term exposure to glyphosates via ingestion (in food and water) and/or inhalation seems to parallel the incidence and clinical features of celiac disease and may contribute to a number of diseases including autism, cancer, Parkinson's Disease, Alzheimer's Disease, infertility, depression, inflammatory bowel disease, Multiple Sclerosis, cancer, allergies, eosinophilic esophagitis (EOE), obesity, and kidney disorders.
    In case you don't already know, glyphosate (an organophosphate) is the active chemical ingredient in Monsanto's trademarked herbicide called RoundUp, which in the last 15 or more years has become very popular and is used throughout the world. It is largely used in "no-till non-organic production systems" as a desiccant (drying agent) for many genetically engineered (GE) food crops, especially those considered "RoundUp Ready" such as corn, soy, canola, cotton, sugar beets and alfalfa. RoundUp Ready foods are genetically engineered to resist being killed by RoundUp.
    While wheat is not a genetically engineered food crop, RoundUP is used on all non-organic wheat crops to produce a greater yield and reduce any rye grass weeds. The glyphosates in the RoundUp kill weeds by disrupting the shikimate pathway in the plant.
    I once used RoundUp to kill some weeds in my yard thinking that it was safe and nontoxic. It was thought then that humans and animals could not be affected by this weed-killing herbicide because humans and animals don't possess the shikimate pathway, only plants and bacteria do.
    That was until Samsel and Seneff set me straight. The bacteria in the human gut, which outnumbers the cells in our body, do have shikimate pathways. Glyphosates suppress the enzyme necessary for the shikimate pathway to produce aromatic amino acids such as tyrosine, tryptophan and phenylalanine. This happens in plant cells, too, where reduced levels of other amino acids have been discovered including serine, glycine and methionine.
    What does this mean for we humans? These amino acids are precursors to neurotransmitters (found in the gut and in the brain). Tryptophan alone is necessary for the production of serotonin, "the happy hormone." An impaired supply of serotonin frequently found in celiac disease causes depression. Impaired serotonin receptors in the gut sets the stage for inflammatory bowel disease.
    So besides blocking the shikimate pathway for the production of nutrients in foods, glyphosates seem to reduce the overall bioavailability of nutrients in the foods we eat. I have been a regular advocate for taking a daily multi vitamin and mineral, contending that the food we eat may lose nutrients from farm to table. Low and behold, Samsel and Seniff's review substantiated my contention. They cite two studies, which showed multiple mineral depletions in soybean crops treated with glyphosates. The depleted nutrients in the soybeans mirrored those frequently found in celiac disease, including cobalamin (B12), iron, molybdenum, selenium and sulfur. The authors hypothesize that the association between celiac disease and autoimmune hypothyroid disease may be due to a selenium deficiency.
    Samsel and Seniff suspect that chelation in the gut due to glyphosate ingestion may further account for deficiencies in cobalt, molybdenum and iron in these foods. This confirms yet another contention of mine that a single nutrient can indeed disrupt a whole system. The chelation of cobalamin in the gut is suspected to contribute to neurodegeneration and heart disease; the synergistic dynamic of molybdenum deficiency altering the body's supply of sulfate can have the consequence of cancer, anemia and insulin resistance. The authors purport that glyphosates disruption of the sulfur transport in the body is "the most important consequence of glyphosate's insidious slow erosion of health."
    The health of the human intestinal tract is affected by glyphosate ingestion and inhalation. Citing a study on the effects of glyphosates on predatory fish, Samsel and Seneff's review showed that glyphosates cause damage to the intestinal mucosal folds and microvilli similar to what is seen in celiac disease. Beneficial gut bacteria are killed, allowing the pathogenic (disease-causing) bacteria to proliferate, producing a state of bacterial dysbiosis (microbial imbalance). With reductions in the beneficial Bifidobacteria and Lactobacillus bacteria, the breakdown of both gluten and phytase are impaired, leading to the inability to digest gluten. The pathogenic bacteria such as E. Coli and C. Difficile can lead to kidney failure and inflammation. These authors argue that other digestive pathologies, such as pancreatitis, fatty liver disease and EOE are due to impaired CYP function in the liver. Could there also be a link between the high rates of small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) and gut dysbiosis caused by glyphosate disruption of these enzymes?
    Glyphosates disruption of CYP enzymes in the liver occurs with celiac disease. These enzymes are involved in detoxification of xenobiotics (foreign chemical substances), so theoretically a reduction of CYP enzymes slows detoxification. Vitamin D3 and cholesterol synthesis and regulation of retinoic acid are also a part of the CYP enzyme system. It has puzzled me at times, that some of my patients do not respond to high dose vitamin D supplementation. The concept that glyphosates effect on CYP enzyme inhibition results in inadequate vitamin D activation in the liver could be a mystery solved. CYP enzymes are also important in bile acid production, gallbladder and pancreatic function. Samsel and Seneff hypothesize that glyphosate "disrupts the transport of sulfate from the gut to the liver and pancreas", resulting in bile acid insufficiency and gall bladder disease. Excess retinoic acid as a result of glyphosate exposure is similarly found in celiac disease and has been linked to reproductive disorders.
    How can we avoid glyphosate exposure? The obvious answer is not to use this herbicide to kill weeds in your yard. In the best interest of health, eat organic foods as much as possible, avoid the "the dirty 15" and genetically engineered foods. Check out your local farmer's market and buy from certified organic farmers. Eat animal products fed with non- genetically engineered foods. If you eat wheat, choose organic wheat. Glyphosates cannot be washed off of food, and there is yet no known way of detoxifying glyphosates from the body. The authors suggest eat garlic or soak in an Epsom salts bath to ensure adequate sulfur intake. Sea salt is a natural way to include minerals in your diet along with eating vegetables.
    Maria Larkin, M.Ed, RDN/LD owns Better Gut Better Health, LLC, a nutrition counseling practice in Durham and Portsmouth, NH. She is a registered dietitian and functional medicine provider, specializing in gastrointestinal concerns, food allergies and sensitivities. Website: www.bettergutbetterhealth.com.
    References:
    Samsel, A. and Seneff, S. Glyphosate's Suppression of Cytochrome P450 Enzymes and Amino Acid Biosynthesis by the Gut Microbiome: Pathways to Modern Diseases. Entropy, 2013: 15 (4): 1416-1463. Samsel, A. and Seneff, S. Glyphosate, pathways to modern diseases II: Celiac sprue and gluten intolerance. Interdisciplinary Toxicology, 2013: 6 (4): 159-184.

    Amie  Valpone
    Celiac.com 04/05/2016 - These fresh-tasting burgers make an easy weeknight meal. No buns here; you can serve these wrapped in romaine or Bibb lettuce leaves and eat them with your hands. Make sure your millet isn't too dry or the burgers won't stick together!
    Serves 6
    Ingredients:
    1 cup millet ½ teaspoon sea salt, plus a pinch for cooking millet 1 tablespoon ground flax seeds 3 tablespoons water 1 large carrot, peeled and grated 4 scallions, thinly sliced 1 handful fresh basil leaves, finely chopped 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice 2 ½ teaspoons freshly grated lemon zest ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 3 tablespoons coconut oil 6 large romaine or Bibb lettuce leaves 1 recipe Mango Salsa, for serving Large drizzle Cumin Cashew Cream Sauce, for serving Directions:
    Cook the millet with a pinch of salt. Set aside to cool.
    Combine the flax seeds and water in a small bowl; set aside for 10 minutes until the mixture forms a gel, then mix well.
    While the millet is cooking, combine the carrots, scallions, basil, lemon juice, lemon zest, salt, and pepper in a large bowl. Once the millet is cool, add it to the bowl with the flax seed mixture and mix well. Using your hands, shape the mixture into six burgers.
    In a large skillet, heat the oil over medium heat. Place the burgers in the pan and cook until golden brown, 7 to 8 minutes on each side. Serve warm wrapped in lettuce leaves with a dollop of Mango Salsa and a drizzle of Cumin Cashew Cream Sauce on top. Uncooked burgers will keep for up to 4 days in the refrigerator or 1 month in the freezer, stored between pieces of parchment paper in a sealed container.
    Mango Salsa
    Makes 1 ½ cups
    Ingredients:
    1 ripe mango, peeled, pitted, and finely diced 1 medium English cucumber, finely diced 3 tablespoons finely diced red onion 3 teaspoons finely chopped fresh cilantro 2 teaspoons freshly squeezed lime juice Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste Directions:
    Combine all of the ingredients in a large bowl; toss to combine, and serve. Add more red onion, if desired, for a spicier salsa. Serve immediately.
    Cumin Cashew Cream Sauce
    Makes 1 ½ cups
    Ingredients:
    1 cup raw cashews
    ¾ cup water
    ¼ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
    ½ teaspoon ground cumin
    ¼ teaspoon sea salt
    Directions:
    Combine all of the ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth. Serve chilled or at room temperature. Store leftover sauce in a sealed container in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.
    Text excerpted from EATING CLEAN, © 2016 by AMIE VALPONE. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. Author/Recipe photo © LAUREN VOLO.

    Betty Wedman-St Louis, PhD, RD
    Celiac.com 04/12/2016 - Vitamin B12 is a group of cobalt containing compounds described by Alan R. Gaby, M.D. in Nutritional Medicine called cobalamins. Methylcobalamin is the coenzyme form of B12 that is critical for human health. Hydroxocobalamin is a more stable form of B12 but it first needs to be converted to an active form before use in metabolism.
    Vitamin B12 is important in DNA synthesis, red blood cell formation, homocysteine metabolism and the production of S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe). Adequate B12 is essential for proper neurological and immune function.
    The importance of Vitamin B12 in health and anemia management began during the Depression era when animal protein foods were limited in the American diet. Three physicians who reversed pernicious anemia in dogs were awarded the 1934 Nobel Prize for medicine. Dr. George Hoyt Whipple and two other physicians fed the dogs and humans 1/2 pound of fresh liver per day as a means to control anemia.
    Animal proteins—meat, poultry, fish, eggs—are the sources of Vitamin B12 for humans. Plants do not need or produce B12. How B12 gets into your blood is a complex dance of stomach acids and intrinsic factors that starts with pepsin in the stomach splitting off the B12 from the protein compound. The intrinsic factor made by the parietal cells of the stomach attaches to the B12 to be shuttled to the ileum where receptors pull it into the blood.
    Once in the blood, B12 is picked up by transcobalamin to be carried to cells throughout the body. Any excess is stored in the liver or excreted in the urine.
    If inadequate intrinsic factor is available—loss from aging or proton pump inhibitor use—B12 deficiency symptoms such as macrocytic anemia, neurological disorders and psychiatric symptoms (memory loss, depression, confusion, paranoia) may occur. Severe B12 deficiency can result in intestinal damage, hyper-pigmentation of the skin, hypotension, and immune dysfunction.
    The Institute of Medicine indicates that only 2 to 4 mcg Vitamin B12 is needed daily. The average American diet contains 5-15 mcg per day according to NHANES studies. Vegetarians and infants breastfed by vegan mothers are at greatest risk of developing B12 deficiency.
    Other factors increase the risk of developing Vitamin B12 insufficiency. Achlorydria secondary to gastritic, gastric bypass surgery, and ileal resection for Crohn’s disease need assessment due to malabsorption. Apathy abounds throughout the medical community despite the 2009 Centers for Disease Control and Prevention statistics indicating 1 out of every 31 people over 50 being B12 deficient. With increasing numbers of gastric bypass patients and Crohn’s resections, this deficiency could be significantly higher.
    Adverse symptoms can first be noted with the CBC test indicating large RBC or macrocytosis—a folate and B12 deficiency. Other symptoms may include balance problems, numb hands and feet, leg pains, early onset dementia, pre-Parkinson’s-like disease, infertility and depression.
    Many physicians are poorly educated on Vitamin B12 importance since it is a vitamin and easy to treat. Treatment with methylcobalamin injections with few definitive ways to test efficacy seems to be a primary factor. A complete medical history assessing for gut inflammation, celiac disease, GERD, recent nitric oxide use in surgery, and genetic factors like MTHFR should trigger a closer look at B12 adequacy even with a normal homocysteine (HCY) plasma test. High levels of B12 on standard blood analysis usually indicates poor absorption and not intoxification of Vitamin B12. Elevated B12 results >800pg/ml frequently indicate PPI use or low stomach acid malabsorption. Lab results <350pg/ml may still be inadequate for a patient with celiac disease, gluten enteropathy or gastric bypass surgery, so supplementation should be considered.
    Medications matter when considering Vitamin B12 status. Below are common drugs that impair absorption:
    Antacids- maalox, MOM, Mylanta, Tums Histamine blockers- Zantac, Tagamet, Axid, Pepcid Proton Pump Inhibitors- Prevacid, Prilosec, Nexium,. Omeprazole, Acidhex Colchicine Questran Metformin, Glucophage Celexa, Effexor, Elavil, Nardil, Paxil, Prozac, Zoloft, Wellbutrin Ativan, Librium, Valium, Xanax Viagra, Cialis, Levitra Compazine, Haldol, Risperdal, Tegretal Vitamin B12 supplementation is probably the safest medical treatment available. Many people need B12 injections to show improvement in their symptoms. Effectiveness of injections depends more on frequency of administration than on amount given with each injection. Those who improve with injections rarely improve with oral or sublingual products no matter how large the dose because the routes of administration are not capable of achieving high enough absorption levels.
    Treatment with Vitamin B12 needs to be continued for life. Until more research on efficacy and safety of oral B12 is available, intramuscular daily or weekly injections should be considered a standard of care, especially in celiac disease and those with gastric bypass surgery.
    A 20 page handout on Digestive Wellness is available for $15 from Dr. Betty Wedman-St Louis, 17920 Gulf Blvd, Ste 606, St. Petersburg, FL 33708. It includes information on how GMO foods destroy health which will be covered in a future article.

    Tina Turbin
    Celiac.com 05/17/2016 - The paleolithic diet, or paleo diet which happens to be gluten-free, has been growing increasingly popular among athletes and health advocates, but it has a history dating back to the mid-1970's as a means of preventing diseases and health conditions such as autoimmune diseases and cancer, when investigations were made of the eating patterns of our hunter-gatherer ancestors.
    The paleo gluten-free diet, the "biologically appropriate" diet, is named for the Paleolithic era, which extended 2.5 million years ending in 10,000 B.C. with the advent of agriculture and animal husbandry. It's comprised of the foods our human ancestors consumed during this period, namely wild-caught fish, grass-fed meats, fruits, vegetables, roots, and nuts. Any "modern" foods introduced from the agricultural era forward such as grains, dairy, sugar, and processed foods are eliminated.
    People all over have found the paleo gluten-free diet is an effective answer for weight loss, optimizing health and fitness—and building muscle tone. According to research, pre-agricultural humans were free of the diseases of the civilized world such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, obesity, and autoimmune diseases. Modern studies, including clinical studies, have shown as well that the paleo diet and the restoration of the lifestyle conditions of our ancestors, such as exercise, have resolved numerous diseases.
    The theory behind the diet, supported by extensive archeological and anthropological evidence, is based on the premise that modern humans do best on paleolithic nutrition because human genetics have largely remained the same since the pre-agricultural era and thus our genetic makeup is best suited to the ancestral human diet.
    If you're looking to build muscle tone, meet with a qualified health practitioner to see if the diet is for you. I think you'll find that whatever your reason for starting the paleo diet and lifestyle, whether to optimize your fitness routine, lose weight, alleviate autoimmune disease symptoms such as celiac disease, or increase your longevity, eating in the biologically appropriate way for our bodies not only has the power to change your body and your health, but your quality of life.
    While many people are eating paleo gluten-free as a way to correct health conditions or improve their overall health, active individuals and athletes have been following the diet in order to lose fat and build muscle more efficiently, according to MuscleMag.
    In fact, one of the best known proponents of the paleo diet, Robb Wolf, former biochemist and author of The Paleo Solution, regards the diet as performance-enhancing and trains world-class athletes at his gym in Chico, California.
    According to Robb, our human ancestors were taller, leaner, and better built than humans now, as anthropological evidence shows us. According to MuscleMag, only during the last 10,000 years, since the advent of agriculture, have humans consumed grains, legumes and dairy—and during this same period, humans have also become "significantly shorter, fatter, less muscular and more prone to disease," as anthropological studies point out. Let's take a look at some of the reasons why the paleo gluten-free diet is optimum for building muscle tone.
    The paleo gluten-free diet, consisting wholly of unprocessed foods like seafood, lean meat, fruits and vegetables, nuts and roots, is much more nutritious than the foods from the Neolithic era and beyond. The optimal nutritional intake on the paleo gluten-free diet is a vital part of developing muscle tone.
    Although you'll hear grain advocates singing the praises of the fiber and B vitamin content of grains, you'll actually find more of these nutrients in grain-free foods, as long as you eat a variety of nutrient-rich whole foods. According to GrainFreeLifestyle.com, "If you can find the nutrient in grain, you can find the nutrient in better quantities in other foods." For example, 100 grams of whole wheat flour contains 44 mcg of folate, but a 100-gram serving of lamb liver yields 400 mcg of folate and a 100-gram serving of yard-long beans offers 658 mcg. Also, 100 grams of cooked brown rice has 1.8 grams of dietary fiber, whereas a 100-gram serving of cooked collard greens has 2.8 grams and green peas offer approximately 5 grams of fiber per serving.
    In fact, grains that are poorly prepared, which is most often the case, can prevent the absorption of vitamins and minerals. Your diet may be rich in nutrients, but if it's also rich in improperly prepared grains, you won't be able to absorb them due to substances in grain such as phytic acid, which binds with minerals so you can't absorb them properly.
    Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye. The paleo diet is a naturally gluten-free diet because it is a grain-free diet. Studies show that 1% of the population has celiac disease, an autoimmune condition triggered by the ingestion of gluten, which causes the immune system to attack the lining of the digestive tract and inhibits the proper absorption of nutrients from your food.
    But experts are saying that a large proportion of non-celiac individuals are suffering from gluten intake as well. Some researchers estimate that as much as 40% of the population is also sensitive or downright intolerant to gluten, which can lead to the same symptoms and conditions of celiac disease. Celiac disease and gluten sensitivity are severely undiagnosed, and it could be the case that you yourself have gluten issues.
    Not only grains but other Neolithic and modern foods, such as legumes, dairy products, sugar, and processed oils can irritate the digestive tract as well. For example, legumes contain antinutrients such as lectins, saponins, and protease inhibitors, which cause damage to the intestines and hormonal and immune systems, leading to inflammation and increasing the risk of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. All soy products and peanuts are actually classified as legumes and are to be avoided on the paleo gluten-free diet.
    With intestinal inflammation, nutrient absorption is severely limited, especially when it comes to protein. Furthermore, the inflammatory response in the gut can spread throughout the body. This systemic inflammation can lead to the retaining of water as well as weakening the immune system, while a strong immune system is vital when it comes to recovering from intense exercise and building muscle.
    Let's dive into how to get superior sources of protein, weaning off of detrimental grains and improve muscle tone and exercise recovery time in the next issue.

    Amie  Valpone
    Celiac.com 05/31/2016 - Dipping your spoon into this bell pepper–sweet potato combo is like dipping into a bowl of sunshine. It's stunning—and the perfect antidote to a gloomy winter's day. This soup also freezes well, so if you're not serving a crowd, store the leftovers for a later date (or make a double batch). I like to enjoy this soup accompanied by my Massaged Kale Salad with Spicy Hazelnuts
    Serves 6 to 8
    Ingredients:
    ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil ½ small onion, diced 2 medium carrots, peeled and diced 1 celery stalk, diced Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste 8 yellow, red and/or orange bell peppers, chopped 1 large sweet potato, peeled and chopped 4 cups low-sodium vegetable broth 3 teaspoon finely chopped fresh marjoram 1 recipe Gluten-Free Herbed Croutons, for garnish Sliced avocado, for garnish; optional Finely chopped fresh cilantro, for garnish; optional Drizzle Seriously Sensational Sriracha Sauce, for garnish; optional Directions:
    In a large pot, heat the oil over medium heat. Add the onion, carrot, celery, and a pinch of salt and black pepper. Cook until the vegetables are tender, about 4 minutes. Add the bell peppers and cook until soft, about 6 minutes. Add the sweet potatoes and broth. Season with salt and black pepper, cover the pot, and bring to a boil. Lower the heat and add the marjoram. Simmer until the vegetables are tender, about 20 minutes.
    Let the soup cool slightly, and then, in batches, transfer to a blender and puree until smooth. If needed, thin the soup with water. Adjust the seasoning with salt and black pepper if necessary. Return the soup to the pot to keep warm until serving. Serve garnished with the Herbed Croutons and, if desired, the avocado and cilantro on top and Seriously Sensational Sriracha Sauce on the side.
    Text excerpted from EATING CLEAN, © 2016 by AMIE VALPONE. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved.

    Monique Attinger
    Celiac.com 06/07/2016 - The world of nutrition is currently obsessed with "super foods". Super foods are loosely defined as foods that are extremely high in nutrients – particularly antioxidants and vitamins – and which everyone is heartily advised to add to their diet.
    The problem with this approach is that, while focused firmly on nutrients, we are ignoring anti-nutrients! According to Wikipedia, an anti-nutrient is a compound in food that interferes with your absorption of other nutrients from a food. Most foods have varying amounts of anti-nutrients, toxins and other problematic compounds. A truly healthy diet will include weighing the good against the bad, while maintaining as much variety as possible. Once we have a clearer picture of how a food helps to support our nutrition, we can then decide how to include it in our diet and in what amount.
    Obviously, certain health conditions mean that certain foods are no longer healthful. For those with celiac disease, this means that grains with gluten in them are damaging to their health. It really doesn't matter how healthy wheat bran is for some – for celiacs, wheat bran is harmful. For those with allergies, you have a similar issue. Foods that may be healthy for some may not be for others.
    Another issue with food and health can be related to anti-nutrients. For instance, in the vegetarian world, we now hear more about phytate – often found in legumes – and how to reduce it in a plant-based diet. Salicylate is another anti-nutrient found in plant foods, and more people are finding that they need to consider this when choosing foods.
    Plants may also contain toxins, which are totally natural to the plant, but not good for you. Wikipedia indicates that a toxin is a substance that is directly poisonous, and capable of causing disease. For instance, some foods may contain naturally occurring cyanide compounds, or even arsenic in various forms. While we may not get enough to cause immediate problems, we certainly don't want to consume a lot of these toxins!
    Oxalate is another toxin present in many otherwise healthy foods. Oxalate poses many challenges for human health. It's a free radical. It promotes inflammation in your body. Because of its biochemistry, oxalate can be stored throughout your body, and can be particularly concentrated at the sites of previous injury, inflammation or surgery. Fundamentally, oxalate can be stored in tissues wherever the cells have taken it up. As a result, if you are someone who is absorbing too much oxalate from your diet, you can be contributing substantial stress to your body.
    Reducing the amount of oxalate in your diet cannot hurt you – you are reducing a totally non-nutritive substance for which the human body has no need and which contributes directly to health issues.
    However, reducing too many food types or nutrients in your diet can have negative impacts. The greater the variety in your diet, the better the chance that you are getting all your needed nutrients. The good news is that you can have a nutritious, high variety diet, and retain "super foods" in your diet which are high nutrition, gluten-free and low oxalate.
    Get Your Fiber
    The preponderance of processed foods in our diets can often leave us with hardly any fiber in our diet! Many gluten-free options are very low in fiber, and this can affect gut health. Fiber is not a direct nutrient for us per se – but it is a needed component that contributes to better gut flora and better health overall.
    Insoluble fiber adds bulk to the stool and promotes regularity. Most of us are not getting enough of this fiber, and as a result, can develop poor motility and constipation.
    Given that many whole grains are not good alternatives for those on a gluten-free diet, and the bran of many grains are actually high in oxalate, how can we get more healthy insoluble fiber? The good news is that one nutritional powerhouse is not only full of healthy insoluble fiber – it's also a plant source of Omega 3's. So a great solution to lack of insoluble fiber is flax seeds.
    Flax seeds can be eaten whole – but to really get the best benefits from this super food, it's best to grind your flax. Keep whole flax seeds in the freezer to preserve their freshness, and don't grind until just before using them. The recommended daily serving (which will also provide some soluble fiber) is two tablespoons.
    According to the Mayo Clinic, the right fiber goes much further than just regularity. If you increase soluble fiber, it can help reduce both blood sugar and cholesterol. Soluble fiber creates a gel-like material in the gut, and some research indicates that it may help to feed our gut bacteria.
    The benefits of soluble fiber are well known when it comes to cholesterol. The recommended food to get more soluble fiber is oats. However, whole oats are high in oxalate, and the oat bran has confusing test data.
    The solution? Psyllium! Pysllium is the medicinal ingredient in the popular product, Metamucil. Psyllium contains both soluble and insoluble fiber – and research on it shows that it can help to reduce cholesterol as well as normalize blood sugar. You can add it to baked products (but adjust the liquids), or sprinkle on foods. It's virtually tasteless – although you might find it does add some thickness or texture to liquids or foods.
    Fruits and vegetables are also good sources of both soluble and insoluble fiber and many are lower oxalate. Cabbages, lettuces, onions, cucumbers (with the skin) red bell peppers, orange, mango and grapes are all good low oxalate sources of fiber in your diet.
    Fruits
    There is no shortage of healthy options in fresh fruits that are also low oxalate, but the blueberry holds a special place among even the healthiest fruits.
    Research shows that blueberries are one of the most antioxidant rich foods available, and are included in most lists of super foods. Blueberries are one of the highest rated foods on the ORAC scale. The ORAC scale was developed by researchers at Tufts University, and is the measure of Oxygen Radical Absorbance Capacity (hence the abbreviation ORAC). What this really means for you is that the higher something ranks on the ORAC scale, the more antioxidants you are getting.
    Blueberries are stars on this scale, with an ORAC value of 4,669 per 100 grams, according to Superfoodly.com. Wild blueberries rank higher than cultivated ones – but you can't go wrong with any blueberry.
    Another fruit that ranks very high in ORAC is the lowly cranberry. While very tart (and difficult to eat raw), cranberries are second only to blueberries in antioxidant levels. To reduce the acidity of the fruit, and make them more palatable, cook with water and some honey. Cranberries are very easy to cook and make a lovely side dish for fattier meats like lamb. They aren't just for turkey anymore! Consuming these tangy fruits also help to contribute to bladder health.
    For nutrition on the go, turn to golden seedless raisins. While dark raisins are tasty treats, the golden seedless variety is both lower in oxalate and higher in antioxidants. In fact, golden seedless raisins actually have a higher ORAC score than fresh blueberries! Combine that with convenience and portability, and you have an easy way to get more antioxidants in your day. Raisins also make a great treat for kids, because of their sweetness.
    Is the apple a super food? Yes it is! Easy to purchase and pack for lunch, this popular fruit is full of quercetin, which protects cells from damage and is often recommended for those with allergies. Not only is it full of healthy antioxidants, it also has twice the fiber of other commonly eaten fruits, including peaches, grapes and grapefruit, according to the site EverydayHealth.com.
    Veggies
    When looking at veggies, many of the foods that are considered most healthy are also very high in oxalate. Everyone talks today about how healthy the sweet potato is for us: but did you know that a ½ cup of sweet potato can have over 90 mg of oxalate in it? For people trying to eat a low oxalate diet, a single serving would be more oxalate than they should consume in a whole day!
    However, while avoiding high oxalate foods, you do need to eat color and variety to get your needed nutrition. If you want a lower carbohydrate, orange veggie – consider the kabocha squash. Not only does this lower carb, low oxalate veggie work as a substitute for many recipes that require sweet potato, it also has a very good nutrient profile. Self Nutrition Data lists Vitamin A and Vitamin C as well as a good serving of Folate, in addition to good amounts of calcium, magnesium, phosphorus and potassium.
    Of course, you want other colors in your veggies as well – and green leafy veggies are particularly known for their nutrition. While spinach would be a bad choice because of extremely high oxalate, you have lots of other greens to choose from. Focus on lower oxalate varieties of kale, including purple kale. The website, The World's Healthiest Foods, lists kale as a food that can lower cholesterol (if steamed) as well as lower your risk of cancer. Of course, kale is part of the cruciferous vegetable family, and these foods have many anti-cancer benefits. Kale is an excellent source of Vitamin K (your blood clotting factor), as well as vitamin A, vitamin C, manganese, copper, B6 and others.
    Don't forget your other brassicas while you are focusing on kale! The cruciferous veggies also support our bodies natural detox processes, which is very valuable in today's world where we are exposed to many environmental toxins. Broccoli is another low oxalate brassica that is good for you, whether you are eating the mature broccoli heads, or feasting on broccoli sprouts. Note that broccoli sprouts do have an edge over their more mature cousins – they might just taste better, and given that they can be added to a sandwich for some satisfying crunch, might be easier to work into your daily diet. Research gives the sprouts a further edge in cancer risk reduction and some research indicates they may actually help to prevent stomach cancer.
    Another excellent leafy green is the lowly turnip green. Turnip greens are very high in calcium, and are even lower in oxalate than kale. A cup of cooked turnip greens will also get you more than 100% of the RDA for vitamin K. In addition, you'll get vitamin A, vitamin C, folate, copper, manganese, calcium, and vitamin E. Each serving will give you 15% of your daily requirement for B6.
    When thinking of deep red veggies, go for red cabbage. This versatile veggie is very low in oxalate, and that lovely red color means that it has even more protective phytonutrients, according to World's Healthiest Foods, than its green sibling! One serving of red cabbage delivers more than four times the polyphenols of green cabbage.
    Fats and Oils
    You can't read on super food nutrition anywhere and not run into the avocado. A great source of healthy monounsaturated fat, the avocado has also been linked to reduced risk of cancer, as well as lowered risk of heart disease and diabetes. While we think of avocados as a fatty food, they are actually a good source of fiber, with 11 to 17 grams of fiber per fruit! You'll also get a dose of lutein, an antioxidant recommended for eye health.
    Web MD says that lutein is a potent antioxidant, which is found in high concentrations in the eye. The combination of lutein and zeaxanthin (another antixodant) help to protect your eyes from damaging, high energy light. Some research indicates that a diet high in lutein and zeaxanthin may reduce the risk of cataracts by as much as 50%.
    Coconut oil is another excellent fat that can benefit our bodies in a host of ways. Doctor Oz lists a number of benefits, including supporting thyroid health and blood sugar control. This may be related to the form of saturated fat that is found in coconut oil, called lauric acid. Lauric acid is a medium-chain triglyceride. This kind of fat actually boosts immune system, and has antibiotic, antiviral and antifungal properties. It may also be a tool in your weight loss arsenal. A study in 2009 actually showed the eating 2 Tablespoons of coconut oil daily, allowed subjects to lose belly fat more effectively. Even better news for those who are following a low oxalate diet: both avocado and coconut oil have zero oxalate!
    Nuts, Seeds and Legumes
    Unfortunately, many foods in this category are high oxalate – and so won't qualify for our super food list. While you might be able to have a couple of walnut halves, or a similar amount of pecans, nuts are generally just to high to have in servings of more than 3-5 pieces.
    However, if you are looking for a superfood in this category, look no further than pumpkin seeds! Pumpkin seeds are an excellent source of vegetable-based protein, and are another portable food. A great snack for the health conscious can be made with raisins and pumpkin seeds – both are low oxalate, and the protein of the pumpkin seeds will help you to stay fuller longer. According to LiveStrong.com, a handful of pumpkin seeds will give you over 8 grams of protein. At the same time, pumpkin seeds are low in sugar, and provide you with fiber as part of the carbohydrate in them. You will also get vitamin A, vitamin B, vitamin K, thiamine, riboflavin, niacin, magnesium, calcium, iron, manganese, zinc, potassium, copper and phosphorus in that small and compact package!
    If pumpkin seeds don't qualify as a super food, it's hard to say what would!
    When it comes to legumes, many are stars for protein, but one of the best options is the red lentil. Lentils in general are easier to prepare than other types of legumes – they do not require the soaking and preparation time that many legumes do. At the same time, they are powerhouses of nutrition, with molybdenum, folate, fiber, copper, phosphorus and manganese all at more than 50% of your daily requirement. One cup of cooked lentils will also give you 36 % of your daily need for protein, according to World's Healthiest Foods. And all this nutrition is provided in a food that is virtually fat free and low in calories. You cannot go wrong!
    As an added benefit, some studies have found that eating high fiber foods like red lentils may reduce the risk of heart disease. The more fiber, the lower the risk of heart disease.
    Fish
    We are always hearing that we need to have more fish in our diets. It seems sometimes that not a week goes by when we are not hearing that we should be eating less meat, and getting less fat – with the suggestion that more fish would benefit us.
    When you think of the super food of fish, you have to think of salmon. Salmon is a fatty fish, and it's one of the best sources available for omega-3 fatty acids. In today's world of processed foods, omega-3's are one of the nutrients that we don't get enough of.
    Your best bet with salmon is to get wild-caught fish. Farmed salmon do not have the same nutrient profile, which may be related to the kind of food they are fed. Along with the decreased nutrient profile, studies have indicated that farmed salmon contains significantly higher concentrations of a number of contaminants (including PCBs, dieldrins, toxaphenes, dioxins and chlorinated pesticides) than wild caught salmon.
    World's Healthiest Foods states that a 4 ounce piece of Coho salmon will get you 55% of your daily requirements for omega-3 fats. On top of that, you'll get more than 50% of your daily requirement for vitamin B12, vitamin D, selenium, vitamin B3, protein and phosphorus, as well as other B vitamins and minerals.
    Omega-3 fatty acids will provide you a host of benefits, from reduction of inflammation, to better brain function. Omega-3 fat is also heart healthy, and can contribute to a reduced risk of heart attack, stroke, high blood pressure and other cardiovascular disease. Research indicates that eating salmon at least 2 to 3 times a week will give you the best benefits.
    Spice it up
    Spices can be a bit tricky, if you want to keep your oxalate low. Many spices – while tasty – are very high in oxalate!
    A great example of this is turmeric. A staple in most curry recipes, turmeric is extremely high oxalate – so while it has a reputation as a super food, it would not be a good choice if you are trying to keep your oxalate low.
    So what is your option if you love to eat foods spiced with turmeric? Well, the easiest approach is to stock your spice rack with a health food store supplement; cook with curcumin extract! While it may seem a bit odd at first, if you buy a curcumin extract (which is the extract from turmeric), you can get the flavor and leave the oxalate behind.
    While not technically a "food" when you cook with a supplement, you certainly get all the benefits of the original super food – turmeric – without the downside of oxalate.
    Another highly beneficial spice is cinnamon. Research clearly shows how helpful cinnamon is for managing blood sugar. However, ground cinnamon is an extremely high oxalate spice. So how can you get the flavor you want, while avoiding the oxalate?
    One solution is to cook with a cinnamon extract that you buy at the health food store! One brand known to be low oxalate is Doctor's Best. It is a dry extract in capsules – simply break open the capsules and use the contents in your dish. This allows you to get all the therapeutic benefits of the extract as well as the taste.
    You can also cook with essential oils and culinary oils – but use them carefully. Essential oils can be very strong and can irritate the tissues of the mouth and digestive tract. One drop of good quality essential cinnamon oil will replace as much as 1 tablespoon of ground cinnamon. Culinary oils are made for flavoring – follow the directions on the product that you buy. Either way, you will get the taste – and you avoid the oxalate.
    Enjoying Your Food!
    As with anyone who wants to eat a healthy diet full of super foods, the trick is to focus on the best nutrition, and get lots of variety. While some foods may not be as "super" as others, if you are making colorful meals, with healthful selections from across the spectrum, you'll be doing your body a favor with flavor!
    Where Does Oxalate Go?
    Once you have eaten oxalate, you have to excrete it through urine, feces or sweat. But what happens if you don't? A study on rats was able to trace where in the body a dose of oxalate remained. The scientists used a special carbon molecule – carbon 14 – in the oxalate they gave to the rats, so that they could find the oxalate wherever it went in the body.
    What they found is that if the oxalate was not excreted from the body, it was stored everywhere:
    68% in the bones 9% in the spleen 8% in the adrenal glands 3% in the kidneys 3% in the liver 8% in the rest of the body These results are in direct opposition to conventional medical thinking, that oxalate only affects the kidneys. It clearly shows us that the whole body – but particularly the bones, key glands and detoxification organs – are all affected. This is another good reason to reduce the amount of oxalate in your diet!
    Is Spinach Really That Bad For You?
    A relatively simple study in the late 1930's looked at rats fed a diet that was only adequate in calcium. To bring the levels of calcium up, the rats were given spinach, equaling about 8% of their diet. While most of us think of spinach in terms of iron, it is also relatively high in calcium. The results of the study were shocking:
    47. A high percentage of rats died between the age of 21 days and 90 days 48. The bones of the rats were extremely low in calcium (despite adding it to the diet through the spinach) 49. Tooth structure was poor and dentine of the teeth poorly calcified 50. For these animals, reproduction was impossible. Researchers concluded that not only did spinach not supply the needed calcium (because of the oxalate), but the spinach also rendered the calcium from other foods unavailable. What we know now is that oxalate is a mineral chelator – and rather than delivering minerals, it was robbing them from the rats.
    Getting Your Vitamin K
    Vitamin K is a very important nutrient. Life Extension indicates that new research from 2014 links vitamin K to longevity. In fact, the highest intakes of vitamin K reduced the likelihood of dying from any cause by 36%! So, you definitely want to get vitamin K in your diet.
    However, most of us think that we need to eat high oxalate greens – like spinach – in order to get good amounts of vitamin K. Nothing could be further from the truth! Kale, collards and turnip greens are all higher in vitamin K than spinach, and they have a fraction of the oxalate.

    Tina Turbin
    Celiac.com 06/07/2016 - Where are all my Mexican food lovers? This one is especially for you. These Mexican stuffed zucchini boats are a perfect gluten-free party dish. You can cut them up into smaller pieces and serve them as a tray snack that is nutritious and protein packed. I don't know about you but I love when I go to a party and there are plates of healthy items to snack on. I never feel good filling up on just potato chips and veggie sticks. Junk food makes you feel pretty junky.
    I really enjoy hosting get togethers at my house. Since I am a mom of three "kids" and am a grandmother as well, I tend to have a full house and like to make healthy gluten-free and sugar-free snacks and meals for my friends and family. No matter how old your kids get, they still always love coming over for a homemade meal. My youngest son is a mexican food "junkie" and really likes this recipe even though it is grain-free as well. He doesn't mind at all giving up the corn tacos. You can change the heat level to whatever you desire too. As always, my recipes are for you to enjoy and alter for whatever suits your taste and likes.
    Ingredients:
    4 large organic green zucchinis ½ pound ground free-range turkey, chicken or grass-fed beef 4 slices Canadian bacon ½ small white onion, chopped fine ½ cup Salsa Verde (no preservatives) 1-1/4 cup chopped cilantro 3 tablespoons coconut oil or olive oil 1-2 tablespoons chili powder 1 tablespoon tabasco sauce (or to taste) 1 teaspoon salt or to taste 1 teaspoon pepper or to taste Optional: Grass-fed cheese Directions:
    1. Preheat the oven to 400F.
    2. Cut each zucchini lengthwise down the middle, to make 2 halves from each.
    3. Take an apple corer and remove the inside, but be careful not to cut into the dark green. Leave about â…› inch on sides and bottom. This will be your "boat".
    4. Take the zucchini pulp and chop semi fine.
    5. Heat 1 tablespoon oil on medium until hot.
    6. Add the onion and cook until semi-glossy then add the zucchini pulp and saute for 1 minute. You may add some tabasco at this point if you like spicy or hot.
    7. Transfer to a deep bowl.
    8. Add 1 tablespoon of oil to the same pan and heat oil on medium.
    9. Add ground meat and cook until done.
    10. Add to bowl with onions and zucchini.
    11. Drain all but 1 tablespoon of the juices and oils and sauté Canadian bacon in same pan until slightly browned.
    12. Remove bacon to cutting board - slice into small slices.
    13. Add to same bowl.
    14. Add Salsa Verde, cilantro, chili powder, Tabasco and salt and pepper to taste.
    15. You may add shredded cheese at this point if you desire.
    16. Mix all ingredients.
    17. Stuff the boats with the mixture and pile them nice and high, then stack them close to one another in a baking dish so they stand upright.
    18. Cover with tin foil.
    19. Bake for 30 minutes.
    20. Remove and let sit still while covered for 5 minutes.
    21. If you have extra meat mixture, you may heat the leftover meat as well in the oven.
    22. You may serve a little extra protein on the side of each boat with a garnish of cilantro and a touch of hot sauce.
    23. Enjoy!

    Tina Turbin
    Celiac.com 06/23/2016 - This is a very versatile gluten-free recipe. This paleo and gluten-free brownie pie crust can be made into a crust or simply eaten as gluten-free cookies. It is also totally OK to consume it raw since it is made out of all vegan ingredients. Based on the feedback I've received, it tastes delicious when prepared raw.
    This crust/cookie recipe is a wonderful base to build upon. I create a lot of raw cheesecakes with the crust and any leftovers are made into little cookies for later. The chocolate flavor in this is quite light so it won't overpower the other flavors you may want to work in with it.
    The only piece of machinery required is a food processor and this healthy recipe comes together easily. Nuts are the real star of this recipe though. I purchase nuts in bulk since I use them for homemade nut milk as well as many baked items and as an on-the-go snack. Certain nuts offer a variety of health benefits you would have never even thought of. Almonds for example, which are used in this recipe, rank highest out of all tree nuts in protein, fiber, calcium and vitamin E. Enjoy!
    Ingredients:
    2 cups almonds 1 cup pecans or walnuts 1 ½ cups dates, chopped ¼ cup 100% cacao powder 2 teaspoons vanilla extract ¼ teaspoon salt 2-4 teaspoons water Directions:
    Preheat oven to 325F degrees. Place almonds in food processor and grind until somewhat fine. Add pecans or walnuts and grind until somewhat fine. Add the remaining ingredients excluding water. Pulse in the food processor. Add water until mixture isn't flaky, just until dough holds slightly together. Line a 9” spring form pan with waxed paper. Add dough mixture to the pan and spread over the top of the paper. If you are doing crust up the sides of the pan, you will need to line the sides of the pan as well. Press firmly. Bake for 15-17 minutes. OPTIONAL: do not bake if you are on a raw diet. Enjoy!  

    Tina Turbin
    Celiac.com 07/05/2016 - This is hands down one of the easiest and most loved weekend recipes I whip up. Healthy, protein packed, sugar-free, gluten-free, paleo and satisfying. When I have the entire family over they always request this easy sausage and peppers recipe. It works for brunch, lunch or even dinner. I must warn you though, this will go fast. Make plenty of extra so you have leftovers as this gluten-free recipe is delicious heated back up.
    If I have everyone over for brunch I will usually make a homemade frittata to go with this or some sweet potato breakfast potatoes. Even my two Maltese pups go crazy over the aroma that emanates from my kitchen. They are always predictably there under my feet just in case "something" happens to drop.
    You can make this ahead of time, then heat it up in an oven safe dish too so you are not so rushed on the day of your get together.
    Enjoy!
    Ingredients:
    1 orange pepper 2 yellow peppers 2-3 packages of sausages (12-18 ounce packages) 2-4 tablespoons Olive oil Note: Green peppers are okay to use as well. Directions:
    Slice sausage 2-3 inches in thickness, diagonal cut is fine. Clean and then cut the peppers. Cut into 1-2 inch pieces. Heat large skillet with olive oil. Add sausage 2 cups at a time so as not to crowd. Stir now and then until they appear a tad bit charred. Add more oil only as necessary. Remove and do this with all of the sausage. Set all aside on paper towels to drain and pat with paper towel lightly. Add peppers to the same oil until they start to soften. Place all in a large, heat-proof skillet. Cover with tin foil. Place in oven for 30 minutes. Remove and serve. Enjoy! NOTE: can be served as a protein side to main dish; excellent for BBQ type meals and sit-down dinners.
    NOTE: Can be prepared days in advance. If so, place in fridge covered. Remove about 5 hours before eating time. Place in preheated oven at 350F for 40 minutes.
     

    Jim Swayze
    Celiac.com 09/08/2017 - For for the overwhelming majority of our time here on this planet we've all followed a paleo, or hunter-gatherer, diet. This is not a way of eating invented by the latest Hollywood guru – though truth be told there are now plenty of stars who eat this way. It's common sense, really, if you're able to unlearn a good portion of the dietary wisdom we've been force-fed over the last generation or two.
    Paleo means little more than, in the words of Ray Audette, what you could find to eat if you were "naked with a sharp stick.” And the foods you'd find would have to be, at least in theory (though usually not in practice), edible raw. So what foods would have been available to our ancestors?
    Meat, for sure. There are no known hunter gatherer populations who were vegetarian/vegan. Animal protein is vital to human health. Why then do we hear about healthy vegetarian diets? Because they are healthy as compared to the modern Western diet, with its ubiquitous high fructose corn syrup, artificial fats and sweeteners, and high-glycemic carbohydrates.
    Ok, so animal protein. What else could have been found by our ancestral hunter-gatherers? Fruit and true vegetables, in season.
    That's basically it: meat, fruit, vegetables. And of course, plenty of good, cold water.
    What did we not eat then? Grains in any form, gluten-free or not. Legumes, which are extremely toxic raw and have to be soaked and cooked in order to be edible. (Hint: peanuts are legumes!) New world foods like chocolate, coffee. The list goes on and you should have the hang of it by now. Again, the standard: foods edible raw that would have been available to our ancestors.
    Question: Would dairy have been available to our ancestors? The answer is clearly no, other than in the form of human breastmilk for the first few months or years of life. Bovine milk, meant for calf populations, is not a natural human food.
    Sound overly restrictive? Let me tell you today's menu: For breakfast, three eggs over easy with bacon and a glass of fresh-squeezed orange juice. Lunch was tuna on romaine lettuce with sliced almonds and a vinaigrette with iced green tea to drink. And dinner, a mere five minutes away, is grassfed flank steak lettuce-wrap tacos with roasted hatch green chile guacamole. And a nice glass of New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc.
    Give paleo a try. It's the ultimate gluten-free way of eating.

  • Recent Articles

    Christina Kantzavelos
    Celiac.com 07/20/2018 - During my Vipassana retreat, I wasn’t left with much to eat during breakfast, at least in terms of gluten free options. Even with gluten free bread, the toasters weren’t separated to prevent cross contamination. All of my other options were full of sugar (cereals, fruits), which I try to avoid, especially for breakfast. I had to come up with something that did not have sugar, was tasty, salty, and gave me some form of protein. After about four days of mixing and matching, I was finally able to come up with the strangest concoction, that may not look the prettiest, but sure tastes delicious. Actually, if you squint your eyes just enough, it tastes like buttery popcorn. I now can’t stop eating it as a snack at home, and would like to share it with others who are looking for a yummy nutritious snack. 
    Ingredients:
    4 Rice cakes ⅓ cup of Olive oil  Mineral salt ½ cup Nutritional Yeast ⅓ cup of Sunflower Seeds  Intriguing list, right?...
    Directions (1.5 Servings):
    Crunch up the rice into small bite size pieces.  Throw a liberal amount of nutritional yeast onto the pieces, until you see more yellow than white.  Add salt to taste. For my POTS brothers and sisters, throw it on (we need an excess amount of salt to maintain a healthy BP).  Add olive oil  Liberally sprinkle sunflower seeds. This is what adds the protein and crunch, so the more, the tastier.  Buen Provecho, y Buen Camino! 

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/19/2018 - Maintaining a gluten-free diet can be an on-going challenge, especially when you factor in all the hidden or obscure gluten that can trip you up. In many cases, foods that are naturally gluten-free end up contain added gluten. Sometimes this can slip by us, and that when the suffering begins. To avoid suffering needlessly, be sure to keep a sharp eye on labels, and beware of added or hidden gluten, even in food labeled gluten-free.  Use Celiac.com's SAFE Gluten-Free Food List and UNSAFE Gluten-free Food List as a guide.
    Also, beware of these common mistakes that can ruin your gluten-free diet. Watch out for:
    Watch out for naturally gluten-free foods like rice and soy, that use gluten-based ingredients in processing. For example, many rice and soy beverages are made using barley enzymes, which can cause immune reactions in people with celiac disease. Be careful of bad advice from food store employees, who may be misinformed themselves. For example, many folks mistakenly believe that wheat-based grains like spelt or kamut are safe for celiacs. Be careful when taking advice. Beware of cross-contamination between food store bins selling raw flours and grains, often via the food scoops. Be careful to avoid wheat-bread crumbs in butter, jams, toaster, counter surface, etc. Watch out for hidden gluten in prescription drugs. Ask your pharmacist for help about anything you’re not sure about, or suspect might contain unwanted gluten. Watch out for hidden gluten in lotions, conditioners, shampoos, deodorants, creams and cosmetics, (primarily for those with dermatitis herpetaformis). Be mindful of stamps, envelopes or other gummed labels, as these can often contain wheat paste. Use a sponge to moisten such surfaces. Be careful about hidden gluten in toothpaste and mouthwash. Be careful about common cereal ingredients, such as malt flavoring, or other non-gluten-free ingredient. Be extra careful when considering packaged mixes and sauces, including soy sauce, fish sauce, catsup, mustard, mayonnaise, etc., as many of these can contain wheat or wheat by-product in their manufacture. Be especially careful about gravy mixes, packets & canned soups. Even some brands of rice paper can contain gluten, so be careful. Lastly, watch out for foods like ice cream and yogurt, which are often gluten-free, but can also often contain added ingredients that can make them unsuitable for anyone on a gluten-free diet. Eating Out? If you eat out, consider that many restaurants use a shared grill or shared cooking oil for regular and gluten-free foods, so be careful. Also, watch for flour in otherwise gluten-free spices, as per above. Ask questions, and stay vigilant.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/18/2018 - Despite many studies on immune development in children, there still isn’t much good data on how a mother’s diet during pregnancy and infancy influences a child’s immune development.  A team of researchers recently set out to assess whether changes in maternal or infant diet might influence the risk of allergies or autoimmune disease.
    The team included Vanessa Garcia-Larsen, Despo Ierodiakonou, Katharine Jarrold, Sergio Cunha,  Jennifer Chivinge, Zoe Robinson, Natalie Geoghegan, Alisha Ruparelia, Pooja Devani, Marialena Trivella, Jo Leonardi-Bee, and Robert J. Boyle.
    They are variously associated with the Department of Undiagnosed Celiac Disease More Common in Women and Girls International Health, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, United States of America; the Respiratory Epidemiology, Occupational Medicine and Public Health, National Heart and Lung Institute, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; the Section of Paediatrics, Department of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; the Centre for Statistics in Medicine, University of Oxford, Oxford, United Kingdom; the Division of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom; the Centre of Evidence Based Dermatology, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom; and Stanford University in the USA.
    Team members searched MEDLINE, Excerpta Medica dataBASE (EMBASE), Web of Science, Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and Literatura Latino Americana em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS) for observational studies conducted between January 1946 and July 2013, and interventional studies conducted through December 2017, that evaluated the relationship between diet during pregnancy, lactation, or the first year of life, and future risk of allergic or autoimmune disease. 
    They then selected studies, extracted data, and assessed bias risk. They evaluated data using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE). They found 260 original studies, covering 964,143 participants, of milk feeding, including 1 intervention trial of breastfeeding promotion, and 173 original studies, covering 542,672 participants, of other maternal or infant dietary exposures, including 80 trials of 26 maternal, 32 infant, or 22 combined interventions. 
    They found a high bias risk in nearly half of the more than 250 milk feeding studies and in about one-quarter of studies of other dietary exposures. Evidence from 19 intervention trials suggests that oral supplementation with probiotics during late pregnancy and lactation may reduce risk of eczema. 44 cases per 1,000; 95% CI 20–64), and 6 trials, suggest that fish oil supplementation during pregnancy and lactation may reduce risk of allergic sensitization to egg. GRADE certainty of these findings was moderate. 
    The team found less evidence, and low GRADE certainty, for claims that breastfeeding reduces eczema risk during infancy, that longer exclusive breastfeeding is associated with reduced type 1 diabetes mellitus, and that probiotics reduce risk of infants developing allergies to cow’s milk. 
    They found no evidence that dietary exposure to other factors, including prebiotic supplements, maternal allergenic food avoidance, and vitamin, mineral, fruit, and vegetable intake, influence risk of allergic or autoimmune disease. 
    Overall, the team’s findings support a connection between the mother’s diet and risk of immune-mediated diseases in the child. Maternal probiotic and fish oil supplementation may reduce risk of eczema and allergic sensitization to food, respectively.
    Stay tuned for more on diet during pregnancy and its role in celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS Med. 2018 Feb; 15(2): e1002507. doi:  10.1371/journal.pmed.1002507

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/17/2018 - What can fat soluble vitamin levels in newly diagnosed children tell us about celiac disease? A team of researchers recently assessed fat soluble vitamin levels in children diagnosed with newly celiac disease to determine whether vitamin levels needed to be assessed routinely in these patients during diagnosis.
    The researchers evaluated the symptoms of celiac patients in a newly diagnosed pediatric group and evaluated their fat soluble vitamin levels and intestinal biopsies, and then compared their vitamin levels with those of a healthy control group.
    The research team included Yavuz Tokgöz, Semiha Terlemez and Aslıhan Karul. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, the Department of Pediatrics, and the Department of Biochemistry at Adnan Menderes University Medical Faculty in Aydın, Turkey.
    The team evaluated 27 female, 25 male celiac patients, and an evenly divided group of 50 healthy control subjects. Patients averaged 9 years, and weighed 16.2 kg. The most common symptom in celiac patients was growth retardation, which was seen in 61.5%, with  abdominal pain next at 51.9%, and diarrhea, seen in 11.5%. Histological examination showed nearly half of the patients at grade Marsh 3B. 
    Vitamin A and vitamin D levels for celiac patients were significantly lower than the control group. Vitamin A and vitamin D deficiencies were significantly more common compared to healthy subjects. Nearly all of the celiac patients showed vitamin D insufficiency, while nearly 62% showed vitamin D deficiency. Nearly 33% of celiac patients showed vitamin A deficiency. 
    The team saw no deficiencies in vitamin E or vitamin K1 among celiac patients. In the healthy control group, vitamin D deficiency was seen in 2 (4%) patients, vitamin D insufficiency was determined in 9 (18%) patients. The team found normal levels of all other vitamins in the healthy group.
    Children with newly diagnosed celiac disease showed significantly reduced levels of vitamin D and A. The team recommends screening of vitamin A and D levels during diagnosis of these patients.
    Source:
    BMC Pediatrics

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/16/2018 - Did weak public oversight leave Arizonans ripe for Theranos’ faulty blood tests scam? Scandal-plagued blood-testing company Theranos deceived Arizona officials and patients by selling unproven, unreliable products that produced faulty medical results, according to a new book by Wall Street Journal reporter, whose in-depth, comprehensive investigation of the company uncovered deceit, abuse, and potential fraud.
    Moreover, Arizona government officials facilitated the deception by providing weak regulatory oversight that essentially left patients as guinea pigs, said the book’s author, investigative reporter John Carreyrou. 
    In the newly released "Bad Blood: Secrets and Lies in a Silicon Valley Startup," Carreyrou documents how Theranos and its upstart founder, Elizabeth Holmes, used overblown marketing claims and questionable sales tactics to push faulty products that resulted in consistently faulty blood tests results. Flawed results included tests for celiac disease and numerous other serious, and potentially life-threatening, conditions.
    According to Carreyrou, Theranos’ lies and deceit made Arizonans into guinea pigs in what amounted to a "big, unauthorized medical experiment.” Even though founder Elizabeth Holmes and Theranos duped numerous people, including seemingly savvy investors, Carreyrou points out that there were public facts available to elected officials back then, like a complete lack of clinical data on the company's testing and no approvals from the Food and Drug Administration for any of its tests.
    SEC recently charged the now disgraced Holmes with what it called a 'years-long fraud.’ The company’s value has plummeted, and it is now nearly worthless, and facing dozens, and possibly hundreds of lawsuits from angry investors. Meantime, Theranos will pay Arizona consumers $4.65 million under a consumer-fraud settlement Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich negotiated with the embattled blood-testing company.
    Both investors and Arizona officials, “could have picked up on those things or asked more questions or kicked the tires more," Carreyrou said. Unlike other states, such as New York, Arizona lacks robust laboratory oversight that would likely have prevented Theranos from operating in those places, he added.
    Stay tuned for more new on how the Theranos fraud story plays out.
    Read more at azcentral.com.