• Join our community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsSubscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

  • Member Statistics

    72,123
    Total Members
    3,093
    Most Online
    Cheryl W
    Newest Member
    Cheryl W
    Joined
  • Announcements

    • admin

      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/07/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
  • 0

    GLUTEN-FREE SAFETY STARTS HERE


    Sarah  Curcio


    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2016 Issue - Originally published April 14, 2016


    Celiac.com 05/24/2016 - How many of us have suffered from cross contamination? Most celiacs have felt the side effects of getting gluten in their food. If it is not your own kitchen, utensils, pots or pans it can be a bit nerve racking. It is not only extremely unpleasant, but unhealthy to our intestines as well. It can cause damage that can be very detrimental in the long run.


    Ads by Google:




    ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW ADS
    Ads by Google:



    Photo: CC--Joe LewlsThis is exactly why the gluten-free label is particularly important. This gives celiacs a sense of safety, like a security blanket. However, how is that labeling decided upon? What certifications are really used? What standards are considered to ensure that it is 20 parts per million (ppm) or even less? Just think about the danger that can occur if something has to be recalled. For example, let's take a look at General Mills Cheerios versus Udi's Gluten-Free Foods.

    Now, Udi's is certified by the Gluten Free Certification Organization (GFCO), which is an industry program of the Gluten Intolerance Group (GIG.) Whereas Cheerios, takes the oats, used to make the cereal, and puts it through a proprietary, mechanical system. This is supposed to remove any cross-contamination from wheat, barley or rye, according to General Mills. How safe is this for individuals with celiac disease? This is why standards are very vital.

    Now, the GFCO requires that all finished products' ingredients, using their logo, contain 10ppm or even less of gluten. It requires a stringent review process, in order to gain approval. Plus, barley-based ingredients are absolutely not allowed, under any circumstances.

    Then, you look at Cheerios and the differences are as plain as day. Recently, there was a major recall of 1.8 million boxes due to an error where a gluten ingredient was accidentally added. General Mills issued a recall of some Original Cheerios and Honey Nut Cheerios cereal because some boxes were labeled as gluten-free but actually contained wheat.

    This is absolutely not safe for the celiac community. This improper labeling can be dangerous and there are no certifications or review processes like the GFCO. The thought of becoming ill from the cross-contamination is not on any celiac's to do list. Having certified oats versus regular oats is safer that simply having the wheat washed out. The oat fields are way too close to the wheat fields.

    In the end, which would you rather purchase? There is Certified Gluten Free Foods versus just gluten-free foods. Think about your villi because they really should be up and not down!

    References:

    1. Udi's Gluten Free - FAQs. Retrieved from: http://udisglutenfree.com/faq/
    2. Gluten Intolerance Group - The Gluten-Free Certification Organization. Retrieved from http://www.gfco.org/
    3. CNBC - General Mills recalls 1.8M Cheerios boxes for allergens. Retrieved from http://www.glutenfreeliving.com/gluten-free-foods/diet/gluten-free-cheerios/
    4. Gluten Free Living - Gluten-Free Cheerios. Retrieved from http://www.cnbc.com/2015/10/05/general-mills-recalls-cheerios-for-allergen-issue.html

    Image Caption: Photo: CC--Joe Lewls
    0


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There are no comments to display.



    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoticons maximum are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Popular Contributors

  • Ads by Google:

  • Who's Online   16 Members, 1 Anonymous, 1,236 Guests (See full list)

  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/26/2016 - Consumer complaints to the FDA fueled a class action lawsuit claiming that cereal maker General Mills mislabeled gluten contaminated Cheerios as "gluten-free."
    The recent suit was brought by a Kentucky woman, who alleges that she purchased two boxes of Honey Nut Cheerios labeled as gluten-free, but which actually contained gluten levels more than two times higher than allowed under FDA standards.
    The consumer complaints led to FDA testing on gluten-free Cheerios. The FDA tested 36 samples of gluten-free Cheerios taken from different manufacturing facilities and lots. The tests found that some "Gluten Free" Cheerios samples contained as much as 43 ppm gluten. Current FDA rules forbid the use of the statement "gluten-free" on any food product with gluten levels above 20 parts per million.
    General Mills issued a recall on Oct. 5., and the suit was filed in late 2015 in a California federal court, and charges violations of California and Kentucky consumer protection laws.
    The suit alleges that supposedly gluten-free oats were cross contaminated with ordinary wheat at one of General Mills' processing facilities.
    Stay tuned for more news on this and other developments on gluten-free labeling and celiac disability claims.
    Read more at Legalnewsline.com.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/18/2016 - An Australian man's fight to force his local pub to provide gluten-free gravy to go with his gluten-free New Year meal made it all the way to that country's Federal Circuit Court, before a judge brought the man's quest to an ignoble end by pronouncing the suit "frivolous," and dismissing it entirely.
    The man in the center of the battle is Bruce Skeen, an elderly gentleman with celiac disease or gluten intolerance. Mr. Skeen's travails began when he paid $1 to attend Christmas function at Blacktown Workers Club in December 2013.
    For the Christmas function, Skeen pre-ordered a gluten-free meal and gluten-free dessert, despite never having done so in the past. When his gluten-free roast dinner arrived without gluten-free gravy, Mr. Skeen became "angry and disruptive."
    One week later, Mr Skeen returned to the club, where he became "physically and verbally aggressive" towards staff as he placed another order for a gluten-free meal and demanded gluten-free gravy be served at the upcoming New Year's Eve function. When he did not receive his gluten-free gravy he had demanded, he later sued the club for discrimination.
    Skeen's suit was dismissed as frivolous by the Federal Circuit Court in Sydney last month. Suing establishments for discrimination over failure to provide gluten-free foods seems to be on the rise lately, and not just in America. 
    What do you think? Is Mr. Skeen helping the cause of celiacs, or is he perhaps doing more harm than good?
    Source:
    SMH.com.au  

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/28/2016 - An Oregon man who claims to have celiac disease filed another proposed class action suit against General Mills in federal court recently.
    The company recalled nearly 2 million boxes of the cereal last year after what they claimed was a mistake at a local packaging plant. That recall incident has spurred several lawsuits already, which were covered in two previous articles, General Mills Sued Over Recalled Gluten-free Cheerios, and General Mills Sued Again, This Time for Misleading Labels on Gluten-free Cheerios.
    In the latest suit, named plaintiff, Christopher Hamilton, of Marion County, Oregon, individually and for all others similarly situated, filed a class action lawsuit Feb. 29 in U.S. District Court for the District of Oregon Eugene Division against General Mills Inc. and General Mills Sales Inc., alleging violations of the Oregon Unlawful Trade Practices Act and consumer protection statutes in several states.
    Hamilton's suit alleges that General Mills wrongly labels some of its Cheerios as "gluten free.” He claims he purchased a $15.98 twin pack of “gluten-free” original and honey nut-flavored varieties of Cheerios in late September from a Salem Costco that was later subject to recall.
    The complaint states that a test sample of the purportedly gluten-free Cheerios contained 43 parts per million of gluten, which exceeds the 20 parts per million federal limit for a food product to be labeled as gluten free.
    Source:
    Legalnewsline.com

    Betty Wedman-St Louis, PhD, RD
    Celiac.com 07/18/2016 - Dietary phosphorus occurs naturally in dairy foods, animal meats, and legumes but according to the Institute of Medicine, high levels of phosphorus can be a contributor to cardiovascular, kidney and osteoporosis disorders.
    While phosphorus is considered an essential nutrient, the increased amounts found in processed foods via additives like anti-caking agents, stabilizers and leavening agents or acidifiers does not have to be stated on the nutrition label. Individuals following a gluten-free diet need to consider the health implications of phosphates found in processed foods eaten regularly in their diet. Reducing carbonated beverages is the best way to reduce phosphorus levels in the diet. Extra attention needs to be paid to the ingredient statement on foods.
    Ingredient statements may include these declarations: tri-calcium phosphate, tri-magnesium phosphate, disodium phosphate, di-potassium phosphate. Just because the label states "natural" or "organic" does not mean it is a healthy food for daily consumption. Fresh is best!
    Here is a guide to where phosphates can be found in gluten-free processed foods:
    Baked goods- cake mixes, donuts, refrigerated dough (pyrophosphates are used for leavening and as a dough "improver") Beverages- phosphoric acid in colas (acidulant), pyrophosphate in chocolate milk to suspend cocoa, pyrophosphate in buttermilk for protein dispersion, tri-calcium phosphate in orange juice for fortification, tetra-sodium phosphate in strawberry flavored milk to bind iron to pink color Cereals- phosphate in dry cereals to aid flow through extruder, fortification of vitamins Cheese- phosphoric acid in cottage cheese to set acidification, phosphate in dips, sauces, cheese slices and baked chips for emulsifying action and surface agent Imitation Dairy Products (non-dairy products)- phosphate as buffer for smooth mixing into coffee and as anti-caking agent for dry powders Egg Products- phosphate for stability and color + foam improvement Ice Cream- pyrophosphate to prevent gritty texture Meat Products- tri-phosphate for injections into ham, corned beef, sausage, franks, bologna, roast beef for moisture Nutrition Bars & Meal Replacement Drinks- phosphates for fortification and microbiological stability Potatoes- phosphate in baked potato chips to create bubbles on the surface, pyrophosphate in French fries, hash browns, potato flakes to inhibit iron induced blackening Poultry- tri-phosphate for moisture and removal of salmonella and campylobacter pathogens Pudding & Cheesecakes- phosphate to develop thickened texture Seafood- tri-phosphate in shrimp for mechanical peeling, pyrophosphate in canned tuna and crab to stabilize color and crystals, surimi (crab/sea sticks) tri-phosphate and pyrophosphate as cryoprotectant to protein {surimi contains gluten and is not recommended for gluten-free diets] Hyperphosphate levels can contribute to muscle aches, calcification of coronary arteries and skeletal issues. Many food companies do not provide phosphorus analysis information because it is not required on the label but here is a representative sample of phosphorus levels in some commonly consumed on a gluten-free diet.
    Peanuts (1 ounce) 150 mg
    Yogurt (1 cup) 300 mg
    M&M Peanuts (1.74 oz pkg) 93 mg
    Rice Krispies Cereal (1 cup) 200 mg
    Dietary recommendations for an adult for Phosphorus is 800 to 1000 mg.

    Yvonne (Vonnie) Mostat
    Celiac.com 08/04/2016 - Did, or do you know the hidden dangers of celiac disease? Often we can spout off some of the things we have been told, heard or learned on this gluten free journey, but do you know the hidden dangers of unchecked or ignored celiac disease or gluten sensitivity? I myself was shocked by some of the research that is out there about the damage of consuming gluten. Some people who are diagnosed quickly are able to reverse the certain hidden and unknown problems.
    Did You Know that Medical facts listed by the Canadian Celiac Association in their Medical Facts bulletin of 2016 indicate that celiac disease now affects between 0.5% - 1% of the population of the USA, which is similar to the prevalence reported in Europe? World prevalence is estimated at 1 in 166, and celiac disease is now recognized as one of the most common inherited diseases. Did you know that it is the "untreated", (non-compliance to the strict adherence to the gluten-free diet) that can cause so many symptoms other than the gastrointestinal symptoms and villus atrophy that occurs in the majority of cases?
    Let's start out with the basic information that this is a genetically-based autoimmune disorder in which specific peptides from wheat, rye and barley (commonly referred to as "gluten") trigger progressive destruction of the villi of the small intestine. Gluten consumption can result in deficiencies of iron, folate, calcium and the fat-soluble vitamins (A,D,E & K) and an increased risk of osteoporosis, infertility and specific cancers of the gut.
    Did you know that the celiac has an increased risk of osteoporosis, infertility and specific cancers of the gut? This information is not intended to scare you with threats of the "BIG C", we all have enough fear of cancer, but it is intended to wake us all up to the complications of untreated celiac disease. The National Institute of Health warns of the following complications of celiac disease in patients who DO NOT follow the gluten-free diet. These problems can usually be blamed for the "symptoms of celiac disease" that are present when the patient is first diagnosed. In many cases, these complications can improve or go away completely if a gluten-free diet is STRICTLY followed. Sadly, there are still celiac patients who ignore the fact that this is a lifetime problem which as yet does not have a cure, despite false advertising to that effect (I was recently approached by someone who eagerly sells certain vitamins that guarantee they can rid me of not only celiac disease, but dermatitis herpetiformis (DH)--this person was involved in a multi-level marketing program that is inundating our local community, specifically approaching women who want to make additional income by selling this pre-packaged set of vitamins that come from Australia that are "guaranteed" to heal my autoimmune disorder).
    Did you know that malnutrition is fairly common even when patients are eating lots of healthy foods? They can become malnourished because the nutrients in the food are not being absorbed. These so-called vitamins that guarantee to heal celiac disease are not the answer, and a strict adherence to the gluten-free diet is the only answer.
    Vitamins and nutrients are excreted in the stool. Malnutrition caused by untreated celiac can cause weight loss, anaemia, and vitamin deficiencies that may result in fatigue, stunted growth, neurological problems, and low bone density. Science truly is sounding the alarm with regards to brain function and celiac disease, and new studies about what happens when gluten particles get into the brain of someone with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity are mind boggling.
    Did you know that decreased calcium levels and osteoporosis, specifically calcium and vitamin D (which are lost in the stool instead of being absorbed into the body) are leading to rickets in children, a type of kidney stone called an oxalate stone, as well as osteomalacia (softening of the bone), osteopenia and osteoporosis? Those of you who have been diagnosed as having gluten sensitivity are not left out because bone diseases can occur in people with milder forms who do not appear to have malabsorption. In such people bone density can actually improve once the gluten-free diet is started.
    Did you know that many celiac patients on the gluten-free diet find that once their intestines have healed, lactase (which helps us digest the lactose in dairy products and is produced in the cells that line the surface of the villi in the small intestine) production
    The cancer concern, according to most studies, is most prevalent in long-standing UNTREATED celiac disease. Gastrointestinal cancer, such as lymphoma, even with this increased risk, is still noted as relatively rare according to Nancy Lepid, celiac disease and gluten sensitivity Expert. Yet people with celiac disease may have a near two-fold increased risk of coronary artery disease compared with the general population, according to research to be presented at the American College of Cardiology's 63rd Annual Scientific Session. This study is the first to look at the association between celiac disease and coronary artery disease and adds to the evolving understanding of how systemic inflammation and autoimmune processes might influence cardiovascular disease development. Data also showed a slightly higher risk of stroke among people with celiac disease compared to controls. Time and time again it is repeated that celiac disease is a chronic inflammatory condition of the digestive system that can damage the small intestine, eventually interfering with the absorption of key nutrients. People with celiac disease are unable to tolerate gluten because gluten is thought to trigger an immune and inflammatory response in the gut.
    Did you know that researchers found a significantly higher prevalence of coronary artery disease among patients with celiac disease compared to the control population (90.5 percent compared to 5.6 percent, respectively)? Data showed a similar trend among younger patients those under age 65, (WOW!) That is younger!?!) Compared to those without celiac disease (4.5 percent compared to 2.4 percent). This is an important study because it highlights a specific patient population who might be at higher risk for coronary artery disease, even in the absence of traditional cardiovascular risk factors, according to R.D. Gajulapelli, M.D. , clinical associate at the Cleveland Clinic and co-investigator of the study. "Our findings reinforce the idea that chronic inflammation, whether it's from an infection or a disease, can have an adverse role in coronary artery disease and heart health in general."
    I was urged to have bowel scopes every five years when I was diagnosed with celiac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis, but I was never informed of the increased risk of coronary artery disease, or that people with celiac disease were slightly more likely to have high cholesterol. Dr. Gajulapelli himself said: "We were surprised by the strength of the association of the high prevalence of coronary artery disease, "Especially" in younger people. Patients and doctors should be aware of this association. If celiac disease affects an estimated 1 in 133 Americans, but experts believe upwards of 80 percent of people with celiac disease are under-diagnosed or misdiagnosed with conditions such as lactose intolerance and irritable bowel (often called the "Catch-all" diagnoses when a physician does not know what is wrong with a patient). Previous research shows celiac disease has been on the rise and is four times more common now than it was 50 years ago. The only treatment for celiac disease is adopting a gluten-free diet.
    So you believe that these rapidly growing numbers are directly related to earlier or better diagnosis, or the education of physicians today? I prefer to believe that it is the better education of the family physician with regard to the signs of celiac disease.
    To close I wanted to surprise you with some statistics with regards to the sales of gluten-free products, which in 2010 reached $2.6 billion, and were expected to exceed more than $5 billion in 2015. This year, with the increase in prepackaged gluten-free foods and the marketing restaurant guidelines one could estimate that it will be well over $15 billion. Celiac patients used to have to prepare everything from scratch, but we are quickly buying into the boxed fast-food "celiac generation".

    Yvonne (Vonnie) Mostat
    Celiac.com 10/25/2016 - The 504 Plan stems from Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. This section prevents discrimination against public school students in grades kindergarten through 12 because of disabilities. A 504 plan is meant to "remove barriers" to learning by providing a specific outline on how to make accommodations or modifications on a student-by-student basis.
    The Rehabilitation Act of 1973 applies to all institutions receiving federal financial assistance, such as public schools. Under this law, public schools must provide a free, appropriate public education and not discriminate against disabled students. This law acknowledges that the disability may not require special education services, but a plan is needed to ensure the student receives an appropriate education accommodating the disability within the classroom. This law must accommodate a special diet, including the gluten-free diet for children with celiac disease.
    The decision to enroll in the 504 plan is entirely up to you as a parent or guardian. Some parents find that informal discussions and accommodations have been sufficient for having the child's needs met at school. However, having a formal 504 plan in place is valuable, especially as teachers and staffing may change. The 504 plan guarantees by law that your child's needs are met throughout their school career and not just in certain classrooms. You can choose to utilize your 504 plan accommodations any time, and having them in place before you need them can save important time and resources. It can be helpful if your child develops symptoms from gluten exposure, or if you are having trouble with consistent accountability.
    How to Start Your 504 Plan
    First you need to contact your child's school. The 504 plan team should include: Primary classroom teacher School counselor or psychologist School nurse Director of food services 504 plan coordinator You will also need a doctor's note to show that your child has been formally diagnosed with celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity (gluten sensitivity). This note should outline the accommodations required to maintain your child's health, enabling him or her to have equal access to public education. Having a 504 plan in place will also make it much easier to apply for disability accommodation in college.
    What Information is Included in a 504 Plan?
    Generally you'll need to provide information about your child's diagnosis and needs including:
    Year of diagnosis Amount of time on a gluten-free diet Details on why a 504 plan is needed (including how a restricted diet affects a major life activity) Child's developmental level and needs (are they self-reliant in managing the diet? do they need strict supervision? Etc.) A 504 PLAN will specifically outline all of the details of how our child's celiac disease needs to be managed in the classroom. For example you and the 503 plan team can develop an action plan for:
    Navigating school lunches Snacks Birthday Parties Art Classes Field Trips Holiday Parties I wish that this 504 Plan was available when my son attended school! Do not forget to check your school's ruling on peanut butter. A lot of schools will not allow lunches to contain peanut butter because of severe peanut allergies, and we need to be respectful of other food allergies as we sort through the maze of gluten-free lunch packing.
    If you have a picky eater or a child who needs to gain weight after their diagnosis, nutritional shakes, power bars and calorie powders can pack a punch. Make sure they are labeled gluten-free. Consult with a registered dietitian to help with your child's meal plan. When you find a winning combo, send enough with your child to share. That will show your child's peers that gluten-free food is not "weird" and your child will have the opportunity to feel part of the group.
    Recently, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) mandated that food service workers who manage and handle meals would need to complete education and training requirements in order to maintain their positions. The requirement to maintain professional standards education, which is required by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act, went into effect on July 1, 2015. Completion of the GREAT Schools program helps school nutrition professionals meet this requirement. You can remind your child's school that completing the GREAT Schools training program does benefit both your child and the cafeteria staff in maintaining the necessary education to work in school food service
    Additional Resources:
    BeyondCeliac.org allergicliving.com Understood.org

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/23/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to learn whether celiac disease patients commonly suffer cognitive impairment at the time they are diagnosed, and to compare their cognitive performance with non-celiac subjects with similar chronic symptoms and to a group of healthy control subjects.
    The research team included G Longarini, P Richly, MP Temprano, AF Costa, H Vázquez, ML Moreno, S Niveloni, P López, E Smecuol, R Mazure, A González, E Mauriño, and JC Bai. They are variously associated with the Small Bowel Section, Department of Medicine, Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital; Neurocience Cognitive and Traslational Institute (INECO), Favaloro Fundation, CONICET, Buenos Aires; the Brain Health Center (CESAL), Quilmes, Argentina; the Research Council, MSAL, CABA; and with the Research Institute, School of Medicine, Universidad del Salvador.
    The team enrolled fifty adults with symptoms and indications of celiac disease in a prospective cohort without regard to the final diagnosis.  At baseline, all individuals underwent cognitive functional and psychological evaluation. The team then compared celiac disease patients with subjects without celiac disease, and with healthy controls matched by sex, age, and education.
    Celiac disease patients had similar cognitive performance and anxiety, but no significant differences in depression scores compared with disease controls.
    A total of thirty-three subjects were diagnosed with celiac disease. Compared with the 26 healthy control subjects, the 17 celiac disease subjects, and the 17 disease control subjects, who mostly had irritable bowel syndrome, showed impaired cognitive performance (P=0.02 and P=0.04, respectively), functional impairment (P<0.01), and higher depression (P<0.01). 
    From their data, the team noted that any abnormal cognitive functions they saw in adults with newly diagnosed celiac disease did not seem not to be a result of the disease itself. 
    Their results indicate that cognitive dysfunction in celiac patients could be related to long-term symptoms from chronic disease, in general.
    Source:
    J Clin Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 1. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0000000000001018.

    Connie Sarros
    Celiac.com 04/21/2018 - Dear Friends and Readers,
    I have been writing articles for Scott Adams since the 2002 Summer Issue of the Scott-Free Press. The Scott-Free Press evolved into the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. I felt honored when Scott asked me ten years ago to contribute to his quarterly journal and it's been a privilege to write articles for his publication ever since.
    Due to personal health reasons and restrictions, I find that I need to retire. My husband and I can no longer travel the country speaking at conferences and to support groups (which we dearly loved to do) nor can I commit to writing more books, articles, or menus. Consequently, I will no longer be contributing articles to the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. 
    My following books will still be available at Amazon.com:
    Gluten-free Cooking for Dummies Student's Vegetarian Cookbook for Dummies Wheat-free Gluten-free Dessert Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Reduced Calorie Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Cookbook for Kids and Busy Adults (revised version) My first book was published in 1996. My journey since then has been incredible. I have met so many in the celiac community and I feel blessed to be able to call you friends. Many of you have told me that I helped to change your life – let me assure you that your kind words, your phone calls, your thoughtful notes, and your feedback throughout the years have had a vital impact on my life, too. Thank you for all of your support through these years.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/20/2018 - A digital media company and a label data company are teaming up to help major manufacturers target, reach and convert their desired shoppers based on dietary needs, such as gluten-free diet. The deal could bring synergy in emerging markets such as the gluten-free and allergen-free markets, which represent major growth sectors in the global food industry. 
    Under the deal, personalized digital media company Catalina will be joining forces with Label Insight. Catalina uses consumer purchases data to target shoppers on a personal base, while Label Insight works with major companies like Kellogg, Betty Crocker, and Pepsi to provide insight on food label data to government, retailers, manufacturers and app developers.
    "Brands with very specific product benefits, gluten-free for example, require precise targeting to efficiently reach and convert their desired shoppers,” says Todd Morris, President of Catalina's Go-to-Market organization, adding that “Catalina offers the only purchase-based targeting solution with this capability.” 
    Label Insight’s clients include food and beverage giants such as Unilever, Ben & Jerry's, Lipton and Hellman’s. Label Insight technology has helped the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) build the sector’s very first scientifically accurate database of food ingredients, health attributes and claims.
    Morris says the joint partnership will allow Catalina to “enhance our dataset and further increase our ability to target shoppers who are currently buying - or have shown intent to buy - in these emerging categories,” including gluten-free, allergen-free, and other free-from foods.
    The deal will likely make for easier, more precise targeting of goods to consumers, and thus provide benefits for manufacturers and retailers looking to better serve their retail food customers, especially in specialty areas like gluten-free and allergen-free foods.
    Source:
    fdfworld.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/19/2018 - Previous genome and linkage studies indicate the existence of a new disease triggering mechanism that involves amino acid metabolism and nutrient sensing signaling pathways. In an effort to determine if amino acids might play a role in the development of celiac disease, a team of researchers recently set out to investigate if plasma amino acid levels differed among children with celiac disease compared with a control group.
     
    The research team included Åsa Torinsson Naluai, Ladan Saadat Vafa, Audur H. Gudjonsdottir, Henrik Arnell, Lars Browaldh, and Daniel Agardh. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Karolinska University Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institute, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Diabetes & Celiac Disease Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; and with the Nathan S Kline Institute in the U.S.A.
    First, the team used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to analyze amino acid levels in fasting plasma samples from 141 children with celiac disease and 129 non-celiac disease controls. They then crafted a general linear model using age and experimental effects as covariates to compare amino acid levels between children with celiac disease and non-celiac control subjects.
    Compared with the control group, seven out of twenty-three children with celiac disease showed elevated levels of the the following amino acids: tryptophan; taurine; glutamic acid; proline; ornithine; alanine; and methionine.
    The significance of the individual amino acids do not survive multiple correction, however, multivariate analyses of the amino acid profile showed significantly altered amino acid levels in children with celiac disease overall and after correction for age, sex and experimental effects.
    This study shows that amino acids can influence inflammation and may play a role in the development of celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/18/2018 - To the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service animals.
    If you’ve flown anywhere lately, you may have seen them. People flying with their designated “emotional support” animals. We’re not talking genuine service animals, like seeing eye dogs, or hearing ear dogs, or even the Belgian Malinois that alerts its owner when there is gluten in food that may trigger her celiac disease.
    Now, to be honest, some of those animals in question do perform a genuine service for those who need emotional support dogs, like veterans with PTSD.
    However, many of these animals are not service animals at all. Many of these animals perform no actual service to their owners, and are nothing more than thinly disguised pets. Many lack proper training, and some have caused serious problems for the airlines and for other passengers.
    Now the major airlines are taking note and introducing stringent requirements for service animals.
    Delta was the first to strike. As reported by the New York Times on January 19: “Effective March 1, Delta, the second largest US airline by passenger traffic, said it will require passengers seeking to fly with pets to present additional documents outlining the passenger’s need for the animal and proof of its training and vaccinations, 48 hours prior to the flight.… This comes in response to what the carrier said was a 150 percent increase in service and support animals — pets, often dogs, that accompany people with disabilities — carried onboard since 2015.… Delta said that it flies some 700 service animals a day. Among them, customers have attempted to fly with comfort turkeys, gliding possums, snakes, spiders, and other unusual pets.”
    Fresh from an unsavory incident with an “emotional support” peacock incident, United Airlines has followed Delta’s lead and set stricter rules for emotional support animals. United’s rules also took effect March 1, 2018.
    So, to the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service and emotional support animals.
    Source:
    cnbc.com