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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    That Girl - Bullying and Celiac Disease


    Jayci Drew


    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2013 Issue


    Celiac.com 02/08/2017 - "What if the kid you bullied at school, grew up, and turned out to be the only surgeon who could save your life?" --Lynette Mather


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    If you ask any high school senior what in their life has changed the most since kindergarten, statistics show that many would answer moving from one school to another. However, the more drastic of changes are seen such as illnesses diagnosed during these critical school ages. In 2009 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, and that diagnosis has impacted my life in both positive and negative ways for my past, present, and future time at Indiana Area High School and beyond. Personally I have had to deal with bullying because of my disabilities. Bullying by definition is the use of force or coercion to abuse or intimidate others. I along with 20% of my peers nationwide in grades 9-12 (The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System) experience bullying in many different forms. Bullying can be teasing, hitting, leaving someone out, whispering behind backs, online harassment, shoving, remarks about race, sexuality, and disabilities. Before my diagnosis I was considered "normal" but as a result of my illness and "strange" dietary needs therefore I have been bullied. However, looking back on my experience I am happy to have dealt with the resistance because it has made me a better, more confident individual.

    I, like three million fellow Americans nationwide (National Celiac Disease), must deal with the stress of having celiac disease. I was diagnosed in 2009 after having lost my eyesight to a migraine. Celiac Disease is an often under-diagnosed autoimmune disease wherein the person cannot eat wheat, rye, barley, or oats, otherwise known as gluten, because their antibodies will attack their own system leading to other serious health issues such as cancer. Celiac Disease is spread through genes; my entire family, including my father, mother, and sister, has this disease. However, even with the growing awareness of celiac disease, there is also a growing skepticism. "Critics" of my disease claim that the gluten free diet is a fad. Many celebrities have tried to lose weight and failed to stay on this difficult diet. Restaurant chains are coming out with new gluten free menus every day to raise prices and profits, though they refuse to educate their servers about what someone with a gluten "allergy" cannot eat. While some people are sympathetic and know the outstanding facts about celiac disease, most of the population stays in the dark about this ailment. This causes frustration for people with celiac disease, like me, to have to deal with the resulting brick wall of resistance.

    In my small community it is very rare for someone to have such a disease that the public knows little about. This can cause doubt and disbelief, especially at a high school where everyone is just trying to "fit in". When I was diagnosed in 2009, I had just started ninth grade and I had also started playing two high school sports, softball and tennis. For the softball team it was a well-known fact that after every away game the softball boosters would buy each girl a twelve inch sub from a local deli to eat on the way home. Whenever my parents and I contacted the booster president to explain the situation with my disability and that I simply would like to have a salad, we were met with backlash. I did not understand at the time why a parent would refuse to supply another child with food after a physical activity when everyone else was getting a meal. This quickly made me an outcast on the softball team as the "strange girl with the made up disease", causing me to feel stressed and awful about myself over something that I could not control. I would have loved to have been able to "fit in" and eat the subs like my teammates rather than being different, especially after growing up able to eat gluten! It was a hard transition to make. I went from being able to eat the subs, donuts, pizza, and any other fast-food product to a strict dietary regime.

    After my long process through the education system, I finally got the meal I had a right to have. Unfortunately, the boosters' actions, forced us to go through the school system to "prove" I had a legitimate excuse not to eat the subs. I was distanced from other members of the team and, in subsequent years, had to deal with backlash from my teammates. They do not understand that it is not a personal choice to avoid gluten. I have a disability. I simply cannot eat it. Instead, they go back to the first year when I was eating the same foods they ate, and I get blamed for wanting to be "special" and get the more expensive food. I know that I am not alone in my struggle and that people with celiac disease around the world deal with what I deal with everyday - just like others who are bullied for being different.

    The after effects from my being bullied have shown themselves even in everyday situations. I have learned a great deal about myself and respect for other individuals' differences. I believe that if I had not been bullied I would not have the self-confidence, integrity, sense of right and wrong, or leadership skills that I have now. It has allowed me to go above and beyond in tough situations, knowing that I can overcome them. I know that even though the times are tough with my disability, and that while others may never understand mine, I can certainly understand and respect theirs. I respect and do not judge others simply based on what they can or cannot eat. I also know that just because someone does not "look" ill on the outside does not mean they are not dealing with something awful on the inside. This allows me to make friends easily and to understand others more effectively. Being bullied has also allowed me to learn new leadership skills that I use in my volunteer work. I am confident in myself that I can go forward into the world of higher education and succeed because of the values I now hold dear.

    The most drastic change I have encountered in my high school career is the diagnosis of celiac disease in 2009. This diagnosis has impacted my life in both positive and negative ways, in the past, present, and future at Indiana Area High School and beyond. I have had to deal with bullying because of my disabilities. Bullying, by definition. is the use of force or coercion to abuse or intimidate others. I along with 20% of my peers nationwide in grades 9-12 (The Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System) experience bullying in many different forms. After dealing with the effects of my being bullied, I know that it has made me a better person. I can travel the world and make lasting relationships based on acknowledging and respecting differences in every person I encounter.


    Image Caption: Bully Advance Screening Hosted by First Lady Katie O'Malley. by Jay Baker at Baltimore, Maryland. Image: CC--Maryland GovPics
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    Guest Samiullah

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    Hi Jayci, I can relate to what you have gone through. I was also in same situation when I was diagnosed with Celiac 1.5 yrs. ago. Awareness about Celiac in Indian society is still a alien thing. As you said, it helps us to be compassionate towards others as we might not knowing what they are going through. Regards, Sami.

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    hi there i a curenntly being bullied and my bullies use perfume and flowers and deodrants to give me asthma attacks and they also mock me about my severe celiac disease 

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    Danna Korn


    If you have a lot of tension and you get a headache, do what it says on the aspirin bottle: Take two aspirin and Keep away from children.
    The transition from summer to back-to-school is paradoxical. On one hand, summer means sleeping in, adventuresome vacations, evenings free of homework and obligatory assignments, and a chance for parents to take pleasure in their kids carefree, relaxed summer schedule (or lack thereof). On the other hand, mantras like, Im bored, Are we there yet? Theres nothing to do here, and the non-stop sibling bickering that seems to escalate when one child dares to breathe the same air as another has some parents singing, Its the most wonderful time of the year a good four months before Christmas.

    But its not always the most wonderful time of the year. For parents whose children cant eat gluten, sending kids to school can create an entirely new dimension of anxiety that extend far beyond the typical back-to-school blues: What will he eat for lunch? What if there are birthday parties and my child cant participate? Will kids make fun of him? Will the teacher take time to understand his condition? What if he eats the Play Doh? How can I make this easier for him?
    This is harder on you than it is on your child
    If your child is newly diagnosed with celiac disease, or is new to the gluten-free diet, I know youre thinking, Oh, no its not! She just doesnt understand how hard this is. When I speak at conferences and tell parents this is harder on them than it is on their kids, I inevitably have one or two - always the parents of newly diagnosed celiac kids - who respectfully (and usually temperamentally) disagree. They tell me I dont understand.
    Believe me, I do understand. But also believe me that this is harder on you than it is your child. Its harder, because of the very nature of being a parent. We love our kids so intensely that every pain they experience hurts us ten times more. Nothing breaks our hearts more than to know that our children may experience heartache. But remember, one of our most important jobs as parents is to teach our children how to deal with unpleasant experiences and emotions. As Anne Bronte said, If you would have your son to walk honorably through the world, you must not attempt to clear the stones from his path, but teach him to walk firmly over them.

    Tips to make it easier
    Give your child control of his diet.
    Yep, even if hes just two years old. Anyone who has heard me speak or has read either of my books knows that Im an absolute nag about telling you to give your child control of his diet, because if he doesnt control his diet, his diet will control him. Educate your teachers and principal.
    Set a meeting with your childs teacher(s) and principal to explain your childs condition and diet. The best time to do this is a day or two before school starts for the year. The teachers are usually at school setting up their classrooms, but theyre not yet distracted with new students, parents, and classroom responsibilities. Provide the teachers, principal, and the school nurse, if you have one, with clear, concise written materials explaining celiac disease and your childs diet. Some people find it helpful to give the book Kids with Celiac Disease to the school, so that the nurse, teachers, and principal can more thoroughly understand the condition and diet. Make sure they understand the severity of accidental gluten ingestion. Remind them that they should contact you if there are any questions, rather than taking a chance. Lunches: use good judgment.
    Most of the time, the people in charge of preparing food for children in a preschool or school setting are already used to dealing with lactose intolerance, peanut allergies, and other dietary restrictions. Talk to the dietitian or person in charge of food preparation. Go over the menu plans, discuss the foods your child can and cant have, and talk about the importance of using clean utensils to avoid cross-contamination. If you feel comfortable with the persons understanding and acceptance of the diet, give them the opportunity to accommodate your childs special diet. You always have the option of sending in your own meals if you think its not working out. If you are interested in your childs legal rights to reduced-cost school lunches, see Kids with Celiac Disease under Section 504. Talk to the adult lunchtime supervisors.
    Kids will swap food. Its an age-old tradition, and its not likely to stop with your child. Aside from the likelihood of getting gluten, your child may end up hungry. Sometimes your childs goodies are better than the other childs, and it makes your child so proud that shell gladly give them all away, to be left with nothing. So the best you can do is explain to your child why she cant trade food with her buddies, and make sure the lunch area monitors are keeping an eye out for swappers. Out of snack and lunch ideas? See Kids with Celiac Disease.
    Its loaded with snack and menu ideas, many of which travel well in lunch boxes and bags. Give the teacher a stash of gluten-free treats.
    A large bag of Halloween-sized individually wrapped candies works well, and because theyre individually wrapped, the teacher can keep them in a cupboard without the threat of ant invasions. Let the teacher know that these treats are to be used any time there is a special event during which treats will be served. Make sure the treats are your childs favorite; you dont want him feeling like hes being short-changed. Get a schedule of classmates birthdays and scheduled holiday parties.
    Teachers are glad to provide you with a listing of everyones birthdays. This way you know in advance when there will be parties. You can coordinate with the other childs parent, or send your child in with her own cupcake or treat. If theres a surprise event, your child always has the stash of candy youve given the teacher. On your childs birthday, bring a popular gluten-free treat for the entire class.
    Its best not to risk celebrating your childs birthday with gluten-free cupcakes. Its possible that everyone in your childs class might like your homemade gluten-free cupcakes. On the other hand, there may be one kid who, for whatever reason, takes one bite and spits it across the classroom, declaring, What IS this stuff? You can bet your child wont forget that incident for a very long time. Its best not to risk it. Instead, bring in ice cream bars or ice cream sundaes. Or, if you cant do frozen foods, bring cutely decorated candy bars or goodie bags filled with candy (brands that everyone knows). It will bring your child immense pleasure to share treats with the class that she can eat too (and kids like that stuff better than cupcakes anyway!). Of course, you will want to be sensitive to any of your childs classmates who might have peanut or other allergies, and choose treats that everyone in the class can enjoy. Ask for liberal restroom privileges.
    Many teachers restrict the number of times children are allowed to go to the restroom, or they ask children to wait until a more appropriate, less disruptive time. Let the teacher know that your childs condition may require a hasty trip to the restroom, and that he should under no circumstances be restricted from going. You may even want to establish a little code between your child and her teacher, so that he can inconspicuously dismiss himself. Its a little less embarrassing than having to ask. Consider talking to the parents at the parents-only back-to-school night.
    Most schools have a back-to-school night for parents only. This is a great time to talk to the other parents about your childs condition and diet. Not only will you be helping them to understand and accommodate your childs diet, but you will be educating dozens more people about celiac disease - something we should all be doing on a regular basis. Dont be mad when people dont accommodate your childs diet.
    Its going to happen. Someone will have surprise treats for the class that your child cant eat, and the teachers secret stash will be empty. Or someone will decide its baking day, and your child will be the only one not sampling the goods. Dont be annoyed, offended, or angry. These people arent intentionally trying to leave your child out, nor are they being insensitive. They simply forget sometimes!
    Most importantly, remember that your child is learning from your reactions. He will be in situations like this for the rest of his life - teach him to be gracious, politely declining the treats offered to him, and to accept the fact that this is just one of those little stones in his path of life that hell need to learn to step over...with a smile and the knowledge that people generally mean well.
     

    Danna Korn
    This article originally appeared in the Winter 2004 edition of Celiac.com's Journal of Gluten-Sensitivity.
    Celiac.com 10/04/2010 - When Tyler was diagnosed with celiac disease at the age of 18 months, I wanted desperately to talk to a kid––one who could talk––about what it’s like to have celiac disease.  Do you feel jipped?  Does it make you sad?  Do you feel “different” from the other kids?!?  I was heartbroken––grief-stricken––I had a long way to go before I would evolve into the cheerleader I hope I’ve become in helping people live––and love––the gluten-free lifestyle.
    Oh, sure, friends and family told me “it would be okay,” the way friends and family do in tough situations.  But I felt they were just placating me––after all, what did they know?  They hadn’t even heard of celiac disease before I had explained the diagnosis.  And to be honest, I didn’t care much at that time about what adults thought of the situation––I wanted desperately to hear from a kid: “Look at me––I turned out just fine!”
    That was nearly 13 years ago, and there weren’t any kids who had celiac disease––none that I knew of, anyway.  So we blazed our own trail, working hard to approach our unique challenges with optimism each and every step of the way.
    Recently, I was reminded of the way I felt when Tyler was first diagnosed, when a woman with tears in her eyes approached me after one of my talks.  “I know you talk about how we can all learn to live and love this lifestyle, and I appreciate your suggestions for raising happy, healthy, gluten-free kids––but,” she seemed shy and embarrassed to continue, looking at the floor as she asked, “would you mind if I talked directly to Tyler?”
    But of course!  How could I have forgotten?  That need to talk to a child who had been through it was so compelling at first––and now Tyler could talk!  Sure you can, was my automatic reply, knowing that my 14 (and-a-half) year-old-I-at-least-like-to-pretend-that-everything-you-do-annoys-me son would be less than thrilled to take the call. 
    I would love for Tyler to write an article telling you how celiac disease is no big deal in his life.  He did so a few years ago for my first book, “Kids with Celiac Disease,” when he wrote Chapter One:  “What it’s like to be a kid with celiac disease,” but that was when he was only ten.  That was before he turned into a teenager and had to start pretending not to want to do the things we ask him to do.
    The truth is that this has never been a big deal for Tyler.  We gave him control of his diet from day one, which I believe is crucial.  We have always maintained an optimistic, yet realistic approach, with Tyler and his non-celiac but oh-so-supportive sister Kelsie, her being our guiding light in terms of inspiration and positive attitude.
    One day, a few months after he had been interviewed on a local TV station, Tyler was approached by a woman who attended one of our R.O.C.K. (Raising Our Celiac Kids) parties.  I watched with curiosity and felt somewhat protective and guarded as this woman I didn’t know quickly approached him and took one of his hands in both of hers in what seemed to be an affectionate gesture.  “Tyler, you have changed my life,” she said boldly.  Then 13 years old, he did what most 13-year-old boys might do, and said nothing––shooting an anxious glance my way, looking for guidance, but I was as bewildered as him.  She began to get tears in her eyes as she continued.  “I’m 65 years old.  Three months ago, I was as sick as I could be.  I had been to dozens of doctors, and had a list of symptoms a mile long.  Everyone thought I was crazy––I even had to quit my job, because I was so sick.  I truly wanted to die.  Then I saw you on TV talking about celiac disease.  I insisted on being tested, and was positive for celiac disease.  I’ve been gluten-free ever since, and feel absolutely wonderful.”  With that, she gave him a bear hug, and he shot me a glance that I couldn’t read. 
    I’ve learned not to embarrass my kids (well, sometimes I do it intentionally, but that’s another story), so I said nothing, and Tyler went about his business.  Several minutes later, Tyler approached me with a beaming smile.  “Mom, now I know why you do this!  It feels really good to help other people!” 
    He has since decided that he’s blessed to have celiac disease, because it has provided him with an opportunity to reach out and help others––an act that even at his young age he realizes is as satisfying for him as it is for those he helps.  Quite a perspective for a teenage boy, if I may brag about him a little!
    So while I would love for Tyler to write an article about this, those of you who have teenagers understand that it would be easier to teach my dog quantum physics than to have him sit down and write an article––so you’ll have to take my word for it.  Thankfully, at this point, Tyler is a happy, healthy, gluten-free young man who thinks a lot more about baseball and his friends than he does about the restrictions of his diet.  Other kids, teens, and young men and women I’ve met over the years have been equally optimistic and inspiring.  So rest easy, parents––your kids will, in fact, be just fine…and I really do know this!


    Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.
    Celiac.com 07/19/2016 - We know that celiac disease afflicts almost 1% of the general population (1). We also know that about 12% of the general population has non-celiac gluten sensitivity, as indicated by elevated IgG class anti-gliadin antibodies in their blood (2). Although elevated antibodies identified by this test are often dismissed as "non-specific", they are clear evidence that the immune system is mounting a reaction against the most common food in our western diet. It is also true that many people who produce these antibodies and have then excluded gluten from their diets have also experienced improved health. Unfortunately, most of the individuals who have elevated IgG anti-gliadin antibodies and might benefit from avoiding gluten do not know that they are gluten sensitive and/or have celiac disease. Thus, we really don't know how many, or which, school children should be avoiding gluten to optimize their academic potential as they work their way through the education system.
    Approaching this issue from a different angle, we know that between 10% and 15% of the U.S. population has dyslexia (3). About 60% of those with ADHD have dyslexia (3). If we calculate the prevalence of ADHD, at 8.8% of the population (4), then just the ADHD component, it should give us 5.28% of the population with dyslexia. But we can't tell how much overlap there is between this group and the group that constitutes between 10% and 15% of the population that are reported as having dyslexia. These disabilities have been given considerable attention and have been studied for some time, yet we really know little about their causes, except in cases of traumatic brain injury.
    However, there is a startling study, reported in The Times ten years ago, from the Nunnykirk School in Northumberland, U.K. (5). The astounding results of this study continue to cry out for further research and possible replication. After 6 months on a gluten-free diet, testing showed that 11 of the 12 (92%) live-in students had improved their reading and comprehension at more than twice the rate at which regular students are expected to improve. Among the 22 students living in the community and attending this special school for dyslexic students during the day, 17 of them (77%) showed similar improvements (5). To put these results in perspective, special needs teachers are often very proud when they can help students achieve at rates similar to regular students. Doubling the rates of improvement is an astonishingly positive result! And a few of these students leaped ahead at six times the rate of normal students! The numbers of students involved in this study are too small to allow us to extrapolate to other dyslexic populations. And, given that the research was done in the United Kingdom, where definitions of learning disabilities, and other factors may be dissimilar, and that the work was reported in a newspaper instead of a peer reviewed journal, and the startlingly positive nature of these results, we really need further, carefully designed studies to explore this phenomenon.
    The Nunnykirk findings are consistent with the extensive brain and neurological research that has been done at the Royal Hallamshire Hospital at the University of Sheffield, over the last two decades, by Marios Hadjivassiliou and his colleagues. They have found that a strict gluten-free diet can often relieve central and peripheral neurological symptoms.
    Further, many prominent researchers who work with children and adults who have dyslexia characterize it as a neurobiological condition, and can demonstrate, with MRI, altered brain function in dyslexia (8). It is also clear that many cases of dyslexia are at least partly genetically conferred (8, 9). Neither are learning disabilities limited to dyslexia. Although some practitioners lump two or more learning disabilities together, the literature distinguishes between dyslexia, dysgraphia, dyspraxia, dyscalculia, dysphasia/aphasia, auditory processing disorders, visual processing disorders, etc. Some such practitioners not only differentiate between types of learning disabilities, they also differentiate between sub-types of disabilities. For instance, motor dysgraphia (where fine motor speed is impaired), dyslexic dysgraphia (where normal fine motor speed allows them to draw or copy but impairs spontaneous writing) and spatial dysgraphia (where handwriting is illegible due to distortion) can each be identified based on symptoms (10). Similar sub-types are seen in other learning disabilities.
    But what if the findings at Nunnykirk School are broadly applicable to all of these types of learning problems? Or perhaps further research can tell us which types and sub-types of learning disabilities can often be alleviated by a gluten-free diet.
    My own professional observations suggest that the number of students helped by a gluten-free diet would be similar to the proportions seen at Nunnykirk School. I have also observed that as the strictness of the diet increases, so does the number of students who improve. However, the diagnosing professionals are becoming reluctant to differentiate, even between general types of learning disabilities such as dyslexia and dysgraphia. As teachers, we were told that a child had learning disabilities and then, if not specified in the documents we were given, we had to figure out exactly what type of disability they had, then devise or research effective ways of teaching these students. I have done a little of both, but my experience is that this choice varies from one teacher to the next, and one situation to the next. Unfortunately, depending on the individual teacher's workload, teaching background, and personal biases, these children can sometimes be neglected or under-served, a choice that is often dictated by excessive workloads and demands on teachers' time to perform other tasks, especially extensive reporting and supervising sports and other extra-curricular activities.
    Please recall the overlap between dyslexia and ADHD mentioned earlier (3), and consider that there are ten reports of connections between attention deficit disorders and celiac disease published in the peer reviewed medical literature. Now, please recall that about 60% of these ADHD children will have dyslexia (3). Since the current, and past issues, of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, require that ADHD and learning disorders each be differentiated from any medical condition that might be causing the same symptoms and be alleviated by resolution of the medical condition in question. On that basis alone, almost every child being considered for a diagnosis of learning disorders or ADHD should be thoroughly tested for celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity.
    Yet, I would be very surprised to learn that this is commonly being done. Thus, we have a situation in which we are forced to rely upon a study conducted by a group of teachers, in cooperation with parents and students, that was published in The Times (5) and we must take action on our own because, as yet, celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity are not yet being differentiated from ADHD and/or learning disabilities. The really tragic part of this story is that a gluten-free diet, if started early enough, can reduce or completely eliminate all of these problems with learning disabilities and attention deficits, when gluten is the underlying problem.
    If you or your spouse are gluten sensitive, or have celiac disease, do you also have children who struggle in school? Based on the data from Nunnykirk School, current blood tests are probably not sufficient to rule out those who would benefit from a gluten-free diet. For the moment, you may need to institute a trial of a gluten-free diet, as mentioned above, while we await further research in this area. But wouldn't it be valuable for succeeding generations to know, or have a pretty clear idea whether the diet could help? And with what types and/or sub-types of learning disorders? That's where more research could really help. We already know that there is an association between gluten sensitivity and seizure disorders, ataxia and cerebellar degeneration, neuropathy (damage to peripheral nervous system), schizophrenia, depression, migraine, anxiety disorders, autism, multiple sclerosis, myasthenia gravis (an autoimmune neuromuscular disease), and white matter lesions in the brain (11). It should not be surprising if gluten underlies many or most cases of learning disorders and attention deficits. And if research can tell us which cases would be most likely to benefit from the diet, that will be a huge step forward for parents, students, teachers, and government agencies that provide funding for the education of those who are afflicted with these ailments.
    In the meantime, we only have the information that we have. So, despite its many weaknesses, the Nunnykirk investigation of dyslexic children argues for experimental implementation, on a trial basis. I would suggest at least a six-months-long period of strict gluten avoidance to determine whether it will help individuals who suffer from dyslexia and/or other learning disabilities.
    Sources:
    1. Fasano A, Berti I, Gerarduzzi T, Not T, Colletti RB, Drago S, Elitsur Y, Green PH, Guandalini S, Hill ID, Pietzak M, Ventura A, Thorpe M, Kryszak D, Fornaroli F, Wasserman SS, Murray JA, Horvath K. Prevalence of celiac disease in at-risk and not-at-risk groups in the United States: a large multicenter study. Arch Intern Med. 2003 Feb 10;163(3):286-92.
    2. Hadjivassiliou M, Grünewald R A, Davies-Jones G A B. Gluten sensitivity as a neurological illness. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2002;72:560-563.
    3. Dyslexia Research Institute http://www.dyslexia-add.org/
    4. National Resource Center on ADHD http://www.help4adhd.org/about/statistics
    5. Blair http://www.thetimes.co.uk/tto/news/uk/article1924736.ece
    6. Hadjivassiliou M, Gibson A, Davies-Jones GA, Lobo AJ, Stephenson TJ, Milford-Ward A. Does cryptic gluten sensitivity play a part in neurological illness? Lancet. 1996 Feb 10;347(8998):369-71.
    7. Aziz I, Hadjivassiliou M. Coeliac disease: noncoeliac gluten sensitivity--food for thought. Nat Rev Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2014 Jul;11(7):398-9.
    8. Shaywitz SE, Shaywitz BA. The Neurobiology of Reading and Dyslexia. Focus on Basics - Connecting Research & Practice, Volume 5,A: Aug. 2001. http://www.ncsall.net/index.html@id=278.html
    9. Eicher JD, Powers NR, Miller LL, Mueller KL, Mascheretti S, Marino C, Willcutt EG, DeFries JC, Olson RK, Smith SD, Pennington BF, Tomblin JB, Ring SM, Gruen JR. Characterization of the DYX2 locus on chromosome 6p22 with reading disability, language impairment, and IQ. Hum Genet. 2014 Jul;133(7):869-81.
    10. About Education http://specialed.about.com/od/readingliteracy/a/Dyslexia-And-Dysgraphia.htm
    11. Jackson JR, Eaton WW, Cascella NG, Fasano A, Kelly DL.Neurologic and psychiatric manifestations of celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. Psychiatr Q. 2012 Mar;83(1):91-102.
    12. Diaconu G, Burlea M, Grigore I, Anton DT, Trandafir LM. Celiac disease with neurologic manifestations in children. Rev Med Chir Soc Med Nat Iasi. 2013 Jan-Mar;117(1):88-94. PubMed PMID: 24505898.
    13. Niederhofer H. Association of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and celiac disease: a brief report. Prim Care Companion CNS Disord. 2011;13(3). pii: PCC.10br01104PMCID: PMC3184556.
    14. Niederhofer H, Pittschieler K. A preliminary investigation of ADHD symptoms in persons with celiac disease. J Atten Disord. 2006 Nov;10(2):200-4.
    15. Zelnik N, Pacht A, Obeid R, Lerner A. Range of neurologic disorders in patients with celiac disease. Pediatrics. 2004 Jun;113(6):1672-6.
    16. Kozłowska ZE. [Evaluation of mental status of children with malabsorption syndrome after long-term treatment with gluten-free diet (preliminary report)]. Psychiatr Pol. 1991 Mar-Apr;25(2):130-4. Polish.
    17. Diaconu G, Burlea M, Grigore I, Anton DT, Trandafir LM. Celiac disease with neurologic manifestations in children. Rev Med Chir Soc Med Nat Iasi. 2013 Jan-Mar;117(1):88-94. PubMed PMID: 24505898.
    18. Niederhofer H. Association of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and celiac disease: a brief report. Prim Care Companion CNS Disord. 2011;13(3). pii: PCC.10br01104. PMCID: PMC3184556.
    19. Niederhofer H, Pittschieler K. A preliminary investigation of ADHD symptoms in persons with celiac disease. J Atten Disord. 2006 Nov;10(2):200-4.
    20. 4: Zelnik N, Pacht A, Obeid R, Lerner A. Range of neurologic disorders in patients with celiac disease. Pediatrics. 2004 Jun;113(6):1672-6.
    21. Kozłowska ZE. [Evaluation of mental status of children with malabsorption syndrome after long-term treatment with gluten-free diet (preliminary report)]. Psychiatr Pol. 1991 Mar-Apr;25(2):130-4. Polish.

    Nicole Vela
    Celiac.com 08/02/2016 - One thing I have noticed since becoming a parent is how every place we go there are treats and candy. Even cashiers hand out candy at the checkout. Food is everywhere. Our kids are constantly being bombarded with sugary baked goods and salty snacks.
    Wow, how times have changed! When I was a kid, and yes, my saying that makes me sound ancient, but it was only the 80's...back then we were sent outside in the morning and all of the neighborhood kids convened in someone's backyard. We went home for lunch and moms certainly did not hand out treats, especially not butterfly shaped waffles or any of the other Pinterest-inspired foods out there. We considered ourselves pretty lucky if someone had Freeze Pops in their house. If you are raising a child gluten-free, you know how much of a challenge it is that everything revolves around food.
    The diagnosis of celiac disease or non-celiac gluten sensitivity is a huge eye opener for many. I think one of the hardest things for a family starting a gluten-free diet is how different our diet is from the way most people cook and eat. Since the 1950's we have morphed from TV dinners to buying entire meals from the grocery store deli, and our breads, cakes, and rolls from the bakery. And we've moved from a dinner out being a rare treat to the drive-thru being the norm for many families. Some parents never learned how to cook themselves, so it can be quite a shock to go from a world of just picking up dinner at the drive-thru or the deli, to a world of cooking from scratch at home. I know. I was a processed foods kid, and now I am definitely a "semi-homemade" cook.
    Going gluten-free can be overwhelming at first. It will get easier. Here are a few tips and resources for raising a gluten-free child.
    Take advantage of the internet and your smart phone. I love subscribing to digital gluten-free magazines, finding new recipes and reading books from my Kindle App. Make grocery shopping easy by using The Gluten-Free Grocery Guide by Triumph Dining (1). They have produced an app that tells you which foods are gluten-free at the grocery store. The app features popular brands and even includes store brands. They have done the research for you by calling brands and manufacturers to create this resource. I know how hard it is getting through the grocery store with kids in tow. It needs to be as easy as possible!
    Know that you are not alone. There are many other parents facing the same obstacles as you. Surround yourself with support. R.O.C.K, Raising Our Celiac Kids (2) is a support group that can help you with the challenges ahead. Two other support groups you may look into are The Gluten Intolerance Group (3) and Celiac Sprue Association (4), while these are not groups for kids, they still provide valuable help and information.
    Talk to family and friends about the seriousness of your child's needs. A lot of people don't understand how celiac disease or gluten sensitivity effects someone. Educate them. Make it clear that foods can't just be given to your kid, even a food that one may think of as gluten-free. Tell them about hidden sources of gluten. Let them know why a gluten-free menu at a restaurant may not actually be gluten-free. If your child spends a lot of time with a relative go over items in their home, like their toaster, that may be sources of cross contamination.
    Teach your child the effects of cheating on their diet can do. Short term and long term. There are going to be many times of temptation. They are eventually going to be teenagers and have their own transportation and money. They need to be able to make smart choices as young adults.
    Be prepared for class parties and classmates' birthdays. I suggest making it easier for yourself by giving a good supply of treats to your kid's teacher and having a good store of treats at home. Some yummy pre-packaged treats are Jelly Belly Snack Packs, Enjoy Life Cookies, and Lucy's Cookies. These are great choices for multiple food sensitivities. I also recommend packing snacks for around town, play dates, and after school activities. Having healthy gluten-free snacks on hand is important for when there may not be any allergy-friendly snacks available.
    I try to stick to as many natural foods as possible, but occasionally, I like a treat or an easy meal. Thanks to the huge growth in gluten-free consumers there are a ton of food choices available. Gluten-free pizza, mac 'n' cheese, chicken tenders, cookies, pasta, even gluten-free toaster pastries. If you live in a rural area, with stores that don't carry a lot of gluten-free items, take advantage of online shopping. I like the ease of shopping from Amazon, Vitacost and The Gluten-Free Mall. As a busy mom I love that I can get items delivered to my door.
    Get your kids in the kitchen. Teaching your kids to cook is an invaluable resource that will serve them life-long. Learning how to make a meal from whole natural foods can be fun and it teaches them how to eat a healthy diet. You can do this yourself or there are a lot of kids' cooking programs at local culinary centers, grocery stores, and community centers.
    Kids will adapt and adjust. If they are older and have been eating gluten-containing foods their whole lives, it will be more difficult because their palates have been formed. Try to ease the transition by having them go grocery shopping with you so they can learn what is still available to them, and then do something fun like chocolate gluten-free waffles. Or pick up some gluten-free ice cream cones and ice cream. Let them know they don't have to give up everything. Having a positive attitude is essential. Children will model what you show them.
    References:
    http://www.triumphdining.com/glutenfree/apps.php https://www.celiac.com/articles/563/1/ROCK-Raising-Our-Celiac-Kids---National-Celiac-Disease-Support-Group/Page1.html https://www.gluten.net/gluten-intolerance-group-branch-offices/ 4.http://www.csaceliacs.info/find.jsp

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/03/2017 - Previous studies have shown us that men are generally less troubled living with celiac disease than are women, but most studies of men with celiac disease have been mostly quantitative, and have a bio-medical emphasis.
    A team of researchers recently set out to explore the social experience of young men with screening-detected celiac disease and to highlight daily life situations five years after diagnosis. The research team included Ethel Kautto, Cecilia Olsson, Anneli Ivarsson, Phil Lyon, Agneta Hörnell, and Lena Alex. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Food and Nutrition and Umeå Center for Gender Studies, Umeå University, Sweden, the Department of Food and Nutrition, Umeå University, Sweden, the Department of Public Health and Clinical Medicine, Epidemiology and Global Health, Umeå University, Sweden, the School of Arts, Social Sciences and Management at Queen Margaret University, UK, and the Department of Nursing at Umeå University in Sweden.
    Using a large Swedish school-based celiac screening-study, the team arranged to interview seven young men, all of whom were diagnosed with celiac disease at 13 years-old.
    The semi-structured interviews were analyzed from a gender perspective which resulted in three themes. Those themes were of young adult men being subjected to changes, striving for normality and emphasizing commitment.
    Many of young men reported dissociating themselves from being seen as a person with a life-long chronic disease.
    The analysis also showed that the young men’s daily experiences of living with celiac disease largely depended on their use of characteristics known to be associated with masculinity: such as being self-assured, demanding, and behaving authoritatively.
    In food situations, where the young men had the ability to make use of such characteristics in their informal group, they experienced fewer negative aspects of the disease.
    If the young men did not hold a strong position in their informal group, their situation was insecure and vulnerable and this could lead to avoidance of contacts and social meal situations.
    So, basically, being relaxed and socially confident about eating gluten-free helps to ensure success with the diet.
    Source:
    International Journal of Celiac Disease Vol. 4, No. 4, 2016, pp 138-145. doi: 10.12691/ijcd-4-4-7

    Lisa Cantkier
    Celiac.com 03/08/2017 - With summer coming soon, many parents want their child to experience summer camp. If your child has gluten intolerance (and/or other special dietary needs) the summer camp anticipation and experience itself can be anxiety provoking for you, and for your child. As a parent, it is normal to have concerns about sending your child to camp, of course, particularly when the camp is providing meals. Here are some simple tips to help you advocate for your gluten intolerant child, and keep him/her safe at camp this summer. Not only should parents be their child's advocate - parents also need to teach their child how to be a well educated self advocate. Many of these tips are also applicable to school settings, birthday parties and other social gatherings.
    Prior to each camp session, schedule a meeting with your child's supervising camp staff to discuss your child's dietary needs. Be very clear about what your child can and can't tolerate, as well as the short-term and long-term consequences of consumption of those foods. Bring copies of helpful facts and information, and even myths to educate the staff. You can also bring helpful books and/or videos to share. Any notes from your child's health professionals may be helpful as well. Let the staff know you mean business and you take your child's needs very seriously. Your child should never be turned away from a camp due to their dietary needs. That would be a conflict of the Human Rights Code!
    Request that your child's camp staff post an educational fact sheet in the camp office, staffroom, and main rooms in the camp building about his/her dietary needs and condition (e.g., celiac disease), as well as a list of foods that your child must avoid.
    Get a medical alert bracelet for your child, and list your child's condition(s) (e.g.,. celiac disease), as well as your child's dietary needs clearly (e.g., gluten intolerant). Allerbling.com is a great resource and they offer fun colors and patterns.
    Ask the camp staff if you can come into the camp one day and have a discussion with the campers about your child's condition/food intolerance. You can even find out if you can bring in props, such as products your child is and is not allowed. You might want to bring in a short video about celiac disease and the gluten-free diet.
    Find out if there will be birthdays being celebrated at camp, and then contact the parents of the birthday child the week before, and again the day before the birthday party to inform and remind them about your child's food intolerance. You could also offer to bring treats that your child is allowed.
    Send some "back up" snacks and treats for your child for camp staff to store, even if it's a package of cookies, or a cupcake – just in case there are celebrations or times when treats are given out that your child cannot have.
    Teach your child about his/her food intolerance, and teach your child to share the information with others. It is a good idea for your child to learn how to self-advocate at a young age. If your child is very young, you can teach through the use of puppets. Research shows that young children learn very well through the use of puppets.
    Many non-profit associations offer camps, support groups and educational programs for children. Gather information from trusted organizations such as the Canadian Celiac Association or the Celiac Sprue Association.
    Be positive – learn to look on the bright side, and teach your child to do so as well. There are many advantages to living gluten-free. Keeping positive and demonstrating strength will make your child stronger and better able to cope. Remind your child regularly that their differences are what make them special!

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/30/2017 - Huff Post recently featured a good article on empowering kids with food allergies, including celiac disease.
    The article, by Miriam Pearl, suggests that parents seek to promote awareness and self-reliance in such children, rather than simply providing for them quietly and looking to protect them from allergens.
    The basic message is to help kids gain all the skills needed to manage their condition, rather than seeking to rescue them. Pearl writes that "The more practice [children] have managing themselves in the outside world the better they will get at it." She offers a number of useful tips to help parents along.
    First, she says, start early. It's never too early to let kids know what's going on, and what you're doing to help them maintain their health.
    Second, work to make the children aware of the things that impact their health. Show them what it's like to shop, cook, and advocate for themselves.
    Third, strive to show, teach and model everything they must know about safe foods and danger foods.
    Fourth, take them to the store with you and let them find gluten-free items. Among other benefits, this will help them learn to read labels.
    Fifth, enlist their help in packing their lunches.
    Sixth, ask them to listen to whenever and wherever you ask for food that is safe.
    Seventh, make sure they learn to carry their own snacks, just in case they can't control what food is around them.
    If they learn to do it early, they might avoid learning the hard way, which happens when you forget to provide snack for them, and they go hungry while everyone else eats.
    Lastly, when dining out, engage them in your effort to get answers from waiters every time you order food.
    Helping children to clearly see and understand the challenges of being gluten-free and having food allergies, and what it means to deal with those challenges on a daily level, help prepare them to make the right choices when confronted with unfamiliar or uncomfortable situations involving gluten-free food. This, in turn, helps them lead happier, healthier gluten-free lives.
    Source:
    HuffPost.com

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/22/2018 - Proteins are the building blocks of life. If scientists can figure out how to create and grow new proteins, they can create new treatments and cures to a multitude of medical, biological and even environmental conditions.
    For a couple of decades now, scientists have been searching for a biological Rosetta stone that would allow them to engineer proteins with precision, but the problem has remained dauntingly complex.  Researchers had a pretty good understanding of the very simple way that the linear chemical code carried by strands of DNA translates into strings of amino acids in proteins. 
    But, one of the main problems in protein engineering has to do with the way proteins fold into their various three-dimensional structures. Until recently, no one has been able to decipher the rules that will predict how proteins fold into those three-dimensional structures.  So even if researchers were somehow able to design a protein with the right shape for a given job, they wouldn’t know how to go about making it from protein’s building blocks, the amino acids.
    But now, scientists like William DeGrado, a chemist at the University of California, San Francisco, and David Baker, director for the Institute for Protein Design at the University of Washington, say that designing proteins will become at least as important as manipulating DNA has been in the past couple of decades.
    After making slow, but incremental progress over the years, scientists have improved their ability to decipher the complex language of protein shapes. Among other things, they’ve gained a better understanding of how then the laws of physics cause the proteins to snap into folded origami-like structures based on the ways amino acids are attracted or repelled by others many places down the chain.
    It is this new ability to decipher the complex language of protein shapes that has fueled their progress. UCSF’s DeGrado is using these new breakthroughs to search for new medicines that will be more stable, both on the shelf and in the body. He is also looking for new ways to treat Alzheimer’s disease and similar neurological conditions, which result when brain proteins fold incorrectly and create toxic deposits.
    Meanwhile, Baker’s is working on a single vaccine that would protect against all strains of the influenza virus, along with a method for breaking down the gluten proteins in wheat, which could help to generate new treatments for people with celiac disease. 
    With new computing power, look for progress on the understanding, design, and construction of brain proteins. As understanding, design and construction improve, look for brain proteins to play a major role in disease research and treatment. This is all great news for people looking to improve our understanding and treatment of celiac disease.
    Source:
    Bloomberg.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/21/2018 - Just a year ago, Starbucks debuted their Canadian bacon, egg and cheddar cheese gluten-free sandwich. During that year, the company basked in praise from customers with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivity for their commitment to delivering a safe gluten-free alternative to it’s standard breakfast offerings.
    But that commitment came to an ignoble end recently as Starbucks admitted that their gluten-free sandwich was plagued by  “low sales,” and was simply not sustainable from a company perspective. The sandwich may not have sold well, but it was much-loved by those who came to rely on it.
    With the end of that sandwich came the complaints. Customers on social media were anything but quiet, as seen in numerous posts, tweets and comments pointing out the callous and tone-deaf nature of the announcement which took place in the middle of national Celiac Disease Awareness Month. More than a few posts threatened to dump Starbucks altogether.
    A few of the choice tweets include the following:  
    “If I’m going to get coffee and can’t eat anything might as well be DD. #celiac so your eggbites won’t work for me,” tweeted @NotPerryMason. “They’re discontinuing my @Starbucks gluten-free sandwich which is super sad, but will save me money because I won’t have a reason to go to Starbucks and drop $50 a week,” tweeted @nwillard229. Starbucks is not giving up on gluten-free entirely, though. The company will still offer several items for customers who prefer gluten-free foods, including Sous Vide Egg Bites, a Marshmallow Dream Bar and Siggi’s yogurt.
    Stay tuned to learn more about Starbucks gluten-free foods going forward.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/19/2018 - Looking for a nutritious, delicious meal that is both satisfying and gluten-free? This tasty quinoa salad is just the thing for you. Easy to make and easy to transport to work. This salad of quinoa and vegetables gets a rich depth from chicken broth, and a delicious tang from red wine vinegar. Just pop it in a container, seal and take it to work or school. Make the quinoa a day or two ahead as needed. Add or subtract veggies as you like.
    Ingredients:
    1 cup red quinoa, rinsed well ½ cup water ½ cup chicken broth 2 radishes, thinly sliced 1 small bunch fresh pea sprouts 1 small Persian cucumber, diced 1 small avocado, ripe, sliced into chunks Cherry or grape tomatoes Fresh sunflower seeds 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar  Kosher salt, freshly ground pepper Directions:
    Simmer quinoa in water and chicken broth until tender.
    Dish into bowls.
    Top with veggies, salt and pepper, and sunflower seeds. 
    Splash with red wine vinegar and enjoy!

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/18/2018 - Across the country, colleges and universities are rethinking the way they provide food services for students with food allergies and food intolerance. In some cases, that means major renovations. In other cases, it means creating completely new dining and food halls. To document both their commitment and execution of gluten-free and allergen-free dining, these new food halls are frequently turning to auditing and accreditation firms, such as Kitchens with Confidence.
    The latest major player to make the leap to allergen-free dining is Syracuse University. The university’s Food Services recently earned an official gluten-free certification from Kitchens with Confidence for four of the University’s dining centers, with the fifth soon to follow.
    To earn the gluten-free certification from Kitchens with Confidence, food services must pass a 41 point audit process that includes 200 control check points. The food service must also agree to get any new food item approved in advance, and to submit to monthly testing of prep surfaces, to furnish quarterly reports, and to provide information on any staffing changes, recalls or incident reports. Kitchens with Confidence representatives also conduct annual inspections of each dining center.
    Syracuse students and guests eating at Ernie Davis, Shaw, Graham and Sadler dining centers can now choose safe, reliable gluten-free food from a certified gluten-free food center. The fifth dining center, Brockway, is currently undergoing renovations scheduled for completion by fall, when Brockway will also receive its certification.
    Syracuse Food Services has offered a gluten-free foods in its dining centers for years. According to Jamie Cyr, director of Auxiliary Services, the university believes that the independent Gluten-Free Certification from Kitchens with Confidence will help ease the anxiety for parents and students.”
    Syracuse is understandably proud of their accomplishment. According to Mark Tewksbury, director of residence dining operations, “campus dining centers serve 11,000 meals per day and our food is made fresh daily. Making sure that it is nutritious, delicious and safe for all students is a top priority.”
    Look for more colleges and universities to follow in the footsteps of Syracuse and others that have made safe, reliable food available for their students with food allergies or sensitivities.
    Read more.

    Zyana Morris
    Celiac.com 05/17/2018 - Celiac disease is not one of the most deadly diseases out there, but it can put you through a lot of misery. Also known as coeliac, celiac disease is an inherited immune disorder. What happens is that your body’s immune system overreacts to gluten and damages the small intestine. People who suffer from the disease cannot digest gluten, a protein found in grain such as rye, barley, and wheat. 
    While it may not sound like a severe complication at first, coeliac can be unpleasant to deal with. What’s worse is it would lower your body’s capacity to absorb minerals and vitamins. Naturally, the condition would cause nutritional deficiencies. The key problem that diagnosing celiac is difficult and takes take longer than usual. Surprisingly, the condition has over 200 identified symptoms.
    More than three million people suffer from the coeliac disease in the United States alone. Even though diagnosis is complicated, there are symptoms that can help you identify the condition during the early stages to minimize the damage. 
    Here is how you can recognize the main symptoms of celiac disease:
    Diarrhea
    In various studies conducted over years, the most prominent symptom of celiac disease is chronic diarrhea.
    People suffering from the condition would experience loose watery stools that can last for up to four weeks after they stop taking gluten. Diarrhea can also be a symptom of food poisoning and other conditions, which is why it makes it difficult to diagnose coeliac. In certain cases, celiac disease can take up to four years to establish a sound diagnosis.
    Vomiting
    Another prominent symptom is vomiting.  
    When accompanied by diarrhea, vomiting can be a painful experience that would leave you exhausted. It also results in malnutrition and the patient experiences weight loss (not in a good way though). If you experience uncontrolled vomiting, report the matter to a physician to manage the condition.
    Bloating
    Since coeliac disease damages the small intestine, bloating is another common system. This is due to inflammation of the digestive tract. In a study with more than a 1,000 participants, almost 73% of the people reported bloating after ingesting gluten. 
    Bloating can be managed by eliminating gluten from the diet which is why a gluten-free diet is necessary for people suffering from celiac disease.
    Fatigue
    Constant feeling of tiredness and low energy levels is another common symptom associated with celiac disease. If you experience a lack of energy after in taking gluten, then you need to consult a physician to diagnose the condition. Now fatigue can also result from inefficient thyroid function, infections, and depression (a symptom of the coeliac disease). However, almost 51% of celiac patients suffer from fatigue in a study.
    Itchy Rash
    Now the chances of getting a rash after eating gluten are slim, but the symptom has been associated with celiac disease in the past. The condition can cause dermatitis herpetiformis, which causes a blistering skin rash that occurs around the buttocks, knees, and elbows. 
    A study found out that almost 17% of patients suffering from celiac disease might develop dermatitis herpetiformis due to lack of right treatment. Make sure you schedule an online appointment with your dermatologist or visit the nearest healthcare facility to prevent worsening of symptoms.
    Even with such common symptoms, diagnosing the condition is imperative for a quick recovery and to mitigate the long-term risks associated with celiac disease. 
    Sources:
    ncbi.nlm.nih.gov  Celiac.com ncbi.nlm.nih.gov  mendfamily.com