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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/07/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    GLUTEN-FREE GROCERY STORE BREAD REVIEWED


    Maria Lerario


    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Summer 2015 Issue - Originally published July 16, 2015


    Celiac.com 11/17/2015 - For most people, when they think of gluten, the first thing that comes to mind is bread. And for most people with celiac or a gluten sensitivity, that is what we miss most.


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    While people with celiac or gluten sensitivity may never be able to experience the wide selection or soft texture that "glutenous" bread offers, there are still some tasty gluten-free bread options available at most grocery stores. In order to find the best gluten-free bread options, I went to my local Giant Eagle and tried all of the gluten-free bread available and explored four main aspects: taste, texture, price, and variety.

    The three brands of gluten-free bread offered at Giant Eagle were Schar, Udi's, and Goodbye Gluten.

    In the variety category, Udi's offered the largest selection of bread with the choice of white bread, multigrain bread, cinnamon raisin bread, and millet-chia bread and omega flax and fiber bread. Udi's also offers a large variety of other products ranging from muffins and cookies, to pizza crusts and tortillas.

    While Udi's may have the largest variety of the three brands, Schar offered a few different kinds of bread as well, with a cinnamon raisin and multigrain option along with an assortment of rolls.

    In the category of price, Goodbye Gluten came in as the most inexpensive per ounce at $0.27 per ounce. Udi's was in the middle $0.37 per oz. and Schar was the most expensive of the three, coming in at $0.40 per oz.

    Now let's get down to business. Taste and texture—the two aspects that are hardest to get right when making gluten-free bread. In my opinion, Udi's won both categories with the tastiness, most normal textured bread. My only critique was the slices of bread weren't big enough! All three brands seemed to have their slices of bread on the smaller side, but Udi's bread seemed to be especially small.

    Although Udi's took the first prize in three of the four categories, that is not to say the other two brands were not good. I was impressed with all three brands, but my main critique covers the texture category.

    The Goodbye Gluten bread seemed to be very dense, and while most gluten-free bread crumbles more than normal, I felt that the Goodbye Gluten loaf broke easier than the other two. However, it was very moist, something that is hard to come by in gluten-free bread.

    With the Schar bread, I felt that it was a little dry and grainy rather than moist and chewy like normal gluten filled bread. However, I found that when I toasted the bread, it had a texture more consistent with normal toast.

    Overall, I was satisfied with all three brands, but Udi's was the favorite. With the texture and taste being spot on, I did not need much else to convince me, but the added bonus of the reasonable price and large variety made it the most desirable gluten-free bread available.


    Image Caption: Image: CC--Rami Malkawi
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    If you have an Aldi's store in your area, they have a very good gluten free bread and the price is very good. Their gluten free wraps are also good and reasonably priced.

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    Guest C. Gioia

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    I think Canyon Bakehouse breads are far superior to the three breads that were mentioned in the article. Also, King Arthur Flour makes a gluten-free bread mix that is easy to use if you don't mind baking.

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    Guest Rosalyn

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    I disagree. Overall Schar is the best, especially their artisanal bread which is found on the shelf and not in the freezer area.

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    Sayer Ji
    Approximately 70% of all American calories come from a combination of the following four foods: wheat, dairy, soy and corn - assuming, that is, we exclude calories from sugar.
    Were it true that these four foods were health promoting, whole-wheat-bread-munching, soy-milk-guzzling, cheese-nibbling, corn-chip having Americans would probably be experiencing exemplary health among the world's nations. To the contrary, despite the massive amount of calories ingested from these purported "health foods," we are perhaps the most malnourished and sickest people on the planet today. The average American adult is on 12 prescribed medications, demonstrating just how diseased, or for that matter, brainwashed and manipulated, we are.
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    Unfortunately these “authoritative” recommendations go  much further in serving the special interests of the industries that produce these commodities than in serving the biological needs of those who are told it would be beneficial to consume them.  After all, grains themselves have only been consumed for 500 generations – that is, only since the transition out of the Paleolithic into the Neolithic era approximately 10,000 years ago.  Since the advent of homo sapiens 2.5 million years ago our bodies have survived on a hunter and gatherer diet, where foods were consumed in whole form, and raw!  Corn, Soy and Cow's Milk have only just been introduced into our diet, and therefore are “experimental” food sources which given the presence of toxic lectins, endocrine disruptors, anti-nutrients, enzyme inhibitors, indigestible gluey proteins, etc, don’t appear to make much biological sense to consume in large quantities - and perhaps, as is my belief, given their deleterious effects on health, they should not be consumed at all.
    Even if our belief system doesn’t allow for the concept of evolution, or that our present existence is borne on vast stretches of biological time, we need only consider the undeniable fact that these four “health foods” are also sources for industrial adhesives, in order to see how big a problem they present.
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    Of all four suspect foods Wheat, whose omnipresence in the S.A.D or Standard American Diet indicates something of an obsession, may be the primary culprit.  According to Clinical Pathologist Carolyn Pierini the wheat lectin called "gliadin" is known to to participate in activating NF kappa beta proteins which are involved in every acute and chronic inflammatory disorder including neurodegenerative disease, inflammatory bowel disease, infectious and autoimmune diseases.
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    Wheat and Dairy contain gliadorphin and gluten exorphins, and casomorphin, respectively.  These partially digested proteins known as peptides act on the opioid receptors in the brain, generating a temporary euphoria or analgesic effect that has been clinically documented and measured in great detail.  The Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology in Magdeburg, Germany has shown that a Casein (cow's milk protein) derivative has 1000 times greater antinociceptive activity (pain inhibition) than morphine. Not only do these morphine like substances create a painkilling "high," but they can invoke serious addictive/obsessive behavior, learning disabilities, autism, inability to focus, and other serious physical and mental handicaps. 
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    Melissa Blanco
    This article originally appeared in the Fall 2009 edition of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.
    Celiac.com 12/11/2009 - I recently embarked on a quest for family-friendly restaurants that offered gluten-free selections.  I explained this vision to my husband and three children as we set the rules of our experiment: five family members to eat at five restaurants during a five week period.  The challenge - the children were to choose the restaurant, the chosen restaurant couldn’t sell Happy Meals or have a drive-thru window and the restaurant had to be a franchise rather than a local venue.  Additionally, the mom, me, and the only celiac in the family, had the option of not eating if it might compromise her small intestines.  Here is what we discovered:
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    My children chose to eat at Applebee’s on a Sunday afternoon for lunch.  The atmosphere was friendly and a plentiful kids’ menu was offered.  With over 1900 restaurants nationwide and in 15 other countries, according to the company website, it seems there is an Applebee’s almost everywhere.  Additionally, Applebee’s offers a Weight Watcher’s menu for restaurant patrons who are counting points, which led me to hope an allergy/gluten-free menu would also be provided.
    After we were seated, I perused the menu to read this statement, “To our guests with food sensitivities or allergies.  Applebee’s cannot ensure that menu items do not contain ingredients that might cause an allergic reaction.  Please consider this when ordering.”
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    Restaurant #2: Red Robin
    The next stop on our restaurant expedition was Red Robin, which also offers an extensive children’s menu.  According to the company website, there are over 430 Red Robin restaurants, in North America.  After we were seated in our booth, I asked our server if a gluten-free menu was available.  She immediately went to the kitchen and returned with a printed Wheat/Gluten Allergen menu.  Printed on the top of the menu was the statement, “Red Robin relied on our suppliers’ statements of ingredients in deciding which products did not contain certain allergens.  Suppliers may change the ingredients in their products or the way they prepare their products, so please check this list to make sure that the menu item you like still meets your dietary requirements.  Red Robin cannot guarantee that any menu item will be prepared completely free of the allergen in question.”
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    Restaurant #4:  The Old Spaghetti Factory
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    Each entré includes complimentary salad, bread, and ice cream. Obviously, those with gluten intolerance need to give the bread a pass, but there are viable options available for the remainder of the meal.  Gluten-free salad dressings include pesto and vinaigrette—hold the croutons on the salad.  The main course is a rice pasta with the following sauce choices: marinara; meat; mushroom; mizithra cheese, and; brown butter.  Diners also have the option of adding gluten-free sausage and sliced chicken breast to their meal.  For dessert, a choice of spumoni or vanilla ice cream is offered. 
     I ordered the Manager’s Favorite pasta, which includes a combination of two sauces.  I chose gluten-free pasta topped with marinara sauce and mizithra cheese.  My dinner also included a salad with vinaigrette dressing and spumoni for dessert. 
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    Our final dining choice was the Outback Steakhouse which, according to the company’s website, is an Australian Steakhouse with over 950 locations worldwide.  I was offered a gluten-free menu that is nearly as large as the main menu.  Offerings included appetizers, steaks, chicken, seafood, salads, side dishes, and even a brownie dessert.  The entire gluten-free menu is available on the Outback Steakhouse website, www.outback.com .
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    Overall, our experiment was a great success with four of the five restaurants we visited offering gluten-free menus.  I advise diners to be cautious wherever they eat because even if a company offers gluten-free options you must also take into account the knowledge of the chef preparing your food and the server assisting you.  It is encouraging that major restaurant chains are acknowledging the need to modify their menus for those suffering from gluten intolerance.  Good luck and happy dining.


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 12/10/2009 - A UK mother-turned-entrepreneur is about to notch the one-million loaf sales mark for the gluten-free bread she invented to help her sons’ food allergies.  Launched by Lucinda Bruce-Gardyne in April, Genius bread originally made its debut exclusively at British supermarket giant Tesco, which had just debuted its "Free From" line of products.
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 12/11/2009 - Happy Holidays, gluten-free food lovers! Our readers enjoyed the Thanksgiving edition of Celiac.com's Gluten-free Holiday Guide so much that we've decided to provide even more gluten-free food for thought as the holidays kick into high gear!Once again, the basic message is the same: With a little of planning and a few tips, anyone with celiac disease or gluten intolerance can enjoy safe,delicious gluten-free foods, treats, and baked goods this holiday season without worrying about accidental gluten consumption.
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    Gluten-free Gift Ideas
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    For those who like to stay abreast of the latest research on celiac disease and gluten intolerance, may we suggest the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

    Books on gluten-free living, diet, recipes and other issues make great holiday gifts. This season, celiac.com suggests Elisabeth Hasselbeck's gluten-free DietRemember, gluten-free personal body care products and gluten-free gift vouchers make great for your gluten-free loved ones.
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    Yvonne (Vonnie) Mostat
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    Dedicated Facilities that Produce Gluten-free Oats
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    Avenin Foods
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    Ice Cream Slip Up
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    Double Check these Foods
    Imitation Sea Foods, such as imitation crab meat, imitation bacon bits, licorice, flavored coffees and teas, processed foods, some chocolates and bars, salad dressings, hot dogs, sausages, deli-meats, sauces, marinades, seasonings, and soy sauce.
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    Do what I did, take the form provided by the National Celiac Association for Pharmacists to your pharmacy and tell them you are either a celiac or gluten sensitive and ask them to find out if your medications contain gluten.
    Gluten-Free Oats
    The Gluten Free Watchdog supports the use of gluten-free oats by the celiac disease community that are produced under a purity protocol. At this time we do not support the use of regular oats that are cleaned at the "end" of production via mechanical and/or optical sorting to be "gluten free". Before we can support the use of oats "cleaned" in this manner to be gluten-free we must be provided with thorough testing data. We can then compare this data to the thorough testing data provided to us for oats grown under a purity protocol."
    The Gluten Free Watchdog, who work very hard to keep pushing companies with regards to the safety of oats, had a meeting with General Mills in July to discuss gluten-free Cheerios. Those involved with testing of the oats in Cheerios—Medallion Labs were also present. Marshall Gluten Free Milling and Pro-Cert, (Michael Marshall, President and CEO of Marshall Gluten Free Milling (www.glutenfreemilling.com) sent the Gluten Free Watchdog a letter indicating that they knew it was time to make a difference in a segment of the marketplace that needs some help. What does Marshall Gluten Free Milling do? They are the world's first company that provides ingredients to manufacturers that are produced on third party Certified Gluten Free FARMS by Pro-Cert a worldwide leader in third party organic certification.
    It is a program that closely mirrors organic certification. Each farm must be free from gluten-containing products for two full years and on the third year of production the crops can be marketed. No gluten-containing product can be stored, handled, transported or conveyed with any infrastructure or equipment on the farm. Marshall gluten-free Milling Staff then control the dedicated trucking to a gluten-free only certified cleaning facility where the product is cleaned and sized to maximize quality. The oats are then shipped in a dedicated gluten-free truck to a third party certified gluten-free mill (GFCO, Pro-Cert, etc.). So the mill, cleaner and farm are all certified. The crops available right now on this program are organic oats and flax. Interest has spread to non-organic producers as well. They are expanding their offerings to lentils, peas and possibly quinoa. They need a sustainable crop rotation for the producers in the program. Primarily right now the focus of their ingredient marketing is oats as this is where the 3rd party certification of the farm is most crucial to developing a sustainable gluten-free crop rotation.
    Michael Marshall was asked about General Mills announcing that five varieties of Cheerios were to be labeled gluten-free. The company is using regular oats cleaned at the "end" of production via mechanical separation. According to General Mills there are not enough oats grown under a purity protocol to produce Cheerios. He was asked, based on his industry experience, did he feel that mechanical/optical sorting was sufficient to ensure the gluten-free status of oats. He stated that General Mills was a trusted brand who value their name, and have done their homework on the process. But he also stated that mechanical and optical sorting equipment has been used for quality control for years as well as for food safety precautions. It is not new idea, has come a long way, but he thinks that even General Mills would have to agree it does not reduce the risk to zero. Michael Marshall is concerned about the dust control system used by General Mills. In his opinion, contaminated conventional low cost oats in gluten-free foods is risky.
    After Tricia Thompson of the Gluten Free Watchdog asked if his program guaranteed 100% pure gluten-free oats? He said, "Generally speaking, there are always going to be anomalies." However if you look at the protocols in our program there are standard operating procedures in place. These procedures include: Planting seeds that are verified pure. Using only gluten-free planting equipment. Using buffer strips around the field – At harvest, the crop within the buffer strip cannot be binned with the gluten-free product—this protects the gluten-free crop from outside contamination. Strip testing every load that comes off the field before it is binned. Sending a representing sample from every bin to the lab for testing using the R5ELISA R7001 assay (testing prior to the crop being shipped to the mill. Testing at the mill before the crop is unloaded. The bottom line being they are testing at various steps to find gluten through the entire production of the crop to mitigate or eliminate the risk of contamination before it even gets to the mill. Once at the mill hi-tech sorting or mechanical separation will be for quality versus the only fail-safe measure to assure removal of gluten. The farm will be required to be certified gluten-free by Pro-Cert. They have 25,000 acres of both organic and conventional farmland under the certification program that will be available for the market this October. There are farmers lining up to get on the program and they have not even marketed it yet. It is a big market to supply and I believe we can all benefit.
    Of course they want to follow safety guidelines! The celiac population is big business and I thank the Gluten Free Watchdog for working to develop a safety protocol for oats and working hard to obtain purity so that we can safely eat food without getting sick. But I know there will be a price to be paid for purity and safety, and it has to be passed on to the consumer, and I think there should be more tax breaks for the celiac population. AND, that is another place that the Gluten Free Watchdog and FALCPA (Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004) can help us with keeping the costs down. No-one should have to be penalized out of their pocketbook for having a gluten sensitivity or severe gluten allergy.
    My goodness, in Great Britain tax breaks are considerable for anyone who has diabetes, celiac disease or many notable food allergies. They do not decide that you have to use a certain medication, a generic brand, because the brand prescribed by your doctor is not listed under Pharmacare like they do in British Columbia, and, in Great Britain, as soon as a woman becomes pregnant she receives free vitamins for her unborn baby and all costs during her pregnancy are covered by their Medical Insurance Coverage. Dental, glasses, and money for diapers and a clothing allowance for the first three months of the babies life are paid for. We in the United States and Canada are so far behind Europe and the Great Britain in our health coverage. I think as a celiac and somone who has multiple allergies that require severe diets, some assistance and tax adjustments should be available more than the paltry difficult to monitor cost adjustment program that is in place today in our two countries! I know, my "Bandwagon", but one you should get on board too, and so should the NFCA.

    Amie  Valpone
    Celiac.com 04/05/2016 - These fresh-tasting burgers make an easy weeknight meal. No buns here; you can serve these wrapped in romaine or Bibb lettuce leaves and eat them with your hands. Make sure your millet isn't too dry or the burgers won't stick together!
    Serves 6
    Ingredients:
    1 cup millet ½ teaspoon sea salt, plus a pinch for cooking millet 1 tablespoon ground flax seeds 3 tablespoons water 1 large carrot, peeled and grated 4 scallions, thinly sliced 1 handful fresh basil leaves, finely chopped 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice 2 ½ teaspoons freshly grated lemon zest ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 3 tablespoons coconut oil 6 large romaine or Bibb lettuce leaves 1 recipe Mango Salsa, for serving Large drizzle Cumin Cashew Cream Sauce, for serving Directions:
    Cook the millet with a pinch of salt. Set aside to cool.
    Combine the flax seeds and water in a small bowl; set aside for 10 minutes until the mixture forms a gel, then mix well.
    While the millet is cooking, combine the carrots, scallions, basil, lemon juice, lemon zest, salt, and pepper in a large bowl. Once the millet is cool, add it to the bowl with the flax seed mixture and mix well. Using your hands, shape the mixture into six burgers.
    In a large skillet, heat the oil over medium heat. Place the burgers in the pan and cook until golden brown, 7 to 8 minutes on each side. Serve warm wrapped in lettuce leaves with a dollop of Mango Salsa and a drizzle of Cumin Cashew Cream Sauce on top. Uncooked burgers will keep for up to 4 days in the refrigerator or 1 month in the freezer, stored between pieces of parchment paper in a sealed container.
    Mango Salsa
    Makes 1 ½ cups
    Ingredients:
    1 ripe mango, peeled, pitted, and finely diced 1 medium English cucumber, finely diced 3 tablespoons finely diced red onion 3 teaspoons finely chopped fresh cilantro 2 teaspoons freshly squeezed lime juice Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste Directions:
    Combine all of the ingredients in a large bowl; toss to combine, and serve. Add more red onion, if desired, for a spicier salsa. Serve immediately.
    Cumin Cashew Cream Sauce
    Makes 1 ½ cups
    Ingredients:
    1 cup raw cashews
    ¾ cup water
    ¼ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
    ½ teaspoon ground cumin
    ¼ teaspoon sea salt
    Directions:
    Combine all of the ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth. Serve chilled or at room temperature. Store leftover sauce in a sealed container in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.
    Text excerpted from EATING CLEAN, © 2016 by AMIE VALPONE. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. Author/Recipe photo © LAUREN VOLO.

    Sarah  Curcio
    Celiac.com 07/22/2016 - Some of us have the luxury of living in a household that is completely dedicated to being gluten-free. However, many of us don't have that luxury. So, there are certain precautions you must take, in order to avoid cross contamination.
    Now, here is a list of helpful tips to keep in mind for your kitchen:
    Always wear gloves or wash your hands thoroughly, especially if you have dermatitis herpetiformis (DH), when you are wiping down counter tops, tables and stove tops. Using paper towels would be a beneficial because you can throw it directly in the trash. As for hand towels, have a separate one for your hands. Having a dishwasher or even a counter top dishwasher, if possible, reduces your worries. Otherwise, be sure to have different sponges when washing because they are very porous and absorbs gluten. For your kitchenware, having glass, metal, stainless steel and ceramic would be best because plastic and wood absorb gluten as well. Just think about your flour sifters, colanders and cutting boards. As for appliances, have separate toasters, baking mixers, convection ovens, blenders, etc. Keep cabinets and refrigerator shelves separate, especially from foods like cakes, cookies, breads and crackers. Basically, anything that can cause a lot of crumbs. Also keep your flours and wheat flours in labeled, air tight containers, so they are completely sealed shut. You do not want flour flying everywhere. When reheating your food, cover all your plates in the microwave. Lastly, if you are following all of these instructions correctly and consistently, your celiac disease should stay under control. However, it might be best if you get your antibody levels tested at least once or twice a year by your gastrointestinal (GI) physician. That way you can see, in black and white, that all your antibodies are in range. That will prove you're keeping yourself perfectly healthy.
    References:
    http://strengthandsunshine.com/the-quick-dirty-guide-to-cross-contamination-prevention/ http://www.theceliacdiva.com/10-tips-to-prevent-cross-contamination/

    Miranda Jade
    Celiac.com 10/06/2016 - You do not need to be celiac to need to stay away from gluten. Wheat isn't just harmful to celiac or gluten-sensitive individuals. Did you know that just one slice of wheat bread raises one's blood sugar higher than 3 teaspoons of table sugar? That is equivalent to 12 grams of sugar! Talk about diabetes waiting to happen!
    I am very diligent in reading over even the gluten–free ingredients of products to ensure they are indeed gluten-free. I decided to start grabbing items off of the shelf to read the other listed ingredients as well. Wow, was I surprised! Sugar, high fructose corn syrup, corn syrup, fructose etc.! Sweetener and especially sugar are added to so many things; it is really horrible. No wonder Americans are addicted to it. We have many new diagnoses and physical disorders stemming from the standard American Diet, the "improper diet", not to mention a rapid rise in obesity statistics and diagnosed diabetes.
    Americans love bread, gluten-free or not. Go to a restaurant and what is the first thing brought to the table? Bread! Can you imagine being brought some cut up cucumbers and celery instead? Now THAT would be a nice change! I often ask for this by the way and suggest you do as well.
    Kids products are the worst! To give a tiny or growing body with a rapidly developing brain that needs proper nutrition all that junk, additives and unhealthy ingredient are a crime. If your child has been having trouble focusing in school, I highly advise you to look at the ingredients list of the food and snacks he or she eats and check out the children's menu at a restaurant. Gluten-free foods as well.
    You may not have any issues with gluten and wheat type bread but it is harming your body in one way or another and I strongly advise you to stay away from it and keep your family off of it too. I also highly suggest you start being diligent and read your gluten-free product's ingredients list. Going gluten-free is the first step as a diagnosed celiac or one who is gluten intolerant, but getting healthier or staying healthy is of utmost importance to a long and healthy lifestyle. Your body's future is in your hands.

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/23/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to learn whether celiac disease patients commonly suffer cognitive impairment at the time they are diagnosed, and to compare their cognitive performance with non-celiac subjects with similar chronic symptoms and to a group of healthy control subjects.
    The research team included G Longarini, P Richly, MP Temprano, AF Costa, H Vázquez, ML Moreno, S Niveloni, P López, E Smecuol, R Mazure, A González, E Mauriño, and JC Bai. They are variously associated with the Small Bowel Section, Department of Medicine, Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital; Neurocience Cognitive and Traslational Institute (INECO), Favaloro Fundation, CONICET, Buenos Aires; the Brain Health Center (CESAL), Quilmes, Argentina; the Research Council, MSAL, CABA; and with the Research Institute, School of Medicine, Universidad del Salvador.
    The team enrolled fifty adults with symptoms and indications of celiac disease in a prospective cohort without regard to the final diagnosis.  At baseline, all individuals underwent cognitive functional and psychological evaluation. The team then compared celiac disease patients with subjects without celiac disease, and with healthy controls matched by sex, age, and education.
    Celiac disease patients had similar cognitive performance and anxiety, but no significant differences in depression scores compared with disease controls.
    A total of thirty-three subjects were diagnosed with celiac disease. Compared with the 26 healthy control subjects, the 17 celiac disease subjects, and the 17 disease control subjects, who mostly had irritable bowel syndrome, showed impaired cognitive performance (P=0.02 and P=0.04, respectively), functional impairment (P<0.01), and higher depression (P<0.01). 
    From their data, the team noted that any abnormal cognitive functions they saw in adults with newly diagnosed celiac disease did not seem not to be a result of the disease itself. 
    Their results indicate that cognitive dysfunction in celiac patients could be related to long-term symptoms from chronic disease, in general.
    Source:
    J Clin Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 1. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0000000000001018.

    Connie Sarros
    Celiac.com 04/21/2018 - Dear Friends and Readers,
    I have been writing articles for Scott Adams since the 2002 Summer Issue of the Scott-Free Press. The Scott-Free Press evolved into the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. I felt honored when Scott asked me ten years ago to contribute to his quarterly journal and it's been a privilege to write articles for his publication ever since.
    Due to personal health reasons and restrictions, I find that I need to retire. My husband and I can no longer travel the country speaking at conferences and to support groups (which we dearly loved to do) nor can I commit to writing more books, articles, or menus. Consequently, I will no longer be contributing articles to the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. 
    My following books will still be available at Amazon.com:
    Gluten-free Cooking for Dummies Student's Vegetarian Cookbook for Dummies Wheat-free Gluten-free Dessert Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Reduced Calorie Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Cookbook for Kids and Busy Adults (revised version) My first book was published in 1996. My journey since then has been incredible. I have met so many in the celiac community and I feel blessed to be able to call you friends. Many of you have told me that I helped to change your life – let me assure you that your kind words, your phone calls, your thoughtful notes, and your feedback throughout the years have had a vital impact on my life, too. Thank you for all of your support through these years.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/20/2018 - A digital media company and a label data company are teaming up to help major manufacturers target, reach and convert their desired shoppers based on dietary needs, such as gluten-free diet. The deal could bring synergy in emerging markets such as the gluten-free and allergen-free markets, which represent major growth sectors in the global food industry. 
    Under the deal, personalized digital media company Catalina will be joining forces with Label Insight. Catalina uses consumer purchases data to target shoppers on a personal base, while Label Insight works with major companies like Kellogg, Betty Crocker, and Pepsi to provide insight on food label data to government, retailers, manufacturers and app developers.
    "Brands with very specific product benefits, gluten-free for example, require precise targeting to efficiently reach and convert their desired shoppers,” says Todd Morris, President of Catalina's Go-to-Market organization, adding that “Catalina offers the only purchase-based targeting solution with this capability.” 
    Label Insight’s clients include food and beverage giants such as Unilever, Ben & Jerry's, Lipton and Hellman’s. Label Insight technology has helped the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) build the sector’s very first scientifically accurate database of food ingredients, health attributes and claims.
    Morris says the joint partnership will allow Catalina to “enhance our dataset and further increase our ability to target shoppers who are currently buying - or have shown intent to buy - in these emerging categories,” including gluten-free, allergen-free, and other free-from foods.
    The deal will likely make for easier, more precise targeting of goods to consumers, and thus provide benefits for manufacturers and retailers looking to better serve their retail food customers, especially in specialty areas like gluten-free and allergen-free foods.
    Source:
    fdfworld.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/19/2018 - Previous genome and linkage studies indicate the existence of a new disease triggering mechanism that involves amino acid metabolism and nutrient sensing signaling pathways. In an effort to determine if amino acids might play a role in the development of celiac disease, a team of researchers recently set out to investigate if plasma amino acid levels differed among children with celiac disease compared with a control group.
     
    The research team included Åsa Torinsson Naluai, Ladan Saadat Vafa, Audur H. Gudjonsdottir, Henrik Arnell, Lars Browaldh, and Daniel Agardh. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Karolinska University Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institute, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Diabetes & Celiac Disease Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; and with the Nathan S Kline Institute in the U.S.A.
    First, the team used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to analyze amino acid levels in fasting plasma samples from 141 children with celiac disease and 129 non-celiac disease controls. They then crafted a general linear model using age and experimental effects as covariates to compare amino acid levels between children with celiac disease and non-celiac control subjects.
    Compared with the control group, seven out of twenty-three children with celiac disease showed elevated levels of the the following amino acids: tryptophan; taurine; glutamic acid; proline; ornithine; alanine; and methionine.
    The significance of the individual amino acids do not survive multiple correction, however, multivariate analyses of the amino acid profile showed significantly altered amino acid levels in children with celiac disease overall and after correction for age, sex and experimental effects.
    This study shows that amino acids can influence inflammation and may play a role in the development of celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/18/2018 - To the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service animals.
    If you’ve flown anywhere lately, you may have seen them. People flying with their designated “emotional support” animals. We’re not talking genuine service animals, like seeing eye dogs, or hearing ear dogs, or even the Belgian Malinois that alerts its owner when there is gluten in food that may trigger her celiac disease.
    Now, to be honest, some of those animals in question do perform a genuine service for those who need emotional support dogs, like veterans with PTSD.
    However, many of these animals are not service animals at all. Many of these animals perform no actual service to their owners, and are nothing more than thinly disguised pets. Many lack proper training, and some have caused serious problems for the airlines and for other passengers.
    Now the major airlines are taking note and introducing stringent requirements for service animals.
    Delta was the first to strike. As reported by the New York Times on January 19: “Effective March 1, Delta, the second largest US airline by passenger traffic, said it will require passengers seeking to fly with pets to present additional documents outlining the passenger’s need for the animal and proof of its training and vaccinations, 48 hours prior to the flight.… This comes in response to what the carrier said was a 150 percent increase in service and support animals — pets, often dogs, that accompany people with disabilities — carried onboard since 2015.… Delta said that it flies some 700 service animals a day. Among them, customers have attempted to fly with comfort turkeys, gliding possums, snakes, spiders, and other unusual pets.”
    Fresh from an unsavory incident with an “emotional support” peacock incident, United Airlines has followed Delta’s lead and set stricter rules for emotional support animals. United’s rules also took effect March 1, 2018.
    So, to the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service and emotional support animals.
    Source:
    cnbc.com