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    New E-Book on the Horizon


    Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.
    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2012 Issue

    New E-Book on the Horizon
    Image Caption: Image: CC--Alan Levine

    Celiac.com 04/14/2018 - There is a revolutionary new book about gluten sensitivity and celiac disease, written by Dr. Gordon Heinrichs, D.C. (whose article appears in this issue). His careers as a medical laboratory technologist, then a chiropractor, have uniquely located him to see gluten's impact on health in an entirely new way. His book critiques relevant scientific explorations and discoveries and the ensuing clinical practices. Titled "Celiac Disease & Gluten Sensitivity: A troubled past, but a promising future", this exciting book is a breath of fresh air in the field of gluten sensitivity and celiac disease. Dr. Heinrichs' thoughtful analysis of relevant data combined with the application of practical common sense explodes some of the common medical myths that claim to distinguish gluten sensitivity from celiac disease. He also explores conventional wisdom around dietary experimentation, and offers a rational approach to diagnosing gluten sensitivity. 

    The evidence Heinrichs provides raises questions about the view that we should continue to eat gluten until we can visit a gastroenterologist and get a biopsy taken. He also challenges the belief that HLA analysis is beneficial for those who are aware that gluten causes some or all of their health problems. 

    After a preview of the final draft, I can confidently predict that anyone who is interested in thoughtful, objective, and health promoting insights into gluten's impact on human health will be intrigued and motivated by the offerings of this inexpensive, powerful new ebook. I recommend it without reservation. It is very well researched and written and is now available on Amazon. I hope it will become the new best seller among books that explore the gluten syndrome.

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  • About Me

    As co-author of "Dangerous Grains" and "Cereal Killers", the study of the impact of gluten continues to be a driving passion in my life. I am fascinated by the way that gluten induces illness and impedes learning while it alters mood, behavior, and a host of other facets of our existence. Sure, the impact of gluten on health is an important issue, but that is only the most obvious area of impact. Mood disturbances, learning disabilities, and the loss of quality of life due to psychiatric and neurological illness are even more tragic than the plethora of physical ailments that are caused or worsened by gluten. The further I go down this rabbit hole, the more I realize that grains are a good food for ruminants - not people. I am a retired school teacher. Over the last decade, I have done some college and university level teaching, but the bulk of my teaching career was spent working with high school students. My Web page is: www.DangerousGrains.com

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    Jefferson Adams
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