Jump to content
  • Sign Up
  • Join Our Community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Betty Wedman-St Louis, PhD, RD
    Betty Wedman-St Louis, PhD, RD

    Gluten-Free Cookie Exchanges

      Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2014 Issue

    Caption: Image: CC--Aniket Thakur

    Celiac.com 12/13/2016 - Cookie exchanges are fun social occasions but let's resolve to make cookies healthier next year. They don't need to be 7 layer high fat, high sugar indulgences that contribute to many chronic diseases like diabetes, high blood pressure, cardiovascular damage and dementia. Yes, high sugar is now identified as a major contributor to dementia and even has its own classification called Type 3 diabetes. As the levels of obesity and diabetes continue to generate headlines, emphasis on reducing sugar will continue to make news. Stevia now has a global market over $300 million as a sugar substitute but it continues to lag behind other sugar substitutes in the U.S. Stevia leaf has been valued for centuries throughout South America for its sweetening properties. It is about time Americans started using a healthier sugar substitute that the Japanese have enjoyed for decades.

    Using sugar substitutes like stevia, erythritol and xylitol can modify calories without sacrificing taste. These sweetening agents are better choices than the other sugar substitutes used in sugar-free foods.

    Whole grain gluten-free flours like hemp and quinoa provide more protein, fiber, calcium and iron than whole wheat so gluten-free cookies are healthier than conventional choices. These flours impart a nutty taste to delight any appetite. Quinoa is the Andean cereal that originated in the Ecuador, Bolivia, Columbia and Peru region of South America. Quinoa and hemp are both becoming increasingly popular throughout the United States and are available in most health food stores. What was once considered "peasant food" now sells for a higher price per pound than chicken! Quinoa flakes are easy to use in cookies, yogurt or soups for added protein and nutrients.

    Butter and coconut oil add the most calories to each cookie. Don't pay any attention to all those negative comments about saturated fat content of butter and coconut oil. There is no science to demonstrate they are unhealthy. Coconut oil is made unhealthy when hydrogen is added to the oil to make non-dairy cream or whipped toppings. Theron Randolph, M.D. described it best when he stated "analytical dietetics" (what can be assessed by a machine) is not "biological dietetics" (how food is used in your body).

    Many recipes and commercially baked products contain xanthan gum to make the dough more sticky. This recipe does not use of xanthan gum because it is derived from the fungus, xanthomonas campestris (the black mold on broccoli, cauliflower or leafy greens). This fungus is grown on corn, wheat, dairy or soy to produce the powder. Since no studies have been done about sensitivities to xanthan gum produced from these foods, anyone with sensitivities to these foods should limit or avoid products that do not state the source for the production of xanthan gum. Remember, it is a thickening agent that can be present in many foods like salad dressings, ice cream, egg substitute products, etc. As a thickener, xanthan gum is a very effective laxative

    This one basic cookie recipe can provide lots of variety for health snacks throughout the coming year. Cookies can provide a quick snack so numerous options mean healthy eating for everyone.

    Chocolate Chip Quinoa Cookies

    Ingredients:

    • 1/4 cup coconut oil
    • 1/2 cup butter or margarine
    • 3/4 cup Xylitol sweetener or 3 tablespoons stevia- erythritol sweetener
    • 2 eggs
    • 3/4 cup brown rice flour or hemp flour
    • 3/4 cup coconut flour
    • 1/4 teaspoon salt
    • 1 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
    • 1/2 cup quinoa flakes or hemp hearts
    • 1 cup (6 oz) chocolate baking chips
    • 2 tablespoons water

    Directions:
    Cream together coconut oil, butter, sweetener and eggs. Add rest of the ingredients and mix thoroughly. Drop by teaspoons onto lightly oiled baking sheet. Press down and bake in 350 degree oven 10-12 minutes, or until browned. Makes 3 dozen.

    To make Oatmeal Spice Cookies: add 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, 1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg and 1/8 teaspoon ground cloves instead of chocolate chips.

    To make Hemp Raisin Cookies: add 1/2 cup raisins instead of chocolate chips and use hemp flour

    To make Peanut Butter Cookies: add 1 cup peanut butter to creamed mixture. Top with chocolate chip, if desired.

    Calories per cookie: 158; Protein: 3 g; Carbohydrates: 16 g; Fat: 8 g, Sodium: 69 mg.



    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There is nothing "healthy" about this recipe. Substituting gluten free junk food for regular junk food, is still junk. It's not to say you can't have a treat now and then, but health food? Really! It has been shown that any artificial or alternative sweetener can raise insulin resistance by tricking the system into thinking it should release insulin in response to the endorphins released in your brain when you taste something sweet. Move along. Nothing to see here!

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    There is nothing "healthy" about this recipe. Substituting gluten free junk food for regular junk food, is still junk. It's not to say you can't have a treat now and then, but health food? Really! It has been shown that any artificial or alternative sweetener can raise insulin resistance by tricking the system into thinking it should release insulin in response to the endorphins released in your brain when you taste something sweet. Move along. Nothing to see here!

    Thank you health police...but this is about cookies!

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Join the conversation

    You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Betty Wedman-St Louis, PhD, RD is Assistant Professor, NY Chiropractic College, MS Clinical Nutrition Program Nutrition Assessment Course & Food Science Course.  She is author of the following books:

    • Fast and Simple Diabetes Menus, McGraw Hill Companies
    • Diabetes Meals on the Run, Contemporary Books
    • Living With Food Allergies, Contemporary Books
    • Diabetic Desserts, Contemporary Books
    • Quick & Easy Diabetes Menus Cookbook, Contemporary Books
    • American Diabetes Association Holiday Cookbook and Parties & Special Celebrations Cookbook, Prentice Hall Books

     

  • Related Articles

    Betty Wedman-St Louis, PhD, RD
    Celiac.com 12/01/2015 - Lectins are carbohydrate binding proteins which promote inflammatory responses like Crohn's disease, systemic lupus, asthma, and rheumatoid arthritis. They were discovered over 100 years ago and cause leaky gut and gastrointestinal dysbiosis yet the push for a plant-based diet focusing on legumes as meat alternatives has overlooked the damage lectins cause to the gut. Legumes offer inferior nutrition compared to animal proteins so toxicity needs to be considered when recommending food choices.
    As carbohydrate binding proteins, lectins are difficult to digest and irritate the brush border of the small intestine. Consequently, the tight junctions of the microvilli are damaged by prolamin and agglutinins which can lead to numerous disorders of the gastrointestinal tract and autoimmune diseases. Lectins are also a major contributor to leptin resistance which contributes to obesity.
    As described in The Handbook of Plant Lectins: Properties and Biomedical Applications (John Wiley, 1998), foods that contain these toxic lectins are members of the pea family and include peanuts, pigeon peas, soybeans, kidney beans, mung beans, lima beans, lentils, fava beans, chickpeas, carob, green and yellow peas. Green beans, snow peas and snap peas are usually well tolerated once the gut has been healed since they are immature protein sources with minor amounts of lectins.
    Lectins are found in other foods including grains and pseudo-grains. Grains are seeds from grasses—barley, oats, rice, rye, millet, wheat, teff, corn, kamut, spelt and possibly wild rice. Many gastroenterologists believe that the detrimental affects of lectins in grains are a factor in the development of celiac disease. Genetics and frequent consumption possibly play a critical role in the severity of sensitivities to these foods.
    Pseudo-grains are seeds from broadleafed plants—amaranth, buckwheat, chia, and quinoa. These seed products were geographically limited to specific populations and only available on a limited basis seasonally. But modern agriculture has greatly increased the consumption of these pseudo-grains because they can be labeled “gluten-free” because US standards allow any grain with less than 20 ppm gluten to be called gluten-free.
    Omitting toxic lectins—prolamins and agglutinins—from the diet is critical for gut health. Prolamins are predominately found in the seeds of plants. Gluten is the most widely known source of prolamins. They get their name from the high content of the amino acid proline. Research studies have shown that the prolamins in quinoa, corn and oats can cause damage to the digestive tract in people with celiac disease, yet these grains are frequently included in a gluten-free diet.
    Aggltinins are named for their ability to cause clumping of red blood cells. The most recent example of how this toxic lectin works is the bioterrorism threat caused from ricin. Ricin is the compound in castor beans that is so toxic that only tiny amounts are needed to cause death. Agglutinins are found on the seed coatings of grains and pseudo-grains and serve to protect the seed from fungus growth. Genetically modified crops—wheat, corn, soybeans—have higher amounts of agglutinins to insure higher yields.
    A leaky gut is harmful to the innate and adaptive immune systems. Toxic lectins cause inflammation and induce cytokine production. As few as five soaked, uncooked kidney beans can lead to gut distress for the raw foodies while 1 tablespoon of peanut butter leads to peanut agglutinins entering the bloodstream soon after consumption.
    Paolo Zatto and Pamela Zambenedetti from Padova, Italy studied lectins, microglia and Alzheimer's Disease (AD) as reported in Lectins and Pathology, 2000. The microglia of 10 AD brains stained intensely for agglutinins. Their research concluded that the glycation reaction seen in AD from lectins may serve as a significant factor in amyloid plaque development and disease progression.
    Bacteria overgrowth in the gut is associated with a wide variety of diseases- septicemia, pulmonary infections, enteropathies. Adhesion of pathogenic bacteria to epithelial cells in the gut can be a critical first stage in the infectious disease process. Michele Mouricout and Bruno Vedrine of Limoges, France described how lectins cause adhesion of numerous bacterial strains to intestines, brain tissues, urinary tract, lung and corneal cells. Their research is reported in Lectins and Pathology, 2000 illustrates the mosiac effect of how agglutinins cause tissue damage.
    Even though lectins have been identified for decades, little interest has been shown by biological and medical science. Since they are so widely distributed in foods consumed daily, lectins may finally become recognized as partners in the pathogenesis of diseases like cancer. Galectin-3 (gal 3) galactoside-binding lectin is found on the surface of most cancer cells and has been reported to promote angiogenesis. Lectins are not oncogenes but they help in cancer progression once initiated. Some are implicated in adhesion while others cause metatasis.
    Isn't it about time that nutrition science took a closer look at the lectin levels in foods consumed daily and customize the diet for lectin sensitivity to better manage inflammation and auto immune diseases? The higher intact of GMO food in the diet, the more lectins are consumed. Without food labeling of GMOs, consumers will continue to be misled and many will remain sick.

    Betty Wedman-St Louis, PhD, RD
    Celiac.com 06/16/2016 - Do you realize that metabolic and emotional stress, hormonal imbalance and food sensitivities all impact digestion? Many individuals believe that once they stop eating gluten, digestive disorders will disappear. Nothing could be further from the truth as we take a closer look at gastroenterology and the link between the gut and brain.
    The adult gut has between 10 trillion and 100 trillion bacteria that make up the microbiome or surface of the intestines. The goal for digestive wellness is to be sure that there are more GOOD bacteria than BAD bacteria in the microbiome. Food choices, antibiotic use and lifestyle play an important part in creating that balance. Endocrine disrupting chemicals in plastics, along with artificial sweeteners all influence the bacteria or microbiome levels.
    The bacteria content of the gut begins at birth. A vaginal delivery results in a microbiome from the mother while a cesarean section produces a microbiome from everyone who handles the infant. Gut bacteria levels are also influenced by breast feeding versus the use of infant formula.
    Diets deficient in fruits and vegetables mean less antioxidants are consumed so free radicals can destroy digestive and immune function. In addition, fruits and vegetables provide fiber for bacteria to grow on. Current research from the Journal of Clinical Nutrition indicates high fiber diets yield more bacteroides bacteria growth that helps control body weight. Low fiber diets result in more firmicute bacteria which produces weight gain and can lead to obesity.
    Microbiological safety in fresh produce continues to gain prominence in the media. Fresh cut, RTE (ready to eat) produce in convenient packages leads the way in food safety recalls. Fruits and vegetables are prone to microbial contamination from irrigation water, soil, fertilizers, insects, animal feces and field workers during pre-harvest processing. After harvest, the washing and sanitation procedures lack oversight. Remember to wash all raw fruits and vegetables to minimize food poisoning potential.
    Listeria monocytogenes is one of the leading causes of death from food borne illness. It is found in raw milk, cheese, and packaged deli meats. Flu-like symptoms can last days to weeks, and in pregnant women listeria infection can lead to miscarriage.
    Noroviruses make the news regularly, especially on cruise ships. Common food sources include raw produce and shellfish such as clams, mussels, scallops and oysters. Symptoms begin as early s 12 hours after ingestion and the malaise disappears 3 to 4 days later.
    Salmonella continues to plague many with chills, nausea, joint pain and headaches beginning 12 hours post ingestion. Eggs, poultry and raw produce are major sources of salmonella.
    Probiotics are an important addition to the celiac diet for balancing the bacteria levels in the GI tract. They should be taken WITH food to reduce the degradation in an acid stomach. Research has shown that urinary tract and vaginal infections have an improved management rate when lactobacillus and bifidobacterium multi-species probiotics are used.
    Probiotics are live bacteria which have been shown to reduce inflammation in the gastrointestinal tract. They also reduce intestinal permeability and influence serotonin and melatonin production in the gut.
    So since the human gut contains 10 times more bacteria than all the human cells in our body, keeping a healthy balance of bacteria in the gut is critical for digestive wellness.

    Betty Wedman-St Louis, PhD, RD
    Celiac.com 08/29/2016 - In 2005 the National Institute of Health indicated more than 23 million Americans suffered from autoimmune disease. Today the projection is 30 million who experience extreme fatigue, muscle and joint pain, muscle weakness, sleeplessness, weight loss or gain, and memory problems as symptoms of autoimmune disorders.
    Celiac disease has gotten the most attention in antibody research, but the current data on cross-reactivity of antibodies is allowing a better understanding of gluten sensitivity. Antigen reactivity to alpha-gliadin can trigger immune attacks on many individuals beyond those with positive DQ 2, DQ 8 and TTG test results.
    Gluten ataxia has been identified not only in people with celiac disease, but also in autism, lupus and multiple sclerosis. The lack of muscle control for movement, speech, eye coordination and swallowing can now be assessed in most autoimmune disorders.
    Gliadin reacts with foods and human tissue antigens causing symptoms beyond the gastro-intestinal tract. A low inflammatory diet customized to each person through testing for cross-reactivity or elimination diet protocols is needed to restore a state of health and well-being (for a copy of Low Inflammatory Diet & Elimination Diets check the author's website at the end of this article).
    According to Aristo Vojdani, PhD, professor of neuroimmunology at Carrick Institute and Chief Science Advisor for Cyrex Labs, about 50 percent gluten-sensitive individuals are also sensitive to dairy proteins (cow's milk, casein, whey) and sensitivity to oats depends on the variety of the grain and not just contamination from the milling process.
    In the author's personal experience, a gluten-free diet has many limitations. The reactivity between alpha gliadin and corn, millet, oats, rice and dairy has been denounced as invalid by gastroenterologists and celiac disease researchers. While at a medical school in Missouri, biopsies did not show improvement in villous atropy until all alpha gliadin sources and corn, millet, rice and oats were removed from the diet.
    Intestinal permeability or leaky gut allows antigens into the blood stream including food proteins, pathogens, and toxic chemicals which can cause inflammation. Continuous antigen exposure to tissues and organs is a factor in developing autoimmune disorders. Symptoms develop silently in the gut, joints and endocrine glands for several years. Tissue destruction with T and B lymphocyte reactions are a warning that autoimmune issues are developing during the next 5 to 10 year period until immunosuppressive drugs like corticosteroids are needed.
    To reduce the triggers to autoimmune diseases early, nutrition and lifestyle habits need adjusting.
    A Gluten-free Diet may seem easier today than 10 years ago, but current regulations in many countries allow up to 20 ppm gluten to be labeled "gluten-free". Many gliadin and cross -reactive proteins are most likely still available to create inflammatory symptoms.
    Assessing Viral Activity is key to managing autoimmune disease symptoms. Viral panels for EBV, Lyme, Bartonella, Mycoplasma, Chlamydia, CMV are available. Nutrition management of viral load is critical for the person with celiac disease and other autoimmune diseases.
    Reducing Toxic Chemicals is just as important as omitting gluten. Plastics like bisphenol A, heavy metals, pesticide residues, solvents all create inflammation. Water filtration devices that remove fluoride, heavy metals and pathogens plus stainless steel water bottles could reduce the body burden of chemicals that influence digestive function, joint movement, and immune well-being.

    Kay A. Chick, Ed.D.
    Celiac.com 11/15/2016 - Do you know someone who has lived with celiac disease for over eighty years? Someone who lived on nothing but mashed bananas for a year? Someone who continued to eat gluten for over 30 years because doctors didn't know how to treat a celiac diagnosis? Someone who experienced serious physical, emotional, and family challenges as a result? Well, I met such an individual at the International Celiac Symposium in Chicago in the fall of 2013. Clara (a pseudonym) attended my poster session, The Educational, Social, and Family Challenges of Children with Celiac Disease: What Parents Should Know. As she stood before my poster with tears in her eyes she began to say, "This is me. This is me." Through a brief conversation then, and several lengthy telephone interviews that followed, she shared her incredible story with me and gave me permission to share it with you.
    Clara was born in 1933 on a citrus ranch in California and was the youngest of five children. She was very sick as a baby with what her family thought was a "terrible case of the flu." She lost muscle tone, had wrinkly skin, and some mornings she didn't move or even open her eyelids without the help of her mother. She looked malnourished and had a distended stomach. When she was two, her parents took her to Dr. Victor E. Stork, but he was not sure what the problem might be. A few weeks later, the doctor attended a conference where he described Clara's symptoms. He learned of another child with similar symptoms who had been diagnosed with celiac disease and fed nothing but mashed bananas. After Dr. Stork informed Clara's parents, Clara's father purchased a big hook and drove to the Long Beach docks to buy bananas. He hung bunches of bananas on their back porch to ripen and she was fed nothing but mashed bananas for over a year. What started as half a teaspoon at a time quickly grew until she was eating many bananas each day. This part of Clara's story greatly intrigued me, as I had just read the research of Sidney Haas. In the 1920s Hass successfully treated eight children who were "anorexic" from celiac disease with the banana diet while untreated children did not survive (Guandalini, 2007).
    Growing up, Clara was a happy child but had no appetite and didn't enjoy food. She was very small for her age and, at times, was made to stay at the dinner table until she ate everything on her plate. Clara's mother, a practical nurse, thought she might be allergic to fat. The family kept a quarter of a beef in a freezer locker 25 miles away and her mother scraped the fat off the beef before giving it to Clara. She was also made to finish her breakfast, typically oatmeal, toast, and orange juice, before going to school in the morning. Clara routinely had vomiting and diarrhea each morning, and didn't understand why this didn't happen to other children. She missed school often because she had abdominal discomfort and was weak. Clara hid in the girls' restroom during recess and physical education so she wouldn't have to participate. Since she was unsuccessful at athletics she found it easier to sit on a toilet with her feet pulled up so no one would see her.
    Clara continued to miss a great deal of school but was required to do her school work at home. During second grade she worked ahead, completing both second and third grade work. Consequently, she was allowed to skip third grade, which only accentuated her small size. When she entered high school people thought she was in third or fourth grade. After entering puberty at age 14 she finally acquired an appetite and began to grow much taller. At this point in her life, Clara decided that she would never be sick again. She graduated from high school in 1950, after acting in dramatic productions, serving as president of the Girls' League, and planning the ten year class reunion.
    Clara married at age twenty, between her junior and senior years in college. She had few symptoms during this time and was hired as a kindergarten teacher. Her husband was drafted and she taught in several different places on the west coast while he was in the service. During this time, Clara had a baby girl followed by two miscarriages. Three weeks after the birth of their second child Clara became very ill and lost her hair. They had no insurance and she lost a dramatic amount of weight. She weighed only 80 pounds and her husband had to carry her from the bed to the couch. The vomiting and diarrhea got worse and her mother had to take care of her babies. She was on heavy doses of medication and her doctors thought her gastrointestinal problems "were all in her head."
    Clara's speech became "jumbled" and she was not making sense. Her doctor sent her to a psychiatrist who placed her in a "sanitarium." She was hospitalized for several months where she felt very isolated and alone. Her relatives weren't told where she was and her father would not allow her mother to visit her. At the sanitarium Clara received shock treatments every three days, ten in all. Her sister offered her son's college fund to pay the sanitarium bill so that Clara would be allowed to leave.
    When Clara returned home she found she had lost much of her memory. She didn't remember how to hold a knife and her daughter, who was three, taught her how to tie her shoes. She was on sedatives and slept much of the time. She does not know how she took care of her children during this time. Clara and her husband had little money, so she took in ironing and taught preschool. It took them twelve years to pay off the hospital bills.
    It was fifteen years after this experience, and two babies later, that Clara finally got treatment for her celiac disease. She was hospitalized at UCLA Medical Center for a month while more tests and an intestinal biopsy were completed. It was 1972, and she was now 39 years old. The gastroenterologist finally confirmed the diagnosis of celiac disease and told her that she would never be able to eat pie, bread, or cake ever again. Clara was so thrilled that it was "just food" that would make a difference and not cancer. The doctor told her that there was no reason why she was still alive. Within two months she was noticing a difference and had gained weight. Clara was able to go back to teaching part-time and started teaching full-time in 1981.
    After her celiac diagnosis Clara did her best to avoid grains completely. One doctor told her to eat wheat germ, a product she clearly was correct in avoiding. In the 1970s she tried to make bread with rice, but her attempts were very unsuccessful. Clara started a support group in 1984 which was part of the Celiac Sprue Association. Little by little the group started receiving information on eating gluten-free, as many of these foods were readily available in Europe. By 1988 there were some gluten-free foods available in California. Clara experimented with cooking and breads and tested recipes for Carol Fenster's cookbooks. Her household today is totally gluten-free, with the exception of a loaf of bread for her husband. She and her husband traveled extensively after their retirement, visiting every state except Hawaii, along with the Caribbean and Australia.
    As far as lessons learned, Clara believes that people should listen to each other. She says, "If a person says, I feel horrible, someone should listen. The medical profession didn't listen to me. They said it was all in my head. If they had listened I could have been helped." It is unfortunate that her doctors didn't listen, as Clara could have been diagnosed much sooner. Willem-Karel Dicke first published an article on the importance of a gluten-free diet for the treatment of celiac disease in 1941 (Berge-Henegouwen & Mulder, 1993).
    Since my own celiac diagnosis came within two months of the onset of symptoms, I marvel at how someone could live for 39 years while still eating gluten. I think about the lessons to be learned from Clara's story. I consider the advancements that have been made in the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease and the ease with which I'm able to eat gluten-free. And I send a reminder of the importance of early detection and the physical and emotional consequences that individuals like Clara face when a celiac diagnosis is delayed.
    References:
    Guandalini, S. (2007). A brief history of celiac disease. Impact, 7, (3), 1-2. Van Berge-Henegouwen, G. P., & Mulder, C.J. (1993). Pioneer in the gluten-free diet: Willem-Karel Dicke 1905-1962, over 50 year of gluten-free diet. Gut, 34, 1473-1475.

    Tina Turbin
    Celiac.com 05/11/2017 - As research continues to show the remarkable nutritional advantages of bone broth, it is gaining a spotlight in the nutritional world, especially in nutrient focused diets like the paleo diet, clean eating, and more. But though the attention may be new, it is actually an age old dietary staple dating back to paleo era days when utilizing every part of animals was essential. Bone broth has remained a dietary staple around the world for generations. It is an exceptionally nutrient dense broth made by simmering the bones and connective tissues of animals. It's surprisingly easy to make and the benefits offered are astounding. If you are new to this wonder food read on to find out about bone broth benefits and the real truth about all it offers!
    Top Benefits of Bone Broth
    Bone and Ligament Health. As bones are simmered in the making of bone broth, key bone health minerals such as calcium and phosphorous are infused into the broth. Additionally, the breakdown of the connective tissue used for bone broth provides a natural source of glucosamine and chondroitin which supports joint health. Gut Health. The gelatin produced from animal collagen provides a healing effect for the GI tract. People starting a gluten free or paleo diet in hopes of calming down an inflamed digestive tract may especially appreciate this benefit. Immune Health. Turns out the old wives tale of chicken soup to cure illness holds some truth. The rich mineral content and in particular the amino acids in bone broth support a healthy immune system. Women's Health. Bone broth also offers help when it comes to women's hormones. This is because poor nutrient absorption is closely tied to hormonal health. When the gut is inflamed, nutrient absorption suffers. By healing the gut, the body can better regulate hormone levels. Anti-Aging. The collagen rich gelatin found in bone broth may just be the fountain of youth. Adding to this anti-aging effect, the amino acid proline further helps to give strong and shiny hair, skin, and nails. Tips to Making Bone Broth Yourself
    Quality Matters. To avoid the chemicals conventionally raised animals are exposed to and gain maximal nutritional benefits, opt for bones from grass-fed cows and/or free range chickens. Pick the Right Parts. The bones, ligaments, and cartilage used in bone broth each offer benefits. The bones give the broth vitamins and minerals while the ligaments and cartilage provide all important collagen as they break down. Opt to include knuckles as much as possible as they are particularly collagen rich. Go Slow. The secret to bone broth is going 'low and slow.' Cooking broth in a slow cooker on a lower heat setting for a longer period of time allows the collagen, vitamins, and nutrients to best be released into your broth. Add an Acid. Be sure to add a spoonful of an acid such as apple cider vinegar to help break down the connective tissue and collagen. This is a very simple approach to adding something extremely beneficial to just about anyone's diet or health routine.

  • Popular Contributors

  • Forum Discussions

    I used to use Oil of Olay sensitive skin, but when I got a Nima Sensor it tested positive for gluten and I switched to Jergens Daily moisture fragrance free. Nima isn't meant for testing non food products, but I can't take the risk.  
    OMG I’ve having the same issue with dairy, sugars, even natural sugars like fruits! I’m following this thread. I really thought I was the only one! Thanks for asking it. My dr says I just need to go a good 6 months gluten/sugar/dairy free to “reset my system” and it should help. We’ll see. Good luck to you sir!   AJ
    We call IBS the I Be Stumped non diagnosis. It's a cop out by doctors. IBS is a symptom NOT a diagnosis.   Oh AG, how terribly awful!!!!!!!! I've read about that skin condition before but never known anyone who actually had it. OOF!
×
×
  • Create New...