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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    LOVIN' THAT GLUTEN-FREE FEELING


    Fawn Burgess


    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2014 Issue


    Celiac.com 12/23/2016 - Before my dog Amber's health started to fall apart, I had observed friends and family members on their gluten free journeys without ever considering this could be a solution for me. Years of periodic juice fasting, vegan and vegetarian diets, and then finally a GMO-free, semi-vegetarian lifestyle, had never led me to consider complete and total gluten free eating, until Amber.


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    At nine years old she began to have a chronic yeast and skin infection and she stunk. Her stools became bloody, she was fat, her walking was slow and labored, and the vet said that if we didn't find out what was wrong with her soon she'd be dead within a year. He referred me to a woman in Eugene, OR who worked with animals and might know what I could do.

    The woman told me to immediately change her diet from dog food that contained grains, to gluten-free. She said that most retrievers and labs will carry on as if healthy for years with no issue, and then suddenly begin to fall apart when they reach senior ages. Their bodies can no longer tolerate gluten at that point, and a bundle of symptoms will appear.

    We began shopping at Animal Crackers, a store in town that sells a variety of high quality animal foods. Amber began eating gluten-free Orijen dog food, and within three months her skin lesions and yeast infection had healed. Also, all stink was gone, her stools were normal, and she was suddenly bounding around the park with puppy energy again. No doubt a dietary change had healed her.

    Soon afterward, at 47 years old, I suddenly decided to not eat anything with gluten in it. It wasn't even a plan or necessity, it was just like, one day I found myself buying gluten-free muffins and trying them. For some unexplainable reason I stuck to no gluten for a while, and by day three I noticed I was feeling happier.

    A lack of longing for traditional bread surprised me, because I love baking, and eating homemade bread. To omit my beloved goodies seemed extreme, and I was always of the opinion that organic and GMO-free wheat and gluten was sufficient unto itself, if one didn't have celiac disease.

    Yet here I was, day four and feeling fantastic. Actually, I wasn't sure what changes were occurring. I felt lighter, with an absence of discontent in my body. I experienced frequent bursts of 'anti-depression', akin to joyful energy rushes, which I never related to hyperactive sensations. Sleep became easy and relaxing. I would awaken with recharged emotional and physical well being. I began to crave junk food less, my stomach flattened, and all jitters went away. I found myself patiently standing in long lines, an unfamiliar feeling to me, and my mind cleared up, pleasurably.

    After about two weeks of observing these lovely 'feel-good' transformations, I discovered a divine intervention had occurred with bladder control. Years of frustration and concern, even discussions with a doctor about surgical intervention, had led me to believe that I was cursed with a life long issue of urinary stress incontinence. Yet, now I was noticing that a gluten-free change had all but dissolved my problem!

    Even as a 'wheat bellied' child I'd had incontinence issues, and this only exacerbated after two natural child births. Months of yoga, kegal exercises, and daily trampoline jumping helped some, but it never entirely went away. With a gluten-free dietary change, bloating and mild incontinence are now absent. This calm, non jittery, focused, new me, experimented ever so cautiously with jogging around the block, and nothing happened!

    About a month into it, I decided to eat a wheat bun with a hamburger, just to see if I would feel any different. After a couple hours, my mind went to dull and foggy mode, my body felt a little heavier and 'full', and what must have been a chronic urinary tract inflammation for years, returned again to nag at me. Minor leakage reared it's bothersome head again, but only for as long as it took to get gluten out of my system. The difference was like going from "Ah!" to "blah."

    A surprising factor in my gluten-free experience is that I've always been a healthy and happy person. I never seriously considered taking beloved gluten filled foods out of my diet, because I love those foods and never got sick eating them, OR so I thought. Aches and pains I figured were genetic curses, and part of my natural aging.

    Oh how wrong I was! After a year of gluten-free living, every organ in my body approves of this change, including bowels and nervous system. Best of all, I've experienced a seeming miraculous, non surgical intervention, with hardly any effort. And there's more to my story:

    Before gluten-free my cholesterol was high. I'd tried diet and natural supplements to no avail, and finally went on a statin medication to control it. It remained high and challenging until I changed my diet to gluten-free. With virtually no decrease in my fat intake, this life style change has brought the cholesterol level down. My latest labs shows normal levels, and once I accomplish a goal of eating more vegetables (than all these darn delicious gluten-free baked goods), and staying on a clean, low fat diet, I will explore going off cholesterol medication, once and for all.

    I continue to get caught up in all the numerous gluten-free pizza crust, pastry and bread recipes available. My salad creations are sorely neglected and I know this is my next challenge. But I won't beat myself up too much for enjoying this new exploration of 'all foods gluten free', (including beer- I recommend Omission).

    As for ever going backward, I have zero desire whatsoever, to return to a gluten filled lifestyle. I LOVE the way I feel now. When tempted by gluten-filled foods, I think of how I can now jog as long as I want to, with no leakage, for the first time in over twenty years. And I remember how surgery is out of the picture when it was once in my future, which is fantastic! I'm aware now that the source of my incontinence was a chronic, low level inflammation caused by gluten. The inflammation attacked various organs and areas all over my body, especially the bladder and urinary tract. Gluten even effected my cholesterol level in negative ways. So no way to that whole wheat bread, because I feel terrific now and I want to stay this way.


    Image Caption: Image: CC--Franck Mahon
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    Yvonne Vissing Ph.D.
    Celiac.com 03/23/2016 - Often when people hear that someone is "going gluten-free," they think that just means people are not eating wheat. This kind of thinking focuses on the obvious—since gluten is in foods it means watching what is eaten. They may associate this change in diet with some biological process or disease issue. In the world of the general public, they're not really sure what "gluten" is and they're not totally convinced that eliminating it will improve health. But for those of us who make a commitment to going gluten-free, it is far more than just eliminating certain food products. It is a personal transformation of self. What people don't often talk about is it being a psychological and social change as well.
    In many ways, making a commitment to seriously go gluten-free is an act of Zen. The Urban Dictionary defines Zen as "a state of focus that incorporates a total togetherness of body and mind. Zen is a way of being. It also is a state of mind. Zen involves dropping illusion and seeing things without distortion created by your own thoughts." What I've found is that going gluten-free requires thoughtful practice, observing the body, monitoring the mind, and seeking knowledge that one integrates into regular practice. The result is the personal expression of insight into daily life.
    Going gluten-free isn't just about eating. It is also about personal discipline. It has a lot to do about how we think and how we live. When we started going gluten-free we thought it was just going to entail a dietary switch. What we've learned over the last decade is that going gluten-free is an act of Zen. Our journey into becoming gluten-free started because health issues forced us down that path. We didn't willingly choose to go there. We would have been content with gorging on Texas toast, pasta, and Oreos for the rest of our lives. But if we did, we would have been chronically sick. The Universe pushed us onto the gluten-free road. At first, we did not go gracefully. We stumbled and fell and made a mess of going gluten-free. Going gluten-free seemed miserably hard and terribly inconvenient. We couldn't find products that tasted good, and those we found were expensive and weren't necessarily healthy (the amounts of eggs, butter or oil in many of them were mind-boggling). We spent too much money on poor-tasting products that were very difficult to find. We griped and complained. We felt alienated and imprisoned. Going out to eat was life-threatening because most restaurants didn't cook dishes that were safe, or if they did they cooked them in an environment in which they could be cross-contaminated. The idea of having to eat awful-tasting food and not being able to go out to eat for the rest of one's life was dreadful and depressing. Eating is one of the joys of life, and feeling like one was never going to be able to eat delicious food again felt like a fate worse than death. Going gluten-free seemed doomed to be an act of suffering. Sometimes, it is only through making a mess of our lives that we figure out how not to.
    Such is the case with our going gluten-free. What we didn't realize until later was that we had created this negative reality in our minds. You can go gluten-free smoothly, effortlessly, inexpensively, and easily with no disruptions in your daily lives. It need not be a big deal. This process may take a bit of time. The secret in this transformation has little to do with the gluten-free foods available. It has more to do with what is going on in our heads.
    Years of diligent practice, trial-and-error, patience and persistence, and learning have helped us to transform our perception of going gluten-free into an easy, inexpensive, and delicious way of eating. It has also fostered a different relationship with what we eat, why we eat, and how we eat. It has changed our relationship with food itself, how it is prepared, and how it is consumed.
    Thinking you can eat anything you want and not get sick is illusion for people who must go gluten-free. It requires mind-over-matter self-control when we're hungry and desire foods that may not be safe. Giving in to that longing for a certain cookie or a bite of Grandma's homemade lasagna can make a person with celiac very sick. Being mindful of why that food item creates desire in us is a useful mental exercise. Certain foods evoke memories and emotions that are more delicious than the foods themselves. We can still enjoy the memories without eating foods that aren't good for us.
    Food is very social and relational. Eating something served that isn't safe in order to please or not to appear rude, when it has a high likelihood of making us sick, isn't being kind to oneself. There have been times we've gotten annoyed when what-should-be-safe food has been contaminated. On the surface, it shouldn't be a big deal to redo the dish. But the symbolic message conveyed by serving someone with celiac glutened food is more problematic because it reflects that the server didn't really care about our needs. What happens to our relationships with family, friends, or certain establishments who go out of their way to make sure we can eat good foods, safely, in a no-big-deal manner? We care for them all the more. Frankly, we secretly want to see what goes on in the kitchen and read the ingredients on a product and not just take a waiter's declaration that "I'm sure it's gluten-free" to be an accurate reflection of reality until we are sure that what they say accurately reflects how actively sensitive they are to the needs of others who have dietary needs that are different from their own. Issues of trusting others, and trusting ourselves, is part of the gluten-free process. Helping to teach those who didn't understand the importance of being gluten-free in a constructive and thoughtful manner is much better than getting angry at them and refusing to eat with them again.
    Going gluten-free requires mindfulness. It gives us a relationship with our food as well as with others. Eating whole and healthy foods is better for us. Taking time to understand what's in our food really matters. Cooking ingredients in a thoughtful, less-hurried way creates lovelier dishes. Consuming them with gratitude and in communication with others makes them even more delicious. We want to know where the food came from, how it was cooked and what it was cooked with, and details of the dish's preparation. Were those oats grown next to a wheat field? Did these nuts get processed on machines that also processed other items that contained glutens? Were there croutons on the salad that you just picked off? Asking questions in a non-combative way is an art. Learning to read labels and knowing the list of unsafe ingredients must be transformed from being a big deal to it being just another routine step in an ordinary day. Learning how to shop, cook, clean, serve and eat are all actually complicated steps that require attention to detail. It is in the transformation of managing all these details into a smooth, seamless and calm process that going gluten-free becomes Zen.
    It took us a long time to realize that going gluten-free successfully has more to do with what's going on in our heads than what's going on in the kitchen. Look upon going gluten-free as a Zen experience, in which you have to change one pattern of behavior for a new, better one. You, like we, may find you have to change attitudes toward eating in general and eating gluten foods in particular—and you will be all the better for it.
    We'd love to help you to learn more about our approach to going gluten-free. Check out our book, Going Gluten-free, which is available from Amazon and NorLights Press, and let us know how your journey is going!

    Tony Allen, B.Sc., B.Ed.
    Celiac.com 07/12/2016 - Late in 1998 after discussions with a colleague, who later became my mentor in this field, some loud bells started to ring inside my head as we talked about this little-known (to me at least) condition called celiac disease, an autoimmune disease, as well as non celiac gluten sensitivity. Both of these ailments are triggered by a family of dietary proteins called gluten. Of course, I had been following eating practices based on commonly held beliefs about wheat as the "staff of life" and doing things that were taught to me as 'scientifically accurate'. Yet talking with my colleague, I kept getting answers that implicated this nutritional food group for a myriad of problems that I'd had for as long as I could remember.
    Hearing about these ailments caused by gluten, I started connecting some of my own experiences with the signs and symptoms he was talking about, especially in relation to my journey through the education system. Physical and behavioral problems had plagued my educational life, making it a disaster. I worked with various educational specialists, from the very beginning, yet they did not seem to be able to help me much. I couldn't maintain a pace of learning that was even remotely close to that of my peers, in most of my scholastic endeavors. As my self-esteem dropped, my behavior worsened. I found myself increasingly being removed from classes and from schools. I sometimes thought that if I heard the words "he just does not apply himself" one more time, I would spontaneously explode. That being said, I am still very thankful for some compassionate, caring teachers and coaches who saw through all my issues and stayed committed trying to help me muddle through and keep moving along in my educational journey.
    As a high school athletics coach and teacher of Health and Physical Education, now, I often find myself offering dietary concepts and information to students and colleagues that is at odds with what I learned at university just over 20 years ago. And the misinformation I learned is still commonly being touted, even today. Admittedly, research in the field of Nutrition has undergone some dramatic changes over the last two decades, but what I'm talking about is a more fundamental shift in thinking about what we eat and whether it will promote optimum athletic performance, protection from disease, longevity, and a healthy body composition that is more in line with wellness.
    For instance, I was taught that carbohydrates are the preferred fuel for our muscles, and that carbing-up prior to an athletic event is an effective and desirable strategy. I was also taught that weight loss could be achieved through increased physical activity. I now view these issues very differently. Athletic performance is often enhanced by avoiding many of the foods, such as gluten and sugar, that I was taught to value. Today, I am constantly seeing articles or interviews about high performance athletes who have left the old nutrition paradigm behind and are having great success and increased career longevity in their chosen field. Novak Djokovic is one prominent example where the underlying problem was celiac disease. Vande Velde and Tom Danielson are two professional cyclists who also report performance increases from a gluten-free diet (1). Such a shift in eating can also, especially among young people, remove or reduce learning disabilities as reported by one school that works only with children who struggle with dyslexia (2).
    Conventional thinkers seem to believe that these benefits have something to do with improved nutrient absorption. However, they may come from enhanced nerve conduction or function. After all, Marios Hadjivassiliou and his colleagues at the Royal Hallamshire Hospital at the University of Sheffield have long been reporting that gluten, even in the absence of celiac disease, is responsible for a large portion of neurological ailments of unknown origin (3). Or the improvements may come from something entirely different. But wherever the improved performance and health are coming from, the gluten-free diet seems to be a great starting place.
    For instance, a former student, C.W., who has given his permission for me to talk about his case, experienced dramatic changes on a gluten-free and dairy free diet. Already an accomplished athlete, C.W. had also struggled for years with serious academic problems. He struggled with his reading and his writing and was still functioning at the level of an elementary student. A colleague and I recommended that C.W. try this diet to hone his fitness. Not only did he enhance his athletic performance, his reading skills improved abruptly and dramatically. Both his comprehension and his reading speed increased significantly over just a few months. Before he had been on the diet a full year, he was reading novels for pleasure. This was a far cry from his prior brushes with reading, where he was often unable to remember what was said in a sentence he had just finished reading. Certainly, by the end of a paragraph he was previously unable to say how it had begun. Now, he is reading novels, enjoying the experience, and he remembers them well enough to be able to talk, in detail, about the story.
    My own experience with the gluten-free diet has not produced such rapid results, at least regarding my reading and writing. I certainly felt healthier very quickly, and found it much easier to have a leaner body composition. Many of my minor physical complaints also disappeared, but it has taken years for my struggles with reading to diminish. Today, I am able to read highly technical reports from the peer reviewed medical and nutritional literature. I also find myself reading large, technical books about nutrition and other health issues. I read them cover-to-cover, and I understand most of what I read.
    My writing is also improving gradually. There is no question in my mind that the gluten-free diet has helped me enormously in these areas, although much more slowly than they helped C.W. Neither do I know how many other children that a gluten-free diet could help. I can only say that if you or someone close to you experiences a learning disability or unexplained gastro intentional issues or withdrawal symptoms when trying to eliminate wheat for a short time, it would be very worthwhile to follow a strict gluten-free diet for six months.
    Sources:
    http://rosecole.com/old/articles/fat-loss/enhance-athletic-performance-go-gluten-wheat-free.html Alexandra Blair. Wheat-free diet gives food for thought. http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/article444290.ece Hadjivassiliou M, Gibson A, Davies-Jones GA, Lobo AJ, Stephenson TJ, Milford-Ward A. (1996). Does cryptic gluten sensitivity play a part in neurological illness? Lancet. Feb 10;347(8998):369-71.

    Kit Kellison
    Celiac.com 09/08/2016 - I'm going to discuss a topic that I'm sure will be fraught with controversy. However, as someone who has watched the difficulty that so many new patients have in navigating their diets on gluten-free and celiac forums for the past twelve years, I believe it's time to consider a new model for approaching the gluten-free diet.
    A gluten-free diet is essential to the celiac patient, but it disrupts the metabolism in profound ways that, until now, we have ignored because there is absolutely no other option for those of us who can't digest gluten. It is worth noting that there are other situations where we may find ourselves drastically reducing carbohydrates in order to realize health benefits. (Bear with me here, I'm going to tie it all together soon!) Changing the diet to limit or eliminate one's intake of grains and starch is a common response to many of the following situations:
    People who have celiac disease, non-celiac gluten sensitivity or wheat allergy. Diabetics who seek to stabilize blood sugar. People with small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) who need to limit all di- and polysaccharides (most starches and sugars) per the SCD or GAPS diets. People on the FODMAP (Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharides, Monosaccharides And Polyols) diet for fructose, lactose and fructans intolerance. Many celiac patients report benefits of this diet when symptoms don't resolve after treating celiac disease. People starting the Paleo diet or the autoimmune protocol diet (AIP) are instructed to stop eating grains and processed foods. People eating a very low-carb diet (below 40 grams per day) in an effort to shed excess body weight. People with epilepsy and certain other neurological disturbances who benefit from a reduction in carbohydrates in order to promote ketosis (see Gut and Psychology Syndrome diet, or "GAPS diet"). People who are fighting metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance. The thing that all these situations have in common is the need to make a significant dietary reduction of grains and starch. While the standard American diet consists of 300-400 or more grams of carbs a day, some diets restrict carb intake to less than 20-40 grams. A significant carb reduction of any kind can cause a huge strain on our well-being by causing a dip in thyroid function.
    Paleo diet authors generally recommend a maximum of 100-150 grams of carbs in order to stabilize blood sugar, a decrease in carbs of at least 50% for most people.
    Even those of us who are merely cutting out gluten because of a celiac diagnosis can have a very difficult time adjusting to the new diet. Unfortunately, little is mentioned about the down side of making such a huge, if necessary, change in eating habits.
    About a third of us feel so lousy after cutting down on our carbohydrate intake that we seriously consider turning our backs on our new diets. The strain of staying on track can be overwhelming.
    Twelve years ago, as a newly-diagnosed celiac patient, I experienced sleep disturbances, anxiety so high I couldn't relax, hyper-vigilance, an absolutely crushing brain-fog as well as general malaise. I had been sent out into the world beyond my doctor's office with no more than a celiac disease diagnosis and the advice that I now need to stop eating gluten.
    And stop I did.
    I had been ill for so long prior to my diagnosis that I would have given up all food if I thought it would make me feel better. I was so distrustful of every processed food I had grown accustomed to that for the first two weeks I ate little more than broiled chicken breasts, steamed broccoli and rice. The whole process of shopping, cooking and eating sometimes became psychologically overwhelming. I was afraid I'd starve to death if I left the house for more than half an hour so I always kept a gluten-free protein bar in my purse to prevent all-out panic.
    There may be more than one process at work here.
    Why do I feel so awful?
    A couple of small studies point to a problem low-carbers have in maintaining production and uptake of the thyroid hormone triiodothyronine (often referred to as T3). T3 is the most active form of thyroid hormone. Every cell in the body needs it for oxygen uptake. A sudden reduction in carbohydrate intake can lead to a dip in T3 availability that can lead to cognitive problems, depression, anxiety, fatigue, weight gain, constipation, heart palpitations and a laundry list of other hypothyroidism related symptoms and complications.
    Although this can happen to anyone reducing carbohydrates, most people will eventually bounce back if they are getting over 100 grams of carbs a day. However, for those very-low carbers who stay under 20 daily grams, they can expect to deal with a sluggish thyroid until their carb intake increases to maintenance levels.
    Gluten Withdrawal is Real
    It also appears that some of us are quite sensitive to the opioids in the grains we most commonly eat. Every grain has it's own opioid, but they differ from each other. Even cutting out wheat or gluten while maintaining a high carb intake can give us symptoms that mirror drug withdrawal, so obviously, it's not just about carb reduction.
    Although the amount of opioids in wheat is quite small, we all have opioid receptors in our brains that have the potential to become quite dependent on our little wheat-driven drug rush. I think anyone who has quelled their hunger or anxiety with a piece of bread and butter and felt that "ahhhhhh" response can relate. The enormous (if temporary) sense of satisfaction that comes with sitting down to a bowl of pasta may be due to the presence of the opioids in the semolina wheat grains that were used to make that delicious fettucine alfredo.
    "Gluten withdrawal," has a real biochemical basis; you wouldn't expect someone to kick Ativan or Vicodin in one fell swoop. In fact, it's downright dangerous. Perhaps we shouldn't be asking it of people who must give up their usual grains.
    People who kick an addictive drug have been helped mightily by the use of a drug called "low-dose naltrexone (LDN). It has been suggested that, by the same mechanism, it can prevent some of the problems created by the discontinuation of grains. I, for one, would love to see some research on this.
    Most Americans are familiar with the concept of filling up on a Chinese buffet only to feel hungry ten minutes later. Most Asian recipes use rice as a base of the main dish, so we are getting plenty of carbs. But why do we still feel hungry soon afterward even though our belts are still too tight?
    I remember back when my family lived in a great little neighborhood in Pennsylvania. Norristown, like most Philadelphia suburbs, was comprised of small storefronts and lots of nearly identical, charming brick row houses. We lived in a cute little twin number next door to a big Asian family with whom we soon became acquainted. One of the kids brought over a very generous house-warming gift of wonton soup. The first time I slurped from Ahn Nguyen's golden liquid luxury, replete with beautifully folded floating dumplings, I thought I'd died and gone to heaven. She sent many delicious treats over during the time we lived next to them and I can't think of those wonderful dishes these many years later without my mouth watering.
    Although it couldn't come close, I tried to pay some of our debt to them by inviting the family of seven over to a big dinner of spaghetti, meatballs (complete with homemade marinara), fresh grated Parmesan and garlic bread and a big green salad (obviously, this was a time previous to my celiac diagnosis.) Ahn and her family all seemed to enjoy the meal, but she confessed to me afterward that she needed to go home for a bowl of rice in order to feel full. This after she had eaten two big plates of spaghetti!
    Clearly, her discomfort wasn't a matter of getting enough starch.
    My best guess is that she missed the specific opioids in rice that she had likely consumed at every meal. I can't help but wonder now whether some Tinkyada rice pasta would have done the trick for her. Perhaps the opioids in the wheat-based food helped somewhat but they just couldn't satisfy her craving for that tiny amount of rice opioid; that narcotic-like substance on which her brain and body had come to depend.
    The Role of Ketones
    Another possible mechanism at work might be the unusual difficulty that some people have in converting fatty acids into ketones. When human beings don't have enough sugar or starch available from our diet to convert into glucose, we really feel it in fatigue and mental sluggishness. We may become uncommonly irritable as well. Luckily, our bodies have the marvelous adaptive ability to convert fatty acids to ketone bodies. These ketone bodies may be converted from either dietary fatty acids or from our own fat stores. Ketones are the only known source outside of glucose that lend energy to our brains and bodies.
    Unfortunately, about 14% of the population (including me) has an APOe4 gene variant that makes our livers less efficient at getting energy from fat; we have a harder time producing ketone bodies than everyone else when our glucose stores suddenly plummet. Note that this gene is also associated with a marked increase in the risk of Alzheimer's disease. Some researchers believe that this is due to the difficulty in making ketones, which may protect the brain from insulin resistance.
    For those of us with APOe4, it may just be that much more difficult to achieve a fat-adapted state that will allow the production of ketone bodies. Those of us with APOe4 and everyone who has a harder time going low-carb may just need a little more time in the adaptation process to get our livers to change their stubborn ways. It can't be healthy, while waiting for ketones to kick in, for our brains and bodies to be starved of energy.
    Is it possible that there is one answer to all of these problems? Could a much more gradual transition from high carb to low carb or gluten-free put less strain on body systems?
    I propose that we examine the possibility that cold turkey isn't the best way to cut back on either gluten or carbs. What evidence do we have that the best way is the hard way?
    Yes, for some of us, wheat or gluten is absolute poison and we want to be rid of it as soon as possible. But will taking a week or two to wean off of it really have any lasting negative impact on our overall health? For those who don't have severe digestive symptoms at the point of a celiac or NCGS diagnosis, a strategy of careful withdrawal should be considered.
    So, let's say you have just been diagnosed with celiac disease. Or diabetes, or metabolic syndrome, or hypoglycemia or SIBO, or epilepsy or you simply want to drop excess weight on the Atkins diet. You've been told, or have figured out on your own, that cutting down on carbs or cutting out gluten is your next step back to health. How do you go about it?
    Should you simply throw out all the crackers? Toss all your mixes, breads, flours and pastas? File all your cupcakes, cookies and brownies to the round file?
    Well, yes and no.
    Get rid of everything but your last loaf of bread and put that in the freezer. It will help to get those slices apart later if you can stagger the slices inside the wrapper or even put a square of wax paper between them. This also works well for people on a gluten free diet who are cutting carbs. In that case, use gluten-free bread.
    If you feel significant distress when cutting carbs or grains, let your head tell you when to eat that slice of bread. When you get dizzy, foggy and irritable, that's the time. Just try to spread them apart as much as possible without suffering overly for it. Trust me on this, in a couple of weeks it will all be over!
    Those who don't experience discomfort may still benefit by following this guideline:
    Days 1-3: two slices of bread maximum Days 4-6: one slice of bread daily; you may want to eat 1/2 slice twice a day Days 7-14: 1/2 slice of bread per day, maximum After day 14, quit eating it altogether When it's time to have your slice of bread, take a piece out of the freezer, put it in the toaster or thaw it in the microwave for 10 seconds and eat it with a big slab of good butter. Kerry Gold is my favorite butter. It's from grass-fed cows so it has lots of healthy omega-3 fatty acids. If this is your last loaf of real bread, you might as well make it count! Consider this as the long goodbye and the first step in the mourning process.
    Spread those slices out for as long as you can stand it, but don't let yourself suffer for long.
    Pretty soon, one slice a day will keep all those annoying withdrawal symptoms completely at bay. After that point, you only need to eat a half a slice at a time. You may soon go a day or two without noticing any problems; at that point, you're home free, and you need never eat it again. Throw the rest out or leave it out for your family, if you have an gluten-eaters in the household.
    Clearly, this whole subject needs a lot more research. I'd like to see more study on exactly what happens to thyroid levels during carb restriction. I'd like to know what it does to our blood sugar, our livers and our brains when we make huge lifestyle changes such as these. I'd like to know how we vary in our ability to produce ketones and how many of us function optimally on ketones in the absence of glucose. We should also know what happens to our microbiome, the bacterial colony that lives mainly in our guts when we change our diets. I think we are just now scratching the surface in learning how food interacts with our bodies.
    Yes, there is a lot to learn and some are making strides in discovering how food helps and hurts our health. In the meantime, we are wise to tread carefully, even when making a necessary lifestyle upgrade.
    References:
    Decline in T3 after low carb diet: Ullrich IH, Peters PJ, Albrink MJ. Journal of the American College of Nutrition [1985, 4(4):451-459] http://dev.europepmc.org/abstract/MED/3900181/ GAPS diet: http://www.gapsdiet.com/ FODMAPS diet: http://stanfordhospital.org/digestivehealth/nutrition/DH-Low-FODMAP-Diet-Handout.pdf Atkins diet: http://www.atkins.com/Home.aspx Paleo diet: http://robbwolf.com/what-is-the-paleo-diet/

    Kay A. Chick, Ed.D.
    Celiac.com 11/15/2016 - Do you know someone who has lived with celiac disease for over eighty years? Someone who lived on nothing but mashed bananas for a year? Someone who continued to eat gluten for over 30 years because doctors didn't know how to treat a celiac diagnosis? Someone who experienced serious physical, emotional, and family challenges as a result? Well, I met such an individual at the International Celiac Symposium in Chicago in the fall of 2013. Clara (a pseudonym) attended my poster session, The Educational, Social, and Family Challenges of Children with Celiac Disease: What Parents Should Know. As she stood before my poster with tears in her eyes she began to say, "This is me. This is me." Through a brief conversation then, and several lengthy telephone interviews that followed, she shared her incredible story with me and gave me permission to share it with you.
    Clara was born in 1933 on a citrus ranch in California and was the youngest of five children. She was very sick as a baby with what her family thought was a "terrible case of the flu." She lost muscle tone, had wrinkly skin, and some mornings she didn't move or even open her eyelids without the help of her mother. She looked malnourished and had a distended stomach. When she was two, her parents took her to Dr. Victor E. Stork, but he was not sure what the problem might be. A few weeks later, the doctor attended a conference where he described Clara's symptoms. He learned of another child with similar symptoms who had been diagnosed with celiac disease and fed nothing but mashed bananas. After Dr. Stork informed Clara's parents, Clara's father purchased a big hook and drove to the Long Beach docks to buy bananas. He hung bunches of bananas on their back porch to ripen and she was fed nothing but mashed bananas for over a year. What started as half a teaspoon at a time quickly grew until she was eating many bananas each day. This part of Clara's story greatly intrigued me, as I had just read the research of Sidney Haas. In the 1920s Hass successfully treated eight children who were "anorexic" from celiac disease with the banana diet while untreated children did not survive (Guandalini, 2007).
    Growing up, Clara was a happy child but had no appetite and didn't enjoy food. She was very small for her age and, at times, was made to stay at the dinner table until she ate everything on her plate. Clara's mother, a practical nurse, thought she might be allergic to fat. The family kept a quarter of a beef in a freezer locker 25 miles away and her mother scraped the fat off the beef before giving it to Clara. She was also made to finish her breakfast, typically oatmeal, toast, and orange juice, before going to school in the morning. Clara routinely had vomiting and diarrhea each morning, and didn't understand why this didn't happen to other children. She missed school often because she had abdominal discomfort and was weak. Clara hid in the girls' restroom during recess and physical education so she wouldn't have to participate. Since she was unsuccessful at athletics she found it easier to sit on a toilet with her feet pulled up so no one would see her.
    Clara continued to miss a great deal of school but was required to do her school work at home. During second grade she worked ahead, completing both second and third grade work. Consequently, she was allowed to skip third grade, which only accentuated her small size. When she entered high school people thought she was in third or fourth grade. After entering puberty at age 14 she finally acquired an appetite and began to grow much taller. At this point in her life, Clara decided that she would never be sick again. She graduated from high school in 1950, after acting in dramatic productions, serving as president of the Girls' League, and planning the ten year class reunion.
    Clara married at age twenty, between her junior and senior years in college. She had few symptoms during this time and was hired as a kindergarten teacher. Her husband was drafted and she taught in several different places on the west coast while he was in the service. During this time, Clara had a baby girl followed by two miscarriages. Three weeks after the birth of their second child Clara became very ill and lost her hair. They had no insurance and she lost a dramatic amount of weight. She weighed only 80 pounds and her husband had to carry her from the bed to the couch. The vomiting and diarrhea got worse and her mother had to take care of her babies. She was on heavy doses of medication and her doctors thought her gastrointestinal problems "were all in her head."
    Clara's speech became "jumbled" and she was not making sense. Her doctor sent her to a psychiatrist who placed her in a "sanitarium." She was hospitalized for several months where she felt very isolated and alone. Her relatives weren't told where she was and her father would not allow her mother to visit her. At the sanitarium Clara received shock treatments every three days, ten in all. Her sister offered her son's college fund to pay the sanitarium bill so that Clara would be allowed to leave.
    When Clara returned home she found she had lost much of her memory. She didn't remember how to hold a knife and her daughter, who was three, taught her how to tie her shoes. She was on sedatives and slept much of the time. She does not know how she took care of her children during this time. Clara and her husband had little money, so she took in ironing and taught preschool. It took them twelve years to pay off the hospital bills.
    It was fifteen years after this experience, and two babies later, that Clara finally got treatment for her celiac disease. She was hospitalized at UCLA Medical Center for a month while more tests and an intestinal biopsy were completed. It was 1972, and she was now 39 years old. The gastroenterologist finally confirmed the diagnosis of celiac disease and told her that she would never be able to eat pie, bread, or cake ever again. Clara was so thrilled that it was "just food" that would make a difference and not cancer. The doctor told her that there was no reason why she was still alive. Within two months she was noticing a difference and had gained weight. Clara was able to go back to teaching part-time and started teaching full-time in 1981.
    After her celiac diagnosis Clara did her best to avoid grains completely. One doctor told her to eat wheat germ, a product she clearly was correct in avoiding. In the 1970s she tried to make bread with rice, but her attempts were very unsuccessful. Clara started a support group in 1984 which was part of the Celiac Sprue Association. Little by little the group started receiving information on eating gluten-free, as many of these foods were readily available in Europe. By 1988 there were some gluten-free foods available in California. Clara experimented with cooking and breads and tested recipes for Carol Fenster's cookbooks. Her household today is totally gluten-free, with the exception of a loaf of bread for her husband. She and her husband traveled extensively after their retirement, visiting every state except Hawaii, along with the Caribbean and Australia.
    As far as lessons learned, Clara believes that people should listen to each other. She says, "If a person says, I feel horrible, someone should listen. The medical profession didn't listen to me. They said it was all in my head. If they had listened I could have been helped." It is unfortunate that her doctors didn't listen, as Clara could have been diagnosed much sooner. Willem-Karel Dicke first published an article on the importance of a gluten-free diet for the treatment of celiac disease in 1941 (Berge-Henegouwen & Mulder, 1993).
    Since my own celiac diagnosis came within two months of the onset of symptoms, I marvel at how someone could live for 39 years while still eating gluten. I think about the lessons to be learned from Clara's story. I consider the advancements that have been made in the diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease and the ease with which I'm able to eat gluten-free. And I send a reminder of the importance of early detection and the physical and emotional consequences that individuals like Clara face when a celiac diagnosis is delayed.
    References:
    Guandalini, S. (2007). A brief history of celiac disease. Impact, 7, (3), 1-2. Van Berge-Henegouwen, G. P., & Mulder, C.J. (1993). Pioneer in the gluten-free diet: Willem-Karel Dicke 1905-1962, over 50 year of gluten-free diet. Gut, 34, 1473-1475.

    Molly Hallström
    Celiac.com 01/04/2017 - Ever since I was a young girl I have always had a bad stomach. Last year, when I was 16, I decided to move to London. Circumstances became difficult, and I ended up becoming physically and mentally ill, which included anorexia nervosa and then onset depression and trauma, as well as almost crippling anxiety. Things led to me getting so ill that I went to a doctor who noticed that I had serious mouth ulcers—and this is what finally led them to diagnose me with celiac disease, after what seemed to be months of suffering.
    At the time my diagnosis seemed to make a lot of sense because of the stomach pains I had, especially after eating certain foods. My symptoms included much confusion, dire pains, and resulted in my having a phobia of food. As most celiacs know, currently there is no medicine available to treat celiac disease, and the only treatment is a strict gluten-free diet.
    I got diagnosed in late January 2016, and have been on a strict gluten-free diet ever since, and although I believe this has helped me a lot, more than nine months later, I still often have the same symptoms. They vary in levels and are sometimes uncomfortable and very painful. Sometimes I have migraines, stomach bloating, churning, etc., all of which are not very nice.
    Let me explain a little about what celiac is. It is an autoimmune disease where the immune system kills off tissue in the small intestine in response to ingesting gluten. This can make eating more difficult, and a lot of the time I am left in pain with nothing to do but sit in agony and wait for it to stop.
    But what if there was something else out there that could help with ongoing symptoms? I recently discovered that thousands are being helped by using cannabis to treat their celiac disease symptoms. Marijuana is gluten-free and for some, can ease the painful symptoms. Special note: This approach is NOT meant as a substitution for a guten-free diet, but for some people, like myself, it can offer additional symptom relief for those who need it.
    Reset.me has this posted:
    "Marijuana 'cools the gut,' in which it slows down the muscle contractions that move food through the stomach and intestines and reduces the secretion of liquid into the intestines associated with diarrhea (one of the most severe symptoms of the disease)," Deno writes. "Marijuana also controls the muscle spasms associated with diarrhea. It also increases appetite and can offset the inefficiency in the Celiac's ability to absorb nutrients from the food you eat."
    "People with celiac in some states in America are able to get access to to medical marijuana if they have chronic pain. The rest of us [celiacs] are left with buying illegally or simply avoiding this one plant that may be the most effective celiac treatment of all!"
    HelloMD.com states:
    "Inflammation can be suppressed by activating the cannabinoid receptors, CB2, on immune cells. Though there have not yet been clinical human trials, this study opens up new avenues to investigate as possible treatment options for autoimmune diseases. Though this study only looked at THC, CBD is also known to help the immune system. CBD helps repair the bodies [sic] ability to recognize the difference between normal internal body functions and foreign entities, keeping the body from attacking itself."
    Remember, Marijuana is not a cure, but is a natural anti-convulsant and can suppress seizure activity. It is also anti-inflammatory, and has helped people with other autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, Type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, and many others.
    I smoked cannabis even before I was diagnosed, and I always found that it settled my stomach. I have since spoken to many other people with celiac disease online and face to face, and I've done a fair amount of research to find out if there are other celiacs who experience the same relief from their symptoms.
    While doing my research, I came across an interesting post on Medhelp.org by Betherie Mommi about a girl with celiac who also suffers with IBS and has a history of chronic pain, nausea and, just like me, eating disorders. With such a weak stomach it's always hard to eat things without discomfort. She goes on to say that she uses medical marijuana becuase the meds that the doctors gave her have not helped with the pain and side effects of the medications, and the marijuana has also helped her appetite. She goes on to give one of the best descriptions of stomach pains, which I also get, but had difficulty explaining: "like velcro made out of razor blades being pulled apart in certain parts of your belly." She goes on to say that it also gave a sense of community back to her life, as you do sometimes feel excluded as a celiac, because there's a lot you have to miss out on. Betherie Mommi was a medical marijuana patient.
    I really notice the effects it has on me, and how it relieves my stomach pains, including providing relief from the confusion and anxiety that I've experienced. I feel that other people shouldn't have to go through what I've had to experience, and I really do believe that this is an exceptional way forward for some people.
    You can find CBD only "vapes", liquids, and waxes, which are also supposed to help, but in my case the THC, even if it is a low dosage, was essential to get rid of the pain.
    What I have described in this article is only what has helped me, after much suffering, and I urge all celiacs to do their own research and speak to their doctors before making a decision. I really believe that this approach could be helpful to so many others, but I also realize that it may not be for everyone.
    Sources:
    Cannabis May Cure Celiac Disease Can Cannabis Help Autoimmune Disease Sufferers? Medhelp.org

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/14/2018 - If you have celiac disease, and follow a gluten-free diet by medical necessity, you would likely never regard avoiding gluten as particularly sexy or attractive. Well, you would be wrong.
    Gluten-free eaters are getting more dates, more sex, and more orgasms, than their non-gluten-free counterparts, according to the online dating site Match.com.
    Results from the company's annual Singles in America survey indicate that gluten-free eaters are more than twice as likely to go on a date, and more than one-and-a-half times less likely to have a dating dry spell lasting two or more years.
    And when it comes to orgasms, well, of the 5,000 people who responded to the survey, those reporting orgasms are 43 percent more likely to be gluten-free.
    So, there you have it. Gluten-free is officially sexy.
    Still, exactly what might make gluten-free people sexier and more attractive than gluten eaters, your guess is as good as ours. We'll be happy to hear your thoughts in our comments section below.
    The survey also provided some interesting information on people's willingness to have sex with robots, and on their views about whether surreptitious robot sex constitutes cheating. Guys were twice as likely to be up for robot sex, but both men and women agree that hitting the robot on the side would be cheating.
    Read more at: SFGate.com

  • Recent Articles

    Tammy Rhodes
    Celiac.com 04/24/2018 - Did you know in 2017 alone, the United States had OVER TENS OF THOUSANDS of people evacuate their homes due to natural disasters such as fires, floods, hurricanes, tornadoes and tsunamis? Most evacuation sites are not equipped to feed your family the safe gluten free foods that are required to stay healthy.  Are you prepared in case of an emergency? Do you have your Gluten Free Emergency Food Bag ready to grab and go?  
    I have already lived through two natural disasters. Neither of which I ever want to experience again, but they taught me a very valuable lesson, which is why I created a Gluten Free Emergency Food Bag (see link below). Here’s my story. If you’ve ever lived in or visited the Los Angeles area, you’re probably familiar with the Santa Ana winds and how bitter sweet they are. Sweet for cleaning the air and leaving the skies a brilliant crystal blue, and bitter for the power outages and potential brush fires that might ensue.  It was one of those bitter nights where the Santa Ana winds were howling, and we had subsequently lost our power. We had to drive over an hour just to find a restaurant so we could eat dinner. I remember vividly seeing the glow of a brush fire on the upper hillside of the San Gabriel Mountains, a good distance from our neighborhood. I really didn’t think much of it, given that it seemed so far from where we lived, and I was hungry! After we ate, we headed back home to a very dark house and called it a night. 
    That’s where the story takes a dangerous turn….about 3:15am. I awoke to the TV blaring loudly, along with the lights shining brightly. Our power was back on! I proceeded to walk throughout the house turning everything off at exactly the same time our neighbor, who was told to evacuate our street, saw me through our window, assuming I knew that our hillside was ablaze with flames. Flames that were shooting 50 feet into the air. I went back to bed and fell fast asleep. The fire department was assured we had left because our house was dark and quiet again. Two hours had passed.  I suddenly awoke to screams coming from a family member yelling, “fire, fire, fire”! Flames were shooting straight up into the sky, just blocks from our house. We lived on a private drive with only one way in and one way out.  The entrance to our street was full of smoke and the fire fighters were doing their best to save our neighbors homes. We literally had enough time to grab our dogs, pile into the car, and speed to safety. As we were coming down our street, fire trucks passed us with sirens blaring, and I wondered if I would ever see my house and our possessions ever again. Where do we go? Who do we turn to? Are shelters a safe option? 
    When our daughter was almost three years old, we left the West Coast and relocated to Northern Illinois. A place where severe weather is a common occurrence. Since the age of two, I noticed that my daughter appeared gaunt, had an incredibly distended belly, along with gas, stomach pain, low weight, slow growth, unusual looking stool, and a dislike for pizza, hotdog buns, crackers, Toast, etc. The phone call from our doctor overwhelmed me.  She was diagnosed with Celiac Disease. I broke down into tears sobbing. What am I going to feed my child? Gluten is everywhere.
    After being scoped at Children's Hospital of Chicago, and my daughters Celiac Disease officially confirmed, I worried about her getting all the nutrients her under nourished body so desperately needed. I already knew she had a peanut allergy from blood tests, but just assumed she would be safe with other nuts. I was so horribly wrong. After feeding her a small bite of a pistachio, which she immediately spit out, nuts would become her enemy. Her anaphylactic reaction came within minutes of taking a bite of that pistachio. She was complaining of horrible stomach cramps when the vomiting set in. She then went limp and starting welting. We called 911.
    Now we never leave home without our Epipens and our gluten free food supplies. We analyze every food label. We are hyper vigilant about cross contamination. We are constantly looking for welts and praying for no stomach pain. We are always prepared and on guard. It's just what we do now. Anything to protect our child, our love...like so many other parents out there have to do every moment of ever day!  
    Then, my second brush with a natural disaster happened, without any notice, leaving us once again scrambling to find a safe place to shelter. It was a warm and muggy summer morning, and my husband was away on a business trip leaving my young daughter and me to enjoy our summer day. Our Severe Weather Alert Radio was going off, again, as I continued getting our daughter ready for gymnastics.  Having gotten used to the (what seemed to be daily) “Severe Thunderstorm warning,” I didn’t pay much attention to it. I continued downstairs with my daughter and our dog, when I caught a glimpse out the window of an incredibly black looking cloud. By the time I got downstairs, I saw the cover to our grill literally shoot straight up into the air. Because we didn’t have a fenced in yard, I quickly ran outside and chased the cover, when subsequently, I saw my neighbor’s lawn furniture blow pass me. I quickly realized I made a big mistake going outside. As I ran back inside, I heard debris hitting the front of our home.  Our dog was the first one to the basement door! As we sat huddled in the dark corner of our basement, I was once again thinking where are we going to go if our house is destroyed. I was not prepared, and I should have been. I should have learned my lesson the first time. Once the storm passed, we quickly realized we were without power and most of our trees were destroyed. We were lucky that our house had minimal damage, but that wasn’t true for most of the area surrounding us.  We were without power for five days. We lost most of our food - our gluten free food.
    That is when I knew we had to be prepared. No more winging it. We couldn’t take a chance like that ever again. We were “lucky” one too many times. We were very fortunate that we did not lose our home to the Los Angeles wildfire, and only had minimal damage from the severe storm which hit our home in Illinois.
      
    In 2017 alone, FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) had 137 natural disasters declared within the United States. According to FEMA, around 50% of the United States population isn’t prepared for a natural disaster. These disasters can happen anywhere, anytime and some without notice. It’s hard enough being a parent, let alone being a parent of a gluten free family member. Now, add a natural disaster on top of that. Are you prepared?
    You can find my Gluten Free Emergency Food Bags and other useful products at www.allergynavigator.com.  

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/23/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to learn whether celiac disease patients commonly suffer cognitive impairment at the time they are diagnosed, and to compare their cognitive performance with non-celiac subjects with similar chronic symptoms and to a group of healthy control subjects.
    The research team included G Longarini, P Richly, MP Temprano, AF Costa, H Vázquez, ML Moreno, S Niveloni, P López, E Smecuol, R Mazure, A González, E Mauriño, and JC Bai. They are variously associated with the Small Bowel Section, Department of Medicine, Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital; Neurocience Cognitive and Traslational Institute (INECO), Favaloro Fundation, CONICET, Buenos Aires; the Brain Health Center (CESAL), Quilmes, Argentina; the Research Council, MSAL, CABA; and with the Research Institute, School of Medicine, Universidad del Salvador.
    The team enrolled fifty adults with symptoms and indications of celiac disease in a prospective cohort without regard to the final diagnosis.  At baseline, all individuals underwent cognitive functional and psychological evaluation. The team then compared celiac disease patients with subjects without celiac disease, and with healthy controls matched by sex, age, and education.
    Celiac disease patients had similar cognitive performance and anxiety, but no significant differences in depression scores compared with disease controls.
    A total of thirty-three subjects were diagnosed with celiac disease. Compared with the 26 healthy control subjects, the 17 celiac disease subjects, and the 17 disease control subjects, who mostly had irritable bowel syndrome, showed impaired cognitive performance (P=0.02 and P=0.04, respectively), functional impairment (P<0.01), and higher depression (P<0.01). 
    From their data, the team noted that any abnormal cognitive functions they saw in adults with newly diagnosed celiac disease did not seem not to be a result of the disease itself. 
    Their results indicate that cognitive dysfunction in celiac patients could be related to long-term symptoms from chronic disease, in general.
    Source:
    J Clin Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 1. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0000000000001018.

    Connie Sarros
    Celiac.com 04/21/2018 - Dear Friends and Readers,
    I have been writing articles for Scott Adams since the 2002 Summer Issue of the Scott-Free Press. The Scott-Free Press evolved into the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. I felt honored when Scott asked me ten years ago to contribute to his quarterly journal and it's been a privilege to write articles for his publication ever since.
    Due to personal health reasons and restrictions, I find that I need to retire. My husband and I can no longer travel the country speaking at conferences and to support groups (which we dearly loved to do) nor can I commit to writing more books, articles, or menus. Consequently, I will no longer be contributing articles to the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. 
    My following books will still be available at Amazon.com:
    Gluten-free Cooking for Dummies Student's Vegetarian Cookbook for Dummies Wheat-free Gluten-free Dessert Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Reduced Calorie Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Cookbook for Kids and Busy Adults (revised version) My first book was published in 1996. My journey since then has been incredible. I have met so many in the celiac community and I feel blessed to be able to call you friends. Many of you have told me that I helped to change your life – let me assure you that your kind words, your phone calls, your thoughtful notes, and your feedback throughout the years have had a vital impact on my life, too. Thank you for all of your support through these years.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/20/2018 - A digital media company and a label data company are teaming up to help major manufacturers target, reach and convert their desired shoppers based on dietary needs, such as gluten-free diet. The deal could bring synergy in emerging markets such as the gluten-free and allergen-free markets, which represent major growth sectors in the global food industry. 
    Under the deal, personalized digital media company Catalina will be joining forces with Label Insight. Catalina uses consumer purchases data to target shoppers on a personal base, while Label Insight works with major companies like Kellogg, Betty Crocker, and Pepsi to provide insight on food label data to government, retailers, manufacturers and app developers.
    "Brands with very specific product benefits, gluten-free for example, require precise targeting to efficiently reach and convert their desired shoppers,” says Todd Morris, President of Catalina's Go-to-Market organization, adding that “Catalina offers the only purchase-based targeting solution with this capability.” 
    Label Insight’s clients include food and beverage giants such as Unilever, Ben & Jerry's, Lipton and Hellman’s. Label Insight technology has helped the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) build the sector’s very first scientifically accurate database of food ingredients, health attributes and claims.
    Morris says the joint partnership will allow Catalina to “enhance our dataset and further increase our ability to target shoppers who are currently buying - or have shown intent to buy - in these emerging categories,” including gluten-free, allergen-free, and other free-from foods.
    The deal will likely make for easier, more precise targeting of goods to consumers, and thus provide benefits for manufacturers and retailers looking to better serve their retail food customers, especially in specialty areas like gluten-free and allergen-free foods.
    Source:
    fdfworld.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/19/2018 - Previous genome and linkage studies indicate the existence of a new disease triggering mechanism that involves amino acid metabolism and nutrient sensing signaling pathways. In an effort to determine if amino acids might play a role in the development of celiac disease, a team of researchers recently set out to investigate if plasma amino acid levels differed among children with celiac disease compared with a control group.
     
    The research team included Åsa Torinsson Naluai, Ladan Saadat Vafa, Audur H. Gudjonsdottir, Henrik Arnell, Lars Browaldh, and Daniel Agardh. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Karolinska University Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institute, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Diabetes & Celiac Disease Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; and with the Nathan S Kline Institute in the U.S.A.
    First, the team used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to analyze amino acid levels in fasting plasma samples from 141 children with celiac disease and 129 non-celiac disease controls. They then crafted a general linear model using age and experimental effects as covariates to compare amino acid levels between children with celiac disease and non-celiac control subjects.
    Compared with the control group, seven out of twenty-three children with celiac disease showed elevated levels of the the following amino acids: tryptophan; taurine; glutamic acid; proline; ornithine; alanine; and methionine.
    The significance of the individual amino acids do not survive multiple correction, however, multivariate analyses of the amino acid profile showed significantly altered amino acid levels in children with celiac disease overall and after correction for age, sex and experimental effects.
    This study shows that amino acids can influence inflammation and may play a role in the development of celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764