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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/07/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    IS A LOW-GLYCEMIC PALEO DIET BENEFICIAL FOR CELIACS?


    Tina Turbin


    • Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2015 Issue


    Celiac.com 06/11/2016 - It's never become so clear to me how much our health and quality of life are dependent upon the food we eat since seeing myself, my family and more than my share of celiac friends and acquaintances make the transition to grain-free from gluten-free. This is evident in witnessing such positive results just from eating a biologically appropriate diet, the paleo diet, which is grain-free and thus gluten-free. Some have this simple diet termed as the caveman diet, the paleolithic diet and what-have you, but in essence it has been deemed "man's original" diet.


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    In my approaches to the topics of the paleo diet, I discovered the affects this diet has on man's health as a low glycemic alternative to man's diet, aiding ills and physical betterment through glycemic control. In my research and through working with many professionals over the years I've explored a variety of diet, health and lifestyle regimens and looked in depth into the prevailing topic of non-responsive celiacs, also known as refractory celiac disease.

    The paleo gluten-free diet is based on the premise that humans do best eating the foods our ancestors ate prior to the advent of agriculture and animal husbandry around 10,000 B.C. This proven theory is that modern humans do best on paleolithic nutrition because human genetics have largely remained the same since the pre-agricultural era, and thus our genetic makeup is best suited to the ancestral human diet—no grains at all. Taking our current bodies and then applying how man ate back in the day has been having profound effects on the general health and well-being within research and study results.

    According to research, pre-agricultural humans were free of the diseases of the civilized world such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, obesity, and autoimmune diseases. Modern studies, including clinical studies, have shown as well that eating paleo gluten-free can help or reduce risks of a variety of serious health conditions. This includes issues associated with high insulin and blood sugar levels, which can lead to a variety of diseases and health conditions such as hypertension, high cholesterol levels, obesity, type 2 diabetes and gout. That's because many foods on the paleo gluten-free diet are low-glycemic, which is evidenced in the ills they are void of, which we now classify as "normal" or aging, or an aging "disease".

    Grains are biologically similar to table sugar, causing an unhealthy spike in insulin upon consumption. Most of the carbohydrates consumed on the paleo gluten-free diet, consisting of a variety of vegetables, fruits, proteins and healthy fats are low-glycemic. Honey, maple syrups, etc. are currently debatable and this is another topic all together.

    What's the big deal about the Glycemic Index? According to studies, a low-glycemic diet can help with obesity, type 2 diabetes, polycystic ovarian syndrome, cardiovascular disease, as well as other conditions such as Alzheimer's, depression and non-responsive celiac disease. Some of the benefits of low glycemic eating include: improved weight loss, decreased hypoglycemia, steadier moods, mental clarity, sleep improvement, and reduced food cravings, which means less binge eating. This also means less overweight children with early onset diabetes, which is truly a rapidly growing concern.

    It is to our benefit that we all take a good look at our diets and the effects that the carbohydrate intake of the currently prevailing "standard" gluten-free diet has on our bodies. Let's determine if what we are eating could be causing health conditions that could possibly be reversed or avoided. Should we be willing to entertain the idea of change? The change could be as simple as taking a sincere look at man's original diet, the diet we were biologically designed to live on.

    Could our original diet of no grains, low carbohydrates and high "good" fats be a door we need to open, step through with our eyes wide open and be willing to learn about? I truly believe this topic answers many mysteries and unresolved diagnoses.



    Image Caption: Image: CC--brett jordan
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    Tina Turbin
    Celiac.com 12/29/2015 - I discussed the possibility of a Low Glycemic Paleo Diet as an entertaining idea as a beneficial diet for celiac in the last issue, Winter 2015. In closing, I stated I would reveal more about this topic in the coming issue. So, let's dive in and open our eyes to some facts and even some revealing possibilities that may very well help improve our health and quality of life.
    As a celiac myself, (2 of my three kids have celiac disease and my grandfather died from undiagnosed celiac disease) I was more than happy to follow the gluten-free diet diligently once finally diagnosed after many years of distress, bone loss, declining health not to mention non-stop bone aches, bowel inconsistency and severe lack of muscle tone. I will spare you further details but there was no doubt a major beneficial change that occurred once I eliminated all gluten from sources of wheat, rye and barley and all its "relatives" or any possible cross contamination. Eventually I was thrilled to be able to eat baked good substitutes that did not hurt my belly, cause my joints and bones to ache and were absolutely delicious and healthy, as they were gluten-free!
    Soon after I became an active advocate (and for many years) I was thrilled to be able to speak broadly to help raise awareness about celiac disease and the NEED for the gluten-free diet. I was also soon working closely with many gluten-free companies (as a tester, consultant and promoter) becoming blind to the fact that the boxes that were arriving to my door by the truckload were all desserts, loaded with carbohydrates and sugars.
    At the time I wrote and spoke often (in interviews and on radio) about Type 2 diabetes and celiac disease but never put two and two together. If lifestyle and diet change can address Type 2 permanently, what were these diet changes that were so effective? Also, even more to the point, why was Type 2 diabetes so common as a diagnosis after being diagnosed with celiac disease and going on the gluten-free diet?
    Research suggests an association between Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease, but there does not appear to be a link between celiac disease and type 2 diabetes. Type 2 is not an autoimmune disorder and doesn't share genes with celiac disease. According to the Celiac Sprue Association, individuals can be genetically predisposed to Type 2 diabetes, but those genes don't increase the risk of celiac disease.
    Let's look at the immense increased ingestion of glucose, sugars and carbohydrates and fiber while one is on the gluten-free diet by indulging in baked goods, desserts and grains! Gluten-free foods and grains are typically made with rice starch (or brown rice starch), tapioca starch, cornstarch and potato starch. All of which have virtually no fiber. Hence straight into the blood stream spiking the blood sugar bite after bite and quickly.
    The latest attempt is many companies and cooks trying to improve nutrients by baking with higher fiber gluten-free grains with higher nutrient value. Such as teff, millet, buckwheat etc. These are all still VERY HIGH in carbohydrates and very little fiber to slow the glycemic entrance into the blood system, still resulting in spiking the blood sugar rapidly. I must mention that most people do not just eat 2-3 bites of millet or a ¼ cup of cooked buckwheat. This would be easier on the body, but it seldom occurs.
    Carbohydrates are a type of nutrient in foods and some feel we need this to survive physically and some MD's are saying we need far less than we ever thought. The three basic forms are sugars, starches and fiber. Different types of carbohydrates have properties that affect how quickly your body digests them and how quickly glucose enters your bloodstream. When we eat or drink anything with carbs, the body breaks down the sugars and starches into a type of sugar called glucose. Glucose is the main source of energy for cells in the body. Fiber passes through your body undigested. The unused glucose for energy is quickly taken out of the blood stream by the insulin and "stocked" away in the cells for future energy as fat. It is the body's amazing way of survival.
    To elaborate a bit more, the two main hormones from the pancreas help regulate glucose in the bloodstream. Insulin moves glucose from the blood into the cells. Glucagon helps release glucose stored in your liver when the blood sugar (blood glucose) level is low.
    I suggest to anyone to take a look at the nutritional value on all packages and foods and get familiar with the amount of carbohydrates you are ingesting through your meals, snack and drinks. Get familiar with the carbohydrate, sugar and fiber levels in the food you buy and have in your home. Getting educated is the first step to learning and then you can make changes to suit your health and body goals.
    A healthy paleo or gluten-free diet is a low glycemic one at the very least. A low glycemic diet can improve all manner of current health situations. By statistics and more than abundant research, it will deter diseases quiet commonly associated with a high glycemic diet.
    We will expand on this topic next time.
    At this point I would like to refer you to some highly respected professionals and allow you to do further research and come to your own conclusions. Please look further into DrPerlmutter.com, Mercola.com, WheatBellyBlog.com, BulletProofExec.com, ChrisKresser.com, MarksDailyApple.com.
    As always, wishing you the best in your life and health!

    Lisa Cantkier
    Celiac.com 02/09/2016 - The top 8 food allergies in Canada are eggs, milk, peanuts, tree nuts, seafood, sesame, soy and wheat. If you have a food allergy and feel limited by it, it's a good idea to explore plant-based options. Plants offer so many benefits—they alkalize your body, reduce inflammation, beef up your vitamin, mineral, phytonutrient, antioxidant and fiber intake, and much more!
    And if you think that plant-based foods lack protein to get you going and keep you satisfied, guess again! Certain plant-based foods contain all of the essential amino acids we need and can completely replace animal protein.
    Here are four choices that are high in protein and loaded with additional nutrients. Enjoy each one in their whole form in a variety of ways—they are also available in flour form for baking!
    Amaranth
    Amaranth—a gluten-free grain that is high in fiber, manganese, magnesium and calcium—is a complete protein, containing all of the essential amino acids. It actually has more protein than quinoa, gram for gram—one cup of raw amaranth contains 28.1 grams of protein. Another benefit is that it can lower hypertension and cholesterol. Amaranth can be enjoyed as breakfast porridge, in muffins or as a side dish.
    Buckwheat Groats
    Buckwheat is the seed of a fruit in the rhubarb and sorrel family. Another complete protein that does not contain wheat or gluten despite its very misleading name, buckwheat is a great source of folate and zinc, which have both been shown to support fertility/virility in women and men. Both of these nutrients are also excellent for our immune system. Buckwheat is a good source of fiber and magnesium. It can be enjoyed for pancakes, as porridge or a side dish replacement to rice. One cup of raw buckwheat contains 22.5 grams of protein.
    Quinoa
    Quinoa functions like rice. Like amaranth and buckwheat, quinoa is also a complete protein. And like buckwheat, quinoa is technically not a true grain or member of the grass family either. Referred to as a "chenopod," quinoa is related to species such as beetroots, spinach and tumbleweeds. In addition to protein, quinoa contains many nutrients, including fiber, manganese, magnesium, phosphorus, folate, iron and zinc. Quinoa can be served in its whole form as a main or side dish, and quinoa flour is great in baked goods. One cup of raw quinoa contains 24 grams of protein.
    Teff
    Good things come in small packages! Last but not least, teff is the smallest grain in the world. Teff contains many amino acids and is high in protein—it just isn't a complete protein. It contains an excellent source of calcium, magnesium, zinc and iron, which are all important for immune function. Teff can be eaten as a hot cereal and is also available as tortilla wraps. One cup of raw teff contains 25.7 grams of protein.

    Curtiss Ann Matlock
    Celiac.com 03/30/2016 - The woman's voice, polite but firm came over the line: "We cannot accommodate your mother."
    "You can't accommodate her?" I wondered if I'd heard wrong.
    "No. We just had a team meeting and it was decided we cannot accommodate your mother because of her diet."
    "Oh." The line hummed as I took in both the news and the woman's frosty tone. The previous week the woman, the admissions coordinator of the nursing home, had been all warm and inviting, even eager to have my mother.
    Finally I came out with, "Well…thank you for letting me know," and the line clicked dead as the woman hung up.
    I had not seen this coming. I hadn't realized that a nursing home would, or could, turn down a patient based on the need for a therapeutic diet. I thought the reason for a nursing home was to care for ill people.
    When I toured the nursing home, the woman proudly proclaimed the facility as being on Newsweek's top recommended list, and gave the appearance of understanding my mother's gluten-free diet, saying, "My niece has told me of it. She's convinced me to eat more gluten-free." The woman went so far as to take notes on my mother's preferences, her love of sleeping in and drinking coffee, and then plopped in my arms a thick packet of Medicare forms. In all ways she had been exceedingly pleasant. Indeed everyone I met at the facility had been pleasant. Purring cats roamed the facility's hallways, birds sang from cages, and they even had a pot-bellied pig in the shade of a tree that could be seen through a window, all for the comfort of the patients. It struck me that they could do these many things for their patients, but feeding one small woman with celiac disease a gluten-free diet was beyond them.
    My mother is eighty-eight years old, a pixie with a contagious smile and genteel Southern manner. She was diagnosed with celiac disease at the age of seventy-five. At that time she was on daily use of a nebulizer, sleeping half days and could not leave home and the bathroom unless she took Imodium. The diagnosis and strict adherence to the gluten-free diet returned her to an active life. She took up painting and driving her aging neighbors out to enjoy shopping.
    A year ago, in rapid succession, a mass was found in one of her lungs, glaucoma took her sight and a stroke impaired her right hand and memory. For months, she required caregivers around the clock. Today she is mobile with the aid of a walker and can manage nights on her own. She can do one thing for herself, and that is get herself to and from the bathroom. Everything else must be done for her—bathing and dressing and maintaining clothes, medications, food preparation, working the television and her bedside radio. On occasion she will get confused and afraid, so I try not to leave her alone for more than an hour. With the aid of private caregivers and hospice assistance, I have been able to keep her in my home, where she has lived for the past six years. However, her funds are depleting for private care, and there is no one to help me care for her.
    After the disappointing phone call from the nursing home admissions coordinator, I sat thinking over all the above facts and allowing myself a sizable hissy fit. Then I gathered myself together and took another look at the nursing home facilities in my area.
    For the next two weeks, I sought more information and made lists. My plan was to be better prepared in knowledge and approach. Running on the theory that it is lack of knowledge that causes the fear of a situation, I put together information on my mother: a list of her conditions, needs and food preferences. Because of no longer having teeth, nor wearing dentures, and her advanced age, she needs soft foods, her favorites being eggs and Vienna sausage, puddings, bananas. At the time she would eat mashed chicken and some vegetables, all simple things. I wanted to reassure the admissions director and staff of the nursing facilities that my mother was easily cared for, and that I was willing to help with her food. I also had two brochures from Gluten Intolerance Group: a single sheet on celiac disease itself, and a color glossy brochure, put together in cooperation with the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness, entitled Celiac Disease in the Older Adult. I hoped to engage the interest of people whose primary aim and business is providing healthcare to the elderly.
    What I discovered is a general lack of any interest in the welfare of the elderly.
    The young woman admissions coordinator of my second choice of facilities, a modern, airy facility, answered my question about their kitchen and possible meeting with the dietary manager, with, more or less, "I've shown you around the building. I don't know what else you want to know." Then she added, "And right now we don't have any female beds available."
    At another facility, the admissions coordinator brushed aside any idea of speaking with the dietician. She did not know what celiac disease was, but assured me they could, "probably handle it."
    The best facility that I found had a waiting list of at least forty names. They stayed so full that they did not provide temporary respite care. Even so, the admissions coordinator showed me around the building, which was very old, and the sight of an elderly blind woman slumped uncomfortably in a wheelchair in the hallway haunted me. Yet their menu posted on the bulletin board seemed promising. "We do home-cooking," the coordinator said proudly. Then she glossed over my request to see their kitchen and meet the dietician. She admitted to never having heard of celiac disease, but said, "We've had many people with uncommon conditions," and put my mother's name on the waiting list. My eye followed her fingers working the pen far down the yellow legal pad. When I offered to leave the brochures about celiac disease with her, she did not even glance at them, but dismissed them with a sweeping wave, saying, "Oh, there's no need."
    Weeks passed. My mother's hospice social worker joined in on the search. She found a facility willing to give the respite stay a chance. "They've had a previous celiac patient," she said.
    By now I was quite skeptical, but also curious with this news. The facility she suggested was the closest near my home, and I could easily visit each day. I agreed to meet with the admissions coordinator.
    The woman said that, yes, the facility had had a previous patient with celiac disease. It was the experience with this patient, who had been uncooperative and would steal food off other patients' trays, that caused the hesitation on their part. "But we're told your mother wouldn't do that," she said.
    Upon studying the fact that my mother was quite incapable of snatching food anywhere, the admissions coordinator said they were willing to offer respite care. I was impressed (surprised is the better word) when the coordinator called the dietary manager to meet me. He read the diet listing I had made up for my mother and said they would have no trouble in providing for her. I volunteered to bring her favorites of chocolate pudding and canned peaches and Vienna sausage for times they might have things she could not eat, and of course any homemade gluten-free cakes.
    We packed my mother up, and she went for her week respite at the facility. Her long-time caregivers went as well to provide support in the strange environment, help her learn her way to the bathroom, and to circumvent the inevitable glitches.
    The first day for lunch in the dining room, my mother was brought Vienna sausages (which I had provided), nothing else. My mother's caregiver went to the kitchen and inquired of the cooks, surveyed the kitchen and the menu of baked chicken and broccoli and how it was cooked and said, "She can have that." We began to wonder how the previous patient had been fed. I also began to wonder if anyone even glanced at the diet I had printed for my mother.
    However, the glitches that week were small. My mother ate well, enjoying their broccoli and branching out to embrace canned spinach. We learned the main reason the facility could and did for that week, succeed in feeding my mother quite well was that they had a full working kitchen and did not rely on food service, where all the meals come prepackaged.
    The respite week also worked because of my mother's private caregivers. They monitored the food and educated the kitchen staff. The dietary manager went so far as to voice his gratitude to one of the caregivers for helping them learn what my mother and could not eat.
    While it appeared no one read any of the dietary information, over all the stay went well enough that a month later, I decided to try it for long term care. The plan was to have her private caregivers ease my mother through the transition for approximately a month, and then gradually reduce their hours, as the nursing home staff learned my mother's needs. We believed it possible to educate the staff.
    The first week went fairly smooth, with a few expected glitches. After that, things went downhill. A semi-soft diet had been requested; this never materialized. My mother's food would be placed on her tray in her room, and left, covered. Either my mother's private caregivers or I had to come in and help my mother eat. Mom's private caregivers continued to mash any meat and large chunks of vegetables, such as sweet potato served still in the skin. They continued to intercept sandwiches on bread and dishes of cake and snack cookies left on her tray. Throughout all of this, my mother's caregivers or I consulted with the dietary manager and the kitchen staff. We thanked them for the good food when it came. We explained again what she could and could not have. We formed the habit of checking each day's menu and writing out foods from that menu that my mother could eat. The kitchen staff accepted these menus and taped them near the stoves. When there was nothing on the menu that my mother could or would eat, we suggested easy canned substitutions. Sometimes she got these substitutions, sometimes not.
    Then came the day when I was told that for the evening meal my mother had been served a hotdog and fries of some sort, both too hard for her, or anyone, to eat. (Keep in mind we are paying for this food.) My mother's caregiver took her back to the room and served my mother her snack cakes and pudding I had provided. Her roommate shared in the cakes, because she had come in too late from her dialysis treatment to get dinner. Why her tray had not been saved for her, I have no idea. I had never seen this woman provided any sort of special diet, and she was both diabetic and had kidney disease.
    The following morning I also I learned one of the kitchen staff responsible for following the therapeutic diet said to my mother's caregiver: "Oh, she doesn't need that diet. That's all made up."
    I faced the fact that providing for my mother was too much trouble for the staff, and they were simply unwilling. My mother was never going to get the food nor the care in eating that she would require at this facility.
    As of this writing, my mother is back home. Private caregiver hours have been drastically reduced. I am able to do this, for now.
    Here are some chilling facts: Studies indicate that today in our country not only are the incidents of celiac on the rise in all age groups, but the median age for celiac diagnosis is just under 50 years of age, with one-third of newly diagnosed patients being over the age of 65.* (Celiac Disease in the Elderly, Shadi Rashtak, MD and Joseph A. Murray, MD)
    This is the age group who are the primary caregivers for themselves and their parents. This is the age group who more often must undergo surgeries and stays in rehabilitation nursing facilities.
    Couple the above figures with the fact that we are an aging population. At the current rate, the number of people age 65 and older is projected to double between now and 2050. The baby boomers, responsible for the great population growth, now average over the age of 65.* (An Aging Nation: The Older Population in the United States, by Jennifer M. Ortman, Victoria A. Velkoff, and Howard Hogan, U.S. Department of Commerce, Economics and Statistics Administration, U.S. Census Bureau.)
    These simple facts paint a picture of a growing challenge. We must be able to provide short and long term nursing home care for the many celiac patients around us today—my mother, myself, the number of over-60 celiacs I've talked to—as well as the tidal wave looming on the horizon.
    In addition, we have other food intolerances on the rise, and we have the needs of those with diabetes and kidney disease and other conditions requiring dietary restrictions. At present, all of these people, not only those with celiac, are being overlooked and discounted.
    I have no solid answers to this immense problem. I do have suggestions on things that can be started.
    The celiac community must recognize and begin to talk seriously about the problem of dietary care in nursing homes. Printing up a glossy brochure with the advice to have the doctor write an order for a therapeutic diet is a start. We have to step out more aggressively with ways to educate and implement therapeutic diets in a real way. We have programs in place educating restaurants and the food industry. Let's get aggressive with the health industry.
    Of course, my experience is that these facilities do not want to be educated. This is where legislation is required. We need to lobby for legislation that requires compliance in the nursing facility industry, in the same way that food labeling compliance was attained.
    Further, we need to support the push for legislation for a required number of CNAs per patient in nursing home facilities. At present, there are laws only governing the minimum number of RNs required per patient in nursing facilities. * (Minimum Nurse Staffing Ratios for Nursing Homes, Ning Jackie Zhang; Lynn Unruh; Rong Liu; Thomas T.H. Wan, Nurs Econ. 2006;24(2):78-85, 93.) There are no mandatory minimums for the number of CNAs, the people who actually do the bulk of the patient care—those who would monitor a person's diet and help that person to eat. At present the nursing home facility is allowed to choose for themselves the number of CNAs they need.
    I remarked to a friend that there were a number of camps for children with celiac disease, places the child could get away and enjoy and eat safely.
    "Well, what about for the elderly?" my friend said. "It seems if they can do it for kids, they could do it for the elderly."
    What about the elderly? This is our new challenge—to make certain those elderly people with food sensitivity needs are well cared for.

    Tina Turbin
    Celiac.com 05/17/2016 - The paleolithic diet, or paleo diet which happens to be gluten-free, has been growing increasingly popular among athletes and health advocates, but it has a history dating back to the mid-1970's as a means of preventing diseases and health conditions such as autoimmune diseases and cancer, when investigations were made of the eating patterns of our hunter-gatherer ancestors.
    The paleo gluten-free diet, the "biologically appropriate" diet, is named for the Paleolithic era, which extended 2.5 million years ending in 10,000 B.C. with the advent of agriculture and animal husbandry. It's comprised of the foods our human ancestors consumed during this period, namely wild-caught fish, grass-fed meats, fruits, vegetables, roots, and nuts. Any "modern" foods introduced from the agricultural era forward such as grains, dairy, sugar, and processed foods are eliminated.
    People all over have found the paleo gluten-free diet is an effective answer for weight loss, optimizing health and fitness—and building muscle tone. According to research, pre-agricultural humans were free of the diseases of the civilized world such as cardiovascular disease, cancer, obesity, and autoimmune diseases. Modern studies, including clinical studies, have shown as well that the paleo diet and the restoration of the lifestyle conditions of our ancestors, such as exercise, have resolved numerous diseases.
    The theory behind the diet, supported by extensive archeological and anthropological evidence, is based on the premise that modern humans do best on paleolithic nutrition because human genetics have largely remained the same since the pre-agricultural era and thus our genetic makeup is best suited to the ancestral human diet.
    If you're looking to build muscle tone, meet with a qualified health practitioner to see if the diet is for you. I think you'll find that whatever your reason for starting the paleo diet and lifestyle, whether to optimize your fitness routine, lose weight, alleviate autoimmune disease symptoms such as celiac disease, or increase your longevity, eating in the biologically appropriate way for our bodies not only has the power to change your body and your health, but your quality of life.
    While many people are eating paleo gluten-free as a way to correct health conditions or improve their overall health, active individuals and athletes have been following the diet in order to lose fat and build muscle more efficiently, according to MuscleMag.
    In fact, one of the best known proponents of the paleo diet, Robb Wolf, former biochemist and author of The Paleo Solution, regards the diet as performance-enhancing and trains world-class athletes at his gym in Chico, California.
    According to Robb, our human ancestors were taller, leaner, and better built than humans now, as anthropological evidence shows us. According to MuscleMag, only during the last 10,000 years, since the advent of agriculture, have humans consumed grains, legumes and dairy—and during this same period, humans have also become "significantly shorter, fatter, less muscular and more prone to disease," as anthropological studies point out. Let's take a look at some of the reasons why the paleo gluten-free diet is optimum for building muscle tone.
    The paleo gluten-free diet, consisting wholly of unprocessed foods like seafood, lean meat, fruits and vegetables, nuts and roots, is much more nutritious than the foods from the Neolithic era and beyond. The optimal nutritional intake on the paleo gluten-free diet is a vital part of developing muscle tone.
    Although you'll hear grain advocates singing the praises of the fiber and B vitamin content of grains, you'll actually find more of these nutrients in grain-free foods, as long as you eat a variety of nutrient-rich whole foods. According to GrainFreeLifestyle.com, "If you can find the nutrient in grain, you can find the nutrient in better quantities in other foods." For example, 100 grams of whole wheat flour contains 44 mcg of folate, but a 100-gram serving of lamb liver yields 400 mcg of folate and a 100-gram serving of yard-long beans offers 658 mcg. Also, 100 grams of cooked brown rice has 1.8 grams of dietary fiber, whereas a 100-gram serving of cooked collard greens has 2.8 grams and green peas offer approximately 5 grams of fiber per serving.
    In fact, grains that are poorly prepared, which is most often the case, can prevent the absorption of vitamins and minerals. Your diet may be rich in nutrients, but if it's also rich in improperly prepared grains, you won't be able to absorb them due to substances in grain such as phytic acid, which binds with minerals so you can't absorb them properly.
    Gluten is a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye. The paleo diet is a naturally gluten-free diet because it is a grain-free diet. Studies show that 1% of the population has celiac disease, an autoimmune condition triggered by the ingestion of gluten, which causes the immune system to attack the lining of the digestive tract and inhibits the proper absorption of nutrients from your food.
    But experts are saying that a large proportion of non-celiac individuals are suffering from gluten intake as well. Some researchers estimate that as much as 40% of the population is also sensitive or downright intolerant to gluten, which can lead to the same symptoms and conditions of celiac disease. Celiac disease and gluten sensitivity are severely undiagnosed, and it could be the case that you yourself have gluten issues.
    Not only grains but other Neolithic and modern foods, such as legumes, dairy products, sugar, and processed oils can irritate the digestive tract as well. For example, legumes contain antinutrients such as lectins, saponins, and protease inhibitors, which cause damage to the intestines and hormonal and immune systems, leading to inflammation and increasing the risk of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases. All soy products and peanuts are actually classified as legumes and are to be avoided on the paleo gluten-free diet.
    With intestinal inflammation, nutrient absorption is severely limited, especially when it comes to protein. Furthermore, the inflammatory response in the gut can spread throughout the body. This systemic inflammation can lead to the retaining of water as well as weakening the immune system, while a strong immune system is vital when it comes to recovering from intense exercise and building muscle.
    Let's dive into how to get superior sources of protein, weaning off of detrimental grains and improve muscle tone and exercise recovery time in the next issue.

    Tina Turbin
    Celiac.com 06/23/2016 - This is a very versatile gluten-free recipe. This paleo and gluten-free brownie pie crust can be made into a crust or simply eaten as gluten-free cookies. It is also totally OK to consume it raw since it is made out of all vegan ingredients. Based on the feedback I've received, it tastes delicious when prepared raw.
    This crust/cookie recipe is a wonderful base to build upon. I create a lot of raw cheesecakes with the crust and any leftovers are made into little cookies for later. The chocolate flavor in this is quite light so it won't overpower the other flavors you may want to work in with it.
    The only piece of machinery required is a food processor and this healthy recipe comes together easily. Nuts are the real star of this recipe though. I purchase nuts in bulk since I use them for homemade nut milk as well as many baked items and as an on-the-go snack. Certain nuts offer a variety of health benefits you would have never even thought of. Almonds for example, which are used in this recipe, rank highest out of all tree nuts in protein, fiber, calcium and vitamin E. Enjoy!
    Ingredients:
    2 cups almonds 1 cup pecans or walnuts 1 ½ cups dates, chopped ¼ cup 100% cacao powder 2 teaspoons vanilla extract ¼ teaspoon salt 2-4 teaspoons water Directions:
    Preheat oven to 325F degrees. Place almonds in food processor and grind until somewhat fine. Add pecans or walnuts and grind until somewhat fine. Add the remaining ingredients excluding water. Pulse in the food processor. Add water until mixture isn't flaky, just until dough holds slightly together. Line a 9” spring form pan with waxed paper. Add dough mixture to the pan and spread over the top of the paper. If you are doing crust up the sides of the pan, you will need to line the sides of the pan as well. Press firmly. Bake for 15-17 minutes. OPTIONAL: do not bake if you are on a raw diet. Enjoy!  

    Tina Turbin
    Celiac.com 07/05/2016 - This is hands down one of the easiest and most loved weekend recipes I whip up. Healthy, protein packed, sugar-free, gluten-free, paleo and satisfying. When I have the entire family over they always request this easy sausage and peppers recipe. It works for brunch, lunch or even dinner. I must warn you though, this will go fast. Make plenty of extra so you have leftovers as this gluten-free recipe is delicious heated back up.
    If I have everyone over for brunch I will usually make a homemade frittata to go with this or some sweet potato breakfast potatoes. Even my two Maltese pups go crazy over the aroma that emanates from my kitchen. They are always predictably there under my feet just in case "something" happens to drop.
    You can make this ahead of time, then heat it up in an oven safe dish too so you are not so rushed on the day of your get together.
    Enjoy!
    Ingredients:
    1 orange pepper 2 yellow peppers 2-3 packages of sausages (12-18 ounce packages) 2-4 tablespoons Olive oil Note: Green peppers are okay to use as well. Directions:
    Slice sausage 2-3 inches in thickness, diagonal cut is fine. Clean and then cut the peppers. Cut into 1-2 inch pieces. Heat large skillet with olive oil. Add sausage 2 cups at a time so as not to crowd. Stir now and then until they appear a tad bit charred. Add more oil only as necessary. Remove and do this with all of the sausage. Set all aside on paper towels to drain and pat with paper towel lightly. Add peppers to the same oil until they start to soften. Place all in a large, heat-proof skillet. Cover with tin foil. Place in oven for 30 minutes. Remove and serve. Enjoy! NOTE: can be served as a protein side to main dish; excellent for BBQ type meals and sit-down dinners.
    NOTE: Can be prepared days in advance. If so, place in fridge covered. Remove about 5 hours before eating time. Place in preheated oven at 350F for 40 minutes.
     

    Jim Swayze
    Celiac.com 09/08/2017 - For for the overwhelming majority of our time here on this planet we've all followed a paleo, or hunter-gatherer, diet. This is not a way of eating invented by the latest Hollywood guru – though truth be told there are now plenty of stars who eat this way. It's common sense, really, if you're able to unlearn a good portion of the dietary wisdom we've been force-fed over the last generation or two.
    Paleo means little more than, in the words of Ray Audette, what you could find to eat if you were "naked with a sharp stick.” And the foods you'd find would have to be, at least in theory (though usually not in practice), edible raw. So what foods would have been available to our ancestors?
    Meat, for sure. There are no known hunter gatherer populations who were vegetarian/vegan. Animal protein is vital to human health. Why then do we hear about healthy vegetarian diets? Because they are healthy as compared to the modern Western diet, with its ubiquitous high fructose corn syrup, artificial fats and sweeteners, and high-glycemic carbohydrates.
    Ok, so animal protein. What else could have been found by our ancestral hunter-gatherers? Fruit and true vegetables, in season.
    That's basically it: meat, fruit, vegetables. And of course, plenty of good, cold water.
    What did we not eat then? Grains in any form, gluten-free or not. Legumes, which are extremely toxic raw and have to be soaked and cooked in order to be edible. (Hint: peanuts are legumes!) New world foods like chocolate, coffee. The list goes on and you should have the hang of it by now. Again, the standard: foods edible raw that would have been available to our ancestors.
    Question: Would dairy have been available to our ancestors? The answer is clearly no, other than in the form of human breastmilk for the first few months or years of life. Bovine milk, meant for calf populations, is not a natural human food.
    Sound overly restrictive? Let me tell you today's menu: For breakfast, three eggs over easy with bacon and a glass of fresh-squeezed orange juice. Lunch was tuna on romaine lettuce with sliced almonds and a vinaigrette with iced green tea to drink. And dinner, a mere five minutes away, is grassfed flank steak lettuce-wrap tacos with roasted hatch green chile guacamole. And a nice glass of New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc.
    Give paleo a try. It's the ultimate gluten-free way of eating.

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/23/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to learn whether celiac disease patients commonly suffer cognitive impairment at the time they are diagnosed, and to compare their cognitive performance with non-celiac subjects with similar chronic symptoms and to a group of healthy control subjects.
    The research team included G Longarini, P Richly, MP Temprano, AF Costa, H Vázquez, ML Moreno, S Niveloni, P López, E Smecuol, R Mazure, A González, E Mauriño, and JC Bai. They are variously associated with the Small Bowel Section, Department of Medicine, Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital; Neurocience Cognitive and Traslational Institute (INECO), Favaloro Fundation, CONICET, Buenos Aires; the Brain Health Center (CESAL), Quilmes, Argentina; the Research Council, MSAL, CABA; and with the Research Institute, School of Medicine, Universidad del Salvador.
    The team enrolled fifty adults with symptoms and indications of celiac disease in a prospective cohort without regard to the final diagnosis.  At baseline, all individuals underwent cognitive functional and psychological evaluation. The team then compared celiac disease patients with subjects without celiac disease, and with healthy controls matched by sex, age, and education.
    Celiac disease patients had similar cognitive performance and anxiety, but no significant differences in depression scores compared with disease controls.
    A total of thirty-three subjects were diagnosed with celiac disease. Compared with the 26 healthy control subjects, the 17 celiac disease subjects, and the 17 disease control subjects, who mostly had irritable bowel syndrome, showed impaired cognitive performance (P=0.02 and P=0.04, respectively), functional impairment (P<0.01), and higher depression (P<0.01). 
    From their data, the team noted that any abnormal cognitive functions they saw in adults with newly diagnosed celiac disease did not seem not to be a result of the disease itself. 
    Their results indicate that cognitive dysfunction in celiac patients could be related to long-term symptoms from chronic disease, in general.
    Source:
    J Clin Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 1. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0000000000001018.

    Connie Sarros
    Celiac.com 04/21/2018 - Dear Friends and Readers,
    I have been writing articles for Scott Adams since the 2002 Summer Issue of the Scott-Free Press. The Scott-Free Press evolved into the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. I felt honored when Scott asked me ten years ago to contribute to his quarterly journal and it's been a privilege to write articles for his publication ever since.
    Due to personal health reasons and restrictions, I find that I need to retire. My husband and I can no longer travel the country speaking at conferences and to support groups (which we dearly loved to do) nor can I commit to writing more books, articles, or menus. Consequently, I will no longer be contributing articles to the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. 
    My following books will still be available at Amazon.com:
    Gluten-free Cooking for Dummies Student's Vegetarian Cookbook for Dummies Wheat-free Gluten-free Dessert Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Reduced Calorie Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Cookbook for Kids and Busy Adults (revised version) My first book was published in 1996. My journey since then has been incredible. I have met so many in the celiac community and I feel blessed to be able to call you friends. Many of you have told me that I helped to change your life – let me assure you that your kind words, your phone calls, your thoughtful notes, and your feedback throughout the years have had a vital impact on my life, too. Thank you for all of your support through these years.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/20/2018 - A digital media company and a label data company are teaming up to help major manufacturers target, reach and convert their desired shoppers based on dietary needs, such as gluten-free diet. The deal could bring synergy in emerging markets such as the gluten-free and allergen-free markets, which represent major growth sectors in the global food industry. 
    Under the deal, personalized digital media company Catalina will be joining forces with Label Insight. Catalina uses consumer purchases data to target shoppers on a personal base, while Label Insight works with major companies like Kellogg, Betty Crocker, and Pepsi to provide insight on food label data to government, retailers, manufacturers and app developers.
    "Brands with very specific product benefits, gluten-free for example, require precise targeting to efficiently reach and convert their desired shoppers,” says Todd Morris, President of Catalina's Go-to-Market organization, adding that “Catalina offers the only purchase-based targeting solution with this capability.” 
    Label Insight’s clients include food and beverage giants such as Unilever, Ben & Jerry's, Lipton and Hellman’s. Label Insight technology has helped the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) build the sector’s very first scientifically accurate database of food ingredients, health attributes and claims.
    Morris says the joint partnership will allow Catalina to “enhance our dataset and further increase our ability to target shoppers who are currently buying - or have shown intent to buy - in these emerging categories,” including gluten-free, allergen-free, and other free-from foods.
    The deal will likely make for easier, more precise targeting of goods to consumers, and thus provide benefits for manufacturers and retailers looking to better serve their retail food customers, especially in specialty areas like gluten-free and allergen-free foods.
    Source:
    fdfworld.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/19/2018 - Previous genome and linkage studies indicate the existence of a new disease triggering mechanism that involves amino acid metabolism and nutrient sensing signaling pathways. In an effort to determine if amino acids might play a role in the development of celiac disease, a team of researchers recently set out to investigate if plasma amino acid levels differed among children with celiac disease compared with a control group.
     
    The research team included Åsa Torinsson Naluai, Ladan Saadat Vafa, Audur H. Gudjonsdottir, Henrik Arnell, Lars Browaldh, and Daniel Agardh. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Karolinska University Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institute, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Diabetes & Celiac Disease Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; and with the Nathan S Kline Institute in the U.S.A.
    First, the team used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to analyze amino acid levels in fasting plasma samples from 141 children with celiac disease and 129 non-celiac disease controls. They then crafted a general linear model using age and experimental effects as covariates to compare amino acid levels between children with celiac disease and non-celiac control subjects.
    Compared with the control group, seven out of twenty-three children with celiac disease showed elevated levels of the the following amino acids: tryptophan; taurine; glutamic acid; proline; ornithine; alanine; and methionine.
    The significance of the individual amino acids do not survive multiple correction, however, multivariate analyses of the amino acid profile showed significantly altered amino acid levels in children with celiac disease overall and after correction for age, sex and experimental effects.
    This study shows that amino acids can influence inflammation and may play a role in the development of celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/18/2018 - To the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service animals.
    If you’ve flown anywhere lately, you may have seen them. People flying with their designated “emotional support” animals. We’re not talking genuine service animals, like seeing eye dogs, or hearing ear dogs, or even the Belgian Malinois that alerts its owner when there is gluten in food that may trigger her celiac disease.
    Now, to be honest, some of those animals in question do perform a genuine service for those who need emotional support dogs, like veterans with PTSD.
    However, many of these animals are not service animals at all. Many of these animals perform no actual service to their owners, and are nothing more than thinly disguised pets. Many lack proper training, and some have caused serious problems for the airlines and for other passengers.
    Now the major airlines are taking note and introducing stringent requirements for service animals.
    Delta was the first to strike. As reported by the New York Times on January 19: “Effective March 1, Delta, the second largest US airline by passenger traffic, said it will require passengers seeking to fly with pets to present additional documents outlining the passenger’s need for the animal and proof of its training and vaccinations, 48 hours prior to the flight.… This comes in response to what the carrier said was a 150 percent increase in service and support animals — pets, often dogs, that accompany people with disabilities — carried onboard since 2015.… Delta said that it flies some 700 service animals a day. Among them, customers have attempted to fly with comfort turkeys, gliding possums, snakes, spiders, and other unusual pets.”
    Fresh from an unsavory incident with an “emotional support” peacock incident, United Airlines has followed Delta’s lead and set stricter rules for emotional support animals. United’s rules also took effect March 1, 2018.
    So, to the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service and emotional support animals.
    Source:
    cnbc.com