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  • Amie  Valpone
    Amie  Valpone

    Fabulous Lemon Basil Millet Burgers with Mango Salsa

      Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Winter 2016 Issue - Originally published January 5, 2016

    Celiac.com 04/05/2016 - These fresh-tasting burgers make an easy weeknight meal. No buns here; you can serve these wrapped in romaine or Bibb lettuce leaves and eat them with your hands. Make sure your millet isn't too dry or the burgers won't stick together!

    Serves 6

    Ingredients:
    • 1 cup millet
    • ½ teaspoon sea salt, plus a pinch for cooking millet
    • 1 tablespoon ground flax seeds
    • 3 tablespoons water
    • 1 large carrot, peeled and grated
    • 4 scallions, thinly sliced
    • 1 handful fresh basil leaves, finely chopped
    • 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice
    • 2 ½ teaspoons freshly grated lemon zest
    • ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
    • 3 tablespoons coconut oil
    • 6 large romaine or Bibb lettuce leaves
    • 1 recipe Mango Salsa, for serving
    • Large drizzle Cumin Cashew Cream Sauce, for serving

    Directions:
    Cook the millet with a pinch of salt. Set aside to cool.

    Combine the flax seeds and water in a small bowl; set aside for 10 minutes until the mixture forms a gel, then mix well.

    While the millet is cooking, combine the carrots, scallions, basil, lemon juice, lemon zest, salt, and pepper in a large bowl. Once the millet is cool, add it to the bowl with the flax seed mixture and mix well. Using your hands, shape the mixture into six burgers.

    In a large skillet, heat the oil over medium heat. Place the burgers in the pan and cook until golden brown, 7 to 8 minutes on each side. Serve warm wrapped in lettuce leaves with a dollop of Mango Salsa and a drizzle of Cumin Cashew Cream Sauce on top. Uncooked burgers will keep for up to 4 days in the refrigerator or 1 month in the freezer, stored between pieces of parchment paper in a sealed container.

    Mango Salsa

    Makes 1 ½ cups

    Ingredients:

    • 1 ripe mango, peeled, pitted, and finely diced
    • 1 medium English cucumber, finely diced
    • 3 tablespoons finely diced red onion
    • 3 teaspoons finely chopped fresh cilantro
    • 2 teaspoons freshly squeezed lime juice
    • Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste

    Directions:
    Combine all of the ingredients in a large bowl; toss to combine, and serve. Add more red onion, if desired, for a spicier salsa. Serve immediately.

    Cumin Cashew Cream Sauce

    Makes 1 ½ cups

    Ingredients:
    1 cup raw cashews
    ¾ cup water
    ¼ cup freshly squeezed lemon juice
    ½ teaspoon ground cumin
    ¼ teaspoon sea salt

    Directions:
    Combine all of the ingredients in a blender and blend until smooth. Serve chilled or at room temperature. Store leftover sauce in a sealed container in the refrigerator for up to 5 days.

    Text excerpted from EATING CLEAN, © 2016 by AMIE VALPONE. Reproduced by permission of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. All rights reserved. Author/Recipe photo © LAUREN VOLO.



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  • About Me

    Amie Valpone, HHC, AADP is a Manhattan based Personal Chef, Culinary Nutritionist, Professional Recipe Developer and Food Writer specializing in easy Gluten-Free and Dairy-Free recipes. Amie is the Editor-in-Chief of the gluten-free blog, The Healthy Apple. Amie shares her passion for and approach to "Clean Eating" by focusing on natural, whole foods and ingredients that are good for you and your body. Amie works with Whole Foods Market as their Gluten-Free Manhattan Cooking Instructor and is a Gluten-Free Industry Innovator when it comes to helping clients, the community, companies and client live a healthy and happy life. Visit her site at: thehealthyapple.com.

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    So i recently had a baby and 3 months postpartum I started celery juicing and after juicing my stomach would be in so much pain. So I stopped it for a while and a whole month no pain or issues. I made an apt with a GI doctor to just get my blood work checked everything came back great except the Ema it was 1:20 he said it was strange because all the other Celiac panel test were negative my Ttg and the genetic screening even. So I made an apt with another doctor for second opinion she stated
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    So i recently had a baby and 3 months postpartum I started celery juicing and after juicing my stomach would be in so much pain. So I stopped it for a while and a whole month no pain or issues. I made an apt with a GI doctor to just get my blood work checked everything came back great except the Ema it was 1:20 he said it was strange because all the other Celiac panel test were negative my Ttg and the genetic screening even. So I made an apt with another doctor for second opinion she stated that
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