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    Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Judge Tosses Hasselbeck Plagiarism Suit, Woman Sues Again!

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 12/02/2009 - It's off-again, on-again for the plagiarism lawsuit against Elisabeth Hasselbeck, co-host of TV's The View.

    Recently, a judge dismissed a plagiarism suit against Elisabeth Hasselbeck for her book called The gluten-free Diet: A Gluten-Free Survival Guide. The judge threw out the original complaint because a rival celiac disease author, Susan Hassett, failed to provide supporting documentation for her claim.



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    Barely two weeks later, Hassett, author of the self-published, Living With Celiac Disease author, has filed a second lawsuit, in U.S. District Court in Massachusetts, alleging copyright infringement. Hasselbeck's book is published by Center Street press, and made the New York Times Bestseller list.

    Hassett contends that the judged tossed her first plagiarism suit on a technicality, and that this time, she has included ample evidence to support her claim that Hasselbeck stole from her her "scrupulously researched" book.

    For her part, Hasselbeck has called the charge of plagiarism and copyright infringement "baseless." In addition to the plagiarism charge, Hassett has added an allegation that Hasselbeck includes information in her book that is "misleading and dangerous" to Celiac Disease sufferers.

    Hassett claims that she sent a copy of her book to Hasselbeck well before Hasselbeck's book was released, and that Hasselbeck has wrongly borrowed from Hassett's book. Whether Hasselbeck's ghostwriter ever saw the book remains unknown.

    Stay tuned for updates on this intriguing and ever-changing story.



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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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    Scott Adams
    The following is a post by Donald D. Kasarda (kasarda@pw.usda.gov) that was written to Michael Coupland of Kellogg (Cereal Company).
    Dear Michael,
    I have been asked to comment on your reply to Bev Lewis about the absence of gluten (or the barley equivalent) in malt flavoring. I am a cereal chemist who is sometimes asked for advice in regard to the gluten proteins as they relate to celiac disease by celiac patient organizations. I have provided advice to Kellogg in the past in regard to safe processing of a rice cereal (Kenmei) in order to avoid contamination. Kenmei has since been discontinued by the company.
    While it is possible that the malt flavoring you refer to is free of all harmful peptides, your statement that because the flavoring is a water wash of malt, it is free of gluten, is not in itself completely satisfying for the following reasons.
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    Therefore, the water wash could pick up harmful hordein peptides. Furthermore, unless the wash was centrifuged or filtered to clarify it, it could pick up small amounts of suspended particles that could contain hordein proteins or fragments of them that resulted from the protease action during germination.
    The amounts of harmful peptides or proteins that end up in a malt-flavored cereal might well be insignificant for celiac patients, for, after all, the amounts in the wash are likely to be small and the amount of flavoring added to the cereal is probably a small part of the total solids. My main point is that some transfer of harmful peptides to the water wash could occur and unless your researchers have studied this question and have some basis for concluding that the amounts are insignificant (other than because a water wash was used), perhaps it would be best to indicate that some uncertainty still exists.
    Incidentally, my suspicion is that there is not enough of the harmful peptides in Rice Krispies to cause harm to celiac patients, but for me it is only a suspicion in that I know of no experimental measurements or calculations in regard to the question and we still do not have a really solid indication of how little of the harmful proteins or peptides is OK for celiac patients on a daily basis.
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    By Kelly Rohlfs Celiac.com 09/29/2004 - The Childrens Digestive Health and Nutrition Foundation (CDHNF) with the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition (NASPGHAN) announced the launch of a new educational campaign on Celiac Disease, one of the most common genetic digestive conditions possibly affecting as many as three million Americans (up to 1 percent). Since it has been proven that early detection and intervention can prevent long-term consequences, CDHNF and NASPGHAN are focusing on accurate and timely diagnosis and treatment in children.
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/17/2011 - Gluten-free eating is playing a key role in the diets of major A-list celebrities. Among them, Lady Gaga, Russell Crowe, and Jennifer Esposito all have made gluten-free eating a major part of their health and diet routines.
    Russell Crowe has reportedly dropped more than 16 pounds by following a strict exercise regime and eating a diet that is largely gluten-free.
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    Catch up on the latest gluten-free news for Russell Crowe.
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    Gibson goes on to say that Lady Gaga doesn’t just focus on her own diet, but that she expects her dancers to follow her regimen as well. Lady Gaga, Gibson adds, is a workaholic, and "doesn’t want gluten and bread bloating or weighing down her dancers."
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/07/2014 - Our latest gluten-free celebrity news comes with word from eon line.com that actress Jennifer Esposito has sparked a bit of a dustup with Rachael Ray over an episode of Ray's 3 in the Bag that aired earlier this month on Food Network, in which Ray shared some favorite gluten-free recipes.
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    Source:
    eonline


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