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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Justin Bieber Ditches Corona Beer for Omission in Response to Gluten Intolerance

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      Pop star Justin Beiber gives up Corona for gluten-free beer after learning he has gluten intolerance.


    Caption: Image: CC BY-SA 2.0--jbarta

    Celiac.com 10/29/2019 - It's a busy time for Just Bieber. Within a couple of weeks, the pop recording sensation got married, suffered a minor car accident, and revealed that he'll be giving up his favorite beer, Corona, in favor of gluten-removed beers, like Omission. The reason? Bieber just learned that he is "allergic" to gluten. 

    "Worst news ever I'm officially allergic to gluten," Bieber revealed via Instagram Story, "No more Coronas unless they make gluten free beer like this! Sad day."

    Speaking favorably about his newest favorite brew, the "I Don't Care" singer said the the gluten-free pale ale from Omission Brewing is "actually fire."

    It's not clear whether Bieber actually has celiac disease, or whether he has a non-celiac gluten sensitivity.

    Just in time for Oktoberfest, here's a list of gluten-free and gluten-removed beers that can help quench your thirst and maintain your gluten-free diet, Along with a list of some excellent gluten-free beers and ciders.

    In addition to bringing his fans in the Belieber Nation up to speed on his switch to gluten-free brew, Bieber has been posting lots of photos of him and his new bride, Hailey, along with hinting that he may be looking to upgrade his current home for something more suitable for a married man.

    Read more in TheBlast.com


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    “Gluten removed beer” still gets me, but so does gluten-free oats. Wouldn’t someone with a gluten allergy be more immediately affected by low ppm gluten content than a celiac?  I can’t see how this is ingesting without harm for either population. Please advise. 

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    Please do not take advice from a non-celiac disease publication — the Blast.     Gluten-removed beers are hugely controversial in the celiac disease world.  This article should be removed fro celiac.com.  Another example of shoddy journalism.  

    Read real news from celiac disease organizations linked with celiac disease research centers.  

    https://gluten.org/branchnews/gigbeerstudy/

    Edited by cyclinglady

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    On 10/29/2019 at 4:49 PM, cyclinglady said:

    Please do not take advice from a non-celiac disease publication — the Blast.     Gluten-removed beers are hugely controversial in the celiac disease world.  This article should be removed fro celiac.com.  Another example of shoddy journalism.  

    Read real news from celiac disease organizations linked with celiac disease research centers.  

    https://gluten.org/branchnews/gigbeerstudy/

    The study you refer to here definitely has issues. Clearly when "two active-CD patient samples gave responses to the rice flour extract" that was used as a control, you cannot then claim in the same study that the 3 out of 31 celiacs who reacted to gluten-removed beer is statistically more significant than the two who reacted to the rice flour, can you? Clearly there is an issue with how the study was set up and run.

    • "Three active CD patients showed a response to barley and the gluten-removed beer, and again, none of the non-celiac control subjects showed this reaction pattern"

    If we can conclude after 90% of celiacs in the study DID NOT have a measurable reaction to gluten-removed beers, but because 3 might have (we really don't know what else these subjects were eating during this study, because it doesn't really talk about this) that gluten-removed beers are not safe, then can't we also conclude that rice flour is unsafe for celiacs, because "two active-CD patient samples gave responses to the rice flour extract"?

    Since the rice flour control used in this study produced similar antibody reactions as the gluten-removed beer (7% vs 10%), I don't think you can conclude anything from this study other than the subjects were not all eating a gluten-free diet while participating in the study, because rice is definitely gluten-free.

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    On 10/29/2019 at 4:49 PM, cyclinglady said:

    Please do not take advice from a non-celiac disease publication — the Blast.     Gluten-removed beers are hugely controversial in the celiac disease world.  This article should be removed fro celiac.com.  Another example of shoddy journalism.  

    Read real news from celiac disease organizations linked with celiac disease research centers.  

    https://gluten.org/branchnews/gigbeerstudy/

    It's true that US labeling laws don't allow gluten-removed beers to be labeled "gluten-free." However, the Europeans have led the way on gluten-free standards and labeling for more than two decades now, always being at the forefront of technology. The beers are labeled gluten-free in Europe. They are most certainly gluten-free, and likely safe for people with celiac disease. The study you site has a tiny population size, and since two of the controls reacted to rice flour, the study should simply be disregarded. Interestingly, the data show that 90% of people tolerate gluten-removed beers just fine. The only controversy comes from the small number of people who claim not to tolerate such beers. Gluten-removed beers are not remotely controversial for the vast majority of people with celiac disease who drink beer.

     

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    Thank you for all the information and the discussion on “gluten removed” labeling. I’m skeptical of any labels referring to gluten and ALWAYS look at the ingredients. The ignorance of servers who boldly state the distillation process removes the gluten in certain liquors is dangerous. For some reason the population seems to lose common sense when alcohol is the topic. If something is made from gluten containing grains, it will undoubtedly illicit an autoimmune response. Ultimately we are responsible for what we put in our mouths. Conversations like this are as valuable as research we do on our own. 

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    23 minutes ago, NNowak said:

    Thank you for all the information and the discussion on “gluten removed” labeling. I’m skeptical of any labels referring to gluten and ALWAYS look at the ingredients. The ignorance of servers who boldly state the distillation process removes the gluten in certain liquors is dangerous. For some reason the population seems to lose common sense when alcohol is the topic. If something is made from gluten containing grains, it will undoubtedly illicit an autoimmune response. Ultimately we are responsible for what we put in our mouths. Conversations like this are as valuable as research we do on our own. 

    Distillation is different.  Distilled alcohol is safe as gluten doesn’t float up in steam.  it’s just science.  But I can understand not wanting to eat or drink things that come from wheat, even when it’s actually gluten-free.  
     

    Beer isn’t distilled.  So the above  very basic explanation, does not apply.
     

     

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    Distilled spirits, no matter their source, are gluten-free. This, of course, would exclude any additions of gluten made after the distillation process is completed.

    In the case of gluten-reduced beer, they add special enzymes which break down all particles and renders them harmless. I've not see any scientific evidence that such beers contain any harmful gluten, gliadin, or other particles that would harm celiacs, which is why they can be labelled "gluten-free" in Europe. 

    In the USA labeling rules automatically exclude anything from being labelled "gluten-free" if it includes a gluten containing ingredient that has been rendered gluten-free, so, for example, even a vodka that is triple distilled from wheat and is 100% gluten-free could not be labelled as gluten-free in the USA.

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    As a celiac of 24 years, the science behind the distillation process does not convince my body the spirits are gluten-free when the original source is from a gluten containing grain. I’ve had enough chemistry in college to understand the theory, but my body isn’t buying it. DH, migraines and an increase in gastro issues occur without fail. Perhaps the autoimmune response has a lower threshold in some people, but gluten is gluten regardless of the ppm in a product. Ultimately we are responsible for what we put in our mouths and the consequences of such. 

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    On 10/31/2019 at 10:22 AM, Scott Adams said:

    The study you refer to here definitely has issues. Clearly when "two active-celiac disease patient samples gave responses to the rice flour extract" that was used as a control, you cannot then claim in the same study that the 3 out of 31 celiacs who reacted to gluten-removed beer is statistically more significant than the two who reacted to the rice flour, can you? Clearly there is an issue with how the study was set up and run.

    • "Three active celiac disease patients showed a response to barley and the gluten-removed beer, and again, none of the non-celiac control subjects showed this reaction pattern"

    If we can conclude after 90% of celiacs in the study DID NOT have a measurable reaction to gluten-removed beers, but because 3 might have (we really don't know what else these subjects were eating during this study, because it doesn't really talk about this) that gluten-removed beers are not safe, then can't we also conclude that rice flour is unsafe for celiacs, because "two active-celiac disease patient samples gave responses to the rice flour extract"?

    Since the rice flour control used in this study produced similar antibody reactions as the gluten-removed beer (7% vs 10%), I don't think you can conclude anything from this study other than the subjects were not all eating a gluten-free diet while participating in the study, because rice is definitely gluten-free.

    I was not disputing the study.  I said that gluten-removed beers are a controversial topic within the celiac community.  I suggested that celiacs or NCGS patients follow the recommendations of celiac research centers or non-profit organizations who work with celiac research centers.  My link to one celiac organization was just one example, but you can find others.  If you can find one celiac research center or affiliated celiac disease non-profit organization that states that gluten-reduced beers are safe, then please provide the links.  I would really appreciate it.  

    My dispute is that the author passed on an article based on a news feed where the source is questionable.  A site that promotes celebrities and entertainment, is not the best place to get health information in my personal opinion.  

    https://theblast.com/

    It is unfortunate that most celiac disease studies concerning dietary issues are tiny and underfunded.    Even the original celiac study that helped determine FDA gluten free guidelines was tiny (less than 50 participants).  

     

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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