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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Kellogg's Eggo Waffles Now Gluten-free!

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Caption: Image: Kellogg's Corporation.

    Celiac.com 03/06/2015 - The Kellogg Co. has announced the launch of Eggo Gluten Free Waffles in both original and cinnamon flavors.

    Coming on the heels of General Mill’s move to take Cheerios gluten-free, the announcement marks the latest move by major cereal manufacturers into the realm of gluten-free products.

    Eggo Gluten Free Waffles are available nationwide in the frozen food aisle of grocery stores.

    The gluten-free waffles contain eight vitamins and minerals and are considered an excellent source of calcium and iron, with 25% daily value of each. They also contain 15 grams of whole grains per 70-gram serving.

    Kellogg's is taking special care to make their new gluten-free waffles "delicious and wholesome," and to avoid the pitfall of gluten-free products which "…sometimes sacrifice taste and texture compared with their original versions," said AnneMarie Suarez-Davis, vice-president of marketing and innovation for Kellogg’s Frozen Foods.

    For more information, check out Kelloggs.com.

     


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    I went to the Kellogg website and found that the Eggo gluten-free waffles contain oat flour, which I don't consider to be gluten free (even the ones that are listed as gluten-free). I'm disappointed.

    Oats are gluten-free unless cross-contaminated. Some celiacs (about 8%) have adverse reactions to oats. That has nothing to do with gluten. Most celiacs can safely tolerate oats. That's why Kellogg's can label them gluten-free, in accordance with FDA standards.

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    My daughter has celiac and we tried these new waffles to give her something "normal" but by lunch time she was complaining about stomach pain. As it was the only thing different in her regular meal items, we highly suspect these waffles do contain gluten.

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    My daughter has celiac and we tried these new waffles to give her something "normal" but by lunch time she was complaining about stomach pain. As it was the only thing different in her regular meal items, we highly suspect these waffles do contain gluten.

    Thanks for your comment. As always, it is important to gauge your own intolerance level, or those of your kids, in this case, to determine what works best for your body. About 8% of celiacs experience an adverse reaction when eating oats. As for the idea that the waffles contain gluten, I would be highly surprised if that were true. Kellogg's has invested large sums of money to create a gluten-free supply chain for this product, and the potential liability would likely pressure them to get it right. I would be on an oat intolerance, though you might need to talk with a doctor or sort it out through an elimination diet.

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    Happy to hear that there will be a gluten-free product that is also fortified, as are most wheat products. The one thing that I would have liked to read is whether this product is certified gluten-free (which I interpret to mean that they use dedicated equipment, etc., to avoid all cross contamination for celiac patients). Can that assumption be made when a large national brand introduces a gluten-free product, or am I just making an @$$ out of myself?

    Here is the response I got from Kellog regarding my daughter getting sick every time she ate these, where they flat out state they can not guarantee their oats are free from gluten contamination...if you cant guarantee it then its NOT gluten-free!

    We will not trust any Kellog gluten-free products now...

     

    Dee,

    We are so glad you took the time to connect with us. Your interest in Kellogg's® Eggo® Gluten Free waffles - Original is appreciated and we are happy to share more information about Gluten with you.

     

    Oats are considered a gluten-free food, but our oats may contain gluten as a result of cross-contamination with other gluten-containing grains during processing. All of our Gluten Free products and manufacturing facilities that produce Gluten Free products undergo a comprehensive assessment and qualification to ensure compliance to regulations regarding labeling gluten free foods. Products tested gluten-free must contain less than 20 parts per million of gluten.

     

    I am so sorry to hear about your daughter becoming ill after comsuming these. I hope you are able to find another one of our deliciouse products for her. The ingredient list on each package will always show if the product contains Oats or Oat flour. Below are some of the options we have available, however as ingredients can change, please be sure to always read the nutrtion label.

     

    • Kellogg's® Rice Krispies® Gluten Free cereal made with whole grain brown rice<

    • Kellogg's® Fruit Flavored Snacks<

    • Kellogg's® Special K® Breakfast Shakes<

     

     

    Thank you again. We hope this information answers your question completely. If there is anything else we can help you with, please contact us again by calling 1-800-962-1413. You can also visit us online at www.kelloggs.com to learn more about our foods and determine which ones would work best for you.

     

    If you have additional comments or a photo to send to us, click here.

    Please do not use your “reply†button to respond to this e-mail. Replies to this message are routed to an unmonitored mailbox.

     

    Sincerely,

     

    Jamie B.

    Consumer Specialist

    Consumer Affairs

     

    028347246A

     

    Dee wrote:

    Is the oat flour that is in your gluten free waffles made from uncontaminated oats? My Celiac daughter was so excited to try these..unfortunately EVERY time she eats them she gets sick.. She usually avoids oats, however we decided to try the product since it was labeled gluten free,,we assumed the oat flour was made from safe oats..I'm tending to think it was not...

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    I went to the Kellogg website and found that the Eggo gluten-free waffles contain oat flour, which I don't consider to be gluten free (even the ones that are listed as gluten-free). I'm disappointed.

    Me too! I react to oats exactly the same way i react to gluten. Now I have to search everything labeled gluten-free for oats or oat flours.

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    Too bad Kellogg's is not selling gluten free Rice Krispies any more. Frustrating when you find a product that is good and my celiac granddaughter could eat--and now is not available.

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    My daughter has celiac. She ate these waffles and became very ill. She only had the waffles with butter. She was diagnosed at the age of 3 and is now 19 years old so we are very familiar with her reactions when she eats something containing gluten. Please do not label gluten free if they are NOT gluten free.

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    My daughter has celiac. She ate these waffles and became very ill. She only had the waffles with butter. She was diagnosed at the age of 3 and is now 19 years old so we are very familiar with her reactions when she eats something containing gluten. Please do not label gluten free if they are NOT gluten free.

    If you purchased their "gluten-free" waffles it is highly doubtful that they contained any gluten.

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    Here is the response I got from Kellog regarding my daughter getting sick every time she ate these, where they flat out state they can not guarantee their oats are free from gluten contamination...if you cant guarantee it then its NOT gluten-free!

    We will not trust any Kellog gluten-free products now...

     

    Dee,

    We are so glad you took the time to connect with us. Your interest in Kellogg's® Eggo® Gluten Free waffles - Original is appreciated and we are happy to share more information about Gluten with you.

     

    Oats are considered a gluten-free food, but our oats may contain gluten as a result of cross-contamination with other gluten-containing grains during processing. All of our Gluten Free products and manufacturing facilities that produce Gluten Free products undergo a comprehensive assessment and qualification to ensure compliance to regulations regarding labeling gluten free foods. Products tested gluten-free must contain less than 20 parts per million of gluten.

     

    I am so sorry to hear about your daughter becoming ill after comsuming these. I hope you are able to find another one of our deliciouse products for her. The ingredient list on each package will always show if the product contains Oats or Oat flour. Below are some of the options we have available, however as ingredients can change, please be sure to always read the nutrtion label.

     

    • Kellogg's® Rice Krispies® Gluten Free cereal made with whole grain brown rice<

    • Kellogg's® Fruit Flavored Snacks<

    • Kellogg's® Special K® Breakfast Shakes<

     

     

    Thank you again. We hope this information answers your question completely. If there is anything else we can help you with, please contact us again by calling 1-800-962-1413. You can also visit us online at www.kelloggs.com to learn more about our foods and determine which ones would work best for you.

     

    If you have additional comments or a photo to send to us, click here.

    Please do not use your “reply†button to respond to this e-mail. Replies to this message are routed to an unmonitored mailbox.

     

    Sincerely,

     

    Jamie B.

    Consumer Specialist

    Consumer Affairs

     

    028347246A

     

    Dee wrote:

    Is the oat flour that is in your gluten free waffles made from uncontaminated oats? My Celiac daughter was so excited to try these..unfortunately EVERY time she eats them she gets sick.. She usually avoids oats, however we decided to try the product since it was labeled gluten free,,we assumed the oat flour was made from safe oats..I'm tending to think it was not...

    Glad to hear straight from the horse's mouth. I just popped some in the oven, now I'm scared to eat them. I really don't want a hypoglycemic attack again. At least Glutino's is safe and their waffles taste just as great as I remember regular Eggo's tasting. Thought I'd try something slightly newer for a change. So much for stepping out of the safety net of familiarity.

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    If the product is labeled "gluten-free," it must contain less than 20ppm gluten, and meet the FDA standard for gluten-free. That would apply to any added oats.

    There are plenty of celiac sufferers who still react to less than 20ppm, the problem is they are unable to test for any smaller trace than that. Oats CAN be certified as gluten free though if the equipment is all new and the field where it's planted has laid fallow for 4 years and has been thoroughly inspected in that time. They cannot be used as a rotation crop in order to be certified gluten free.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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