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    Danna Korn

    Kids with Celiac Disease: A Family Guide to Raising Happy, Healthy Gluten-Free Children by Danna Korn

    Danna Korn
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.


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    A must-read survival guide for parents, friends, teachers, and caretakers.



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    Kids with Celiac Disease is a practical survival guide for families of children and teenagers with this lifelong digestive disorder. While it sounds as though it is only applicable to children with the condition, Kids with Celiac Disease is loaded with valuable information for people of any age - as well as for people on the gluten-free diet for reasons other than celiac disease. Written by the mother of a celiac child diagnosed in 1991, Kids with Celiac Disease is a compilation of 10 years of experience and research. Danna founded R.O.C.K. (Raising Our Celiac Kids) in 1991, and incorporated much of what she has learned from other parents into this book.

    Kids with Celiac Disease includes:

    • Practical suggestions for dealing with school, sitters, birthdays, holidays and other unique challenges
    • Menu and snack ideas
    • Emotional and psychological implications
    • How to talk with friends and family
    • Eating out at restaurants
    • Travel tips
    • Up-to-date scientific, medical and nutritional information
    • A resource guide listing contact information for hundreds of resources that are valuable to anyone on a gluten-free diet.

    Click here to order!

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  • About Me

    Danna Korn is the author of “Living Gluten- Free for Dummies,” “Gluten-Free Cooking for Dummies,” “Wheat-Free, Worry-Free: The Art of Happy, Healthy, Gluten-Free Living,” and “Kids with Celiac Disease: A Family Guide to Raising Happy, Healthy Gluten-Free Children.” She is respected as one of the leading authorities on the gluten-free diet and the medical conditions that benefit from it.


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