Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):


  • Join Our Community!

    Ask us a question in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Celiac.com Sponsor: Review

    Konjac Angel Hair Zero Calorie Pasta & Glucomannan Powder

    Celiac.com Sponsor: Review
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      It is known as “moyu” or “juruo” in China, and “konnyaku” or “shirataki noodles” in Japan.


    Konjac Angel Hair Pasta
    Caption: Konjac Angel Hair Pasta

    Celiac.com 03/30/2018 - As most people know already, “al dente” is an Italian term that describes how pasta should be prepared—not too hard, and not too soft. Konjac Angel Hair Zero Calorie Pasta by Konjac Foods comes ready-to-eat in 8.8 ounce packages that are filled with water, so the noodles are kept wet and ready-to-eat within the package, and despite this, the Konjac noodles are still perfectly al dente—firm but not soft. 

    Remarkably these noodles are marketed as “0 Calories,” and are free of sugar, fat, soy, and gluten. Their only ingredients are konjac glucomannan fiber, calcium hydroxide, and purified water. For those who don't know,  konjac glucomannan (KGM) is “a water-soluable dietary fiber derived from the root of the konjac plant.” It is known as “moyu” or “juruo” in China, and “konnyaku” or “shirataki noodles” in Japan.



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):






    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12-m):




    Besides being a great noodle choice for those on a gluten-free diet, Konjac noodles are also ideal for people on weight-loss or diabetic diets, as they are high in fiber and contain zero calories. Amazingly, the shelf life of these individual serving-sized packages is one full year at room temperature, so you can feel free to stock up on them.

    Konjac Foods also makes “Konjac Gucomannan Powder” in 500g packages. One teaspoon of the konjac powder can be added to 8 ounces of your favorite drink, including in smoothies. The dietary fiber in konjac flour is also water soluble, and according to the maker it has: “a greater potential to reduce postprandial blood glucose, insulin, and serum lipid levels than insoluble fiber.” 

    I tried both products, and found that the noodles were an excellent substitute for rice noodles in my homemade ramen. I also tried the noodles as a spaghetti replacement, and although they had a different texture than I'm used to, I really enjoyed it. The powder can be added as a fiber supplement to foods, drinks, and shakes, and I tried it in a smoothie. 

    Anyone who is dieting to lose weight, on a gluten-free or diabetic diet, or just looking for a more healthy noodle substitute (that won't spike your blood sugar) will appreciate these Konjac Foods products.  

    For more info visit their site.

    Edited by Scott Adams

    0

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There are no comments to display.



    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    This article is a paid advertising product review for this Web site. For more information about our advertising programs, including how you can see your ad on this site, please visit our advertising page.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17-m):




  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    As a kid, shrimp was one of my perpetual favorite foods. If something had shrimp in it, I'd probably eat try it. Shrimp is the reason I first tried gumbo, teriyaki, scampi, fried rice and coconut curry.
    I think that the vast majority of my exposure to international cuisine came out of my love for the lowly, bottom-dwelling, water bug that is the shrimp. I still one them to this day. This recipe grabs them hot off the grill and tosses them into a pile of rice noodles in a delicious Southeast-Asian inspired sauce. This is a great way to dip your culinary toes in Asian waters without breaking the bank or freaking out the taste buds of more timid eaters...

    Dr. Frank Jackson
    Celiac.com 12/17/2013 - One of the biggest hurdles for those who have celiac disease is finding a way to get enough fiber in their diets. Removing wheat from the equation also eliminates a huge amount of roughage. Wheat provides the fiber in many breads, pastas, crackers and other staples of the American diet. Replacing that fiber is crucial, since the added bulk moves the food through your digestive system and keeps you regular.
    You should be aiming to consume between 25 and 35 grams of fiber per day. Here are a few ways to ensure you’re getting enough fiber in your diet, whether you’ve been living with celiac disease your entire life or just for...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/03/2015 - You can make this with rice noodles or pure buckwheat soba noodles. The key is to cook the noodles only until they're halfway done, and then remove them from the hot water. They should be pliable, but still firm in the center. Pan-frying will finishes the cooking process. Add chicken, or shrimp, and you have the makings of a great meal.
    Ingredients:
    6-8 ounces of boneless chicken chunks, or cleaned, shelled and deveined shrimp 6 ounces gluten-free buckwheat soba, or rice noodles 2 large eggs, beaten 3 tablespoons soy sauce, more to taste 1 tablespoon grated fresh ginger 2 teaspoons rice wine or rice vinegar 1 teaspoon...