Jump to content
  • Sign Up
  • Join Our Community!

    Get help in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Larazotide Acetate in Patients With Celiac Disease Undergoing a Gluten Challenge

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 02/04/2013 - Ever wonder what happens to all those celiac disease patients who volunteer to do a gluten-challenge in the name of science? Well, the short answer is that they likely suffer, and may incur gut damage, at least in the short term.

    Photo: CC--CeresBA team of researchers looking for ways to reduce or eliminate that problem recently conducted a study using larazotide acetate, a first-in-class oral peptide that prevents tight junction opening, and may reduce gluten uptake and associated problems.

    The research team included C. P. Kelly, P. H. R. Green, J. A. Murray, A. DiMarino, A. Colatrella, D. A. Leffler, T. Alexander, R. Arsenescu, F. Leon, J. G. Jiang, L. A. Arterburner, B. M. Paterson, R. N. and Fedorak. They are affiliated with the Celiac Center of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center at Harvard Medical School in Boston, the Celiac Disease Center at Columbia University in New York, NY, the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN, Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia, PA, the Pittsburgh Gastroenterology Associates in Pittsburgh, PA, with Gastrointestinal Specialists of Troy, MI, the Department of Internal Medicine at the University of Kentucky, in Lexington, KY, with Alba Therapeutics Corporation in Baltimore, MD, and with the Division of Gastroenterology at the University of Alberta in Edmonton, AB.

    The team wanted to find out how well larazotide acetate worked and how well it was tolerated by celiac disease patients undergoing a gluten challenge.

    To do this, the team conducted an exploratory, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study that included 184 patients who maintained a gluten-free diet before and during the study.

    After a gluten-free diet run-in, the team randomly divided patients into groups and gave them either larazotide acetate in doses of 1, 4, or 8 mg three times daily, or a placebo. Both groups also received 2.7 grams of gluten daily for six weeks.

    The team then assessed ratios of lactulose-to-mannitol (LAMA), an experimental biomarker of intestinal permeability, and measured clinical symptoms by Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS) and anti-transglutaminase antibody levels.

    They found no significant differences in LAMA ratios between larazotide acetate and placebo groups. Larazotide acetate 1-mg limited gluten-induced symptoms measured by GSRS (P = 0.002 vs. placebo).

    They did find that the average ratio of anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA levels was 19.0 over baseline in the placebo group compared with 5.78 (P = 0.010) in the 1mg larazotide acetate group, 3.88 (P = 0.005) in the 4mg larazotide acetate group, and 7.72 (P = 0.025) in the 8mg larazotide acetate group.

    Both the larazotide acetate and placebo groups showed similar rates of "adverse events."

    Overall, the team found that larazotide acetate reduced gluten-induced immune reactivity and symptoms in celiac disease patients undergoing gluten challenge and was generally well tolerated.

    However, the team found no significant difference in LAMA ratios between the larazotide acetate and placebo groups.

    Even though they did not find anything revolutionary, the results and design of their study will likely be helpful in shaping future gluten-challenge studies in patients with celiac disease.

    Source: 


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    I am glad someone has written something about this study. Many had high hopes for this. It was too good to be true. I have been following Dr. Fasano's papers and the last one in 2011 where he says that he believe that all autoimmunity is not auto perpetuating once you can remove the environmental triggers, stuff we swallow etc., then it can be stopped. I would suggest that Ketogenic diet and testing back paleo type carbs is the best we got unless you want to risk autoimmune suppressing drug alternatives which is a really really bad idea.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I was diagnosed in 2006 and had been told at that time that this would likely be an option in a few years. Here we are 7 years later and we're still hearing "in a few years". So much for fast track status!!!

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

  • Forum Discussions

    Thanks.  I think these were not the freshest tortillas.  Layering instead of rolling tastes the same but isn’t as “ fun” as rolled.  
    It is ugly truth that taking vitamins/minerals with RDA and AI can leads to major side effect. Biotin: it comes in food and supplement. It is highly suggested not to take it doses more than 30 µg. Its biggest sources is almond,cauliflower ...
    This is great advice, my mother and grand mother (both Hispanic) always would get the freshest ones and dip in the sauce before rolling. When reheating it varied with tortillas on freshness (and how much of a hurry) but they either heated...
×
×
  • Create New...