Jump to content
  • Sign Up
Celiac.com Sponsor:


Celiac.com Sponsor:


  • Join Our Community!

    Get help in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Jefferson Adams

    Late Not Early-Introduction of Gluten to Infants Seems to Increase Celiac Risk

    Jefferson Adams


    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 11/23/2015 - A new study looks at the impacts of introducing gluten to infants and the development of celiac disease. A research team recently set out to assess the evidence regarding the effect of time of gluten introduction and breastfeeding on the risk of developing celiac disease.

    Photo: CC--Sander Van der WelThe research team included MI Pinto-Sánchez, EF Verdu, E Liu, P Bercik, PH Green, JA Murray, S Guandalini, and P Moayyedi. Their team conducted a comprehensive review of studies from the following electronic databases: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL); MEDLINE (Ovid); EMBASE (Ovid); and System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe (SIGLE). Two independent authors collected the data.



    Celiac.com Sponsor:




    Their analysis included randomized controlled trials and observational studies that assessed proper timing for introducing gluten to the infant diet, appropriate quantity of gluten consumption at weaning, and the effect of breastfeeding on celiac disease risk.

    Out of a total of 1982 studies they identified, 15 matched their criteria for data extraction. The team performed a meta-analysis on 2 randomized controlled trials, 10 cohort studies, and 1 case-control study. That analysis showed a 25% increase in celiac disease risk with gluten-introduction after 6 months, compared to the recommended 4 to 6 months (risk ratio [RR], 1.25; 95% CI, 1.08-1.45).

    There was no difference between breastfeeding vs no breastfeeding on celiac disease risk (OR, 0.55; 95% CI, 0.28-1.10), with substantial heterogeneity (I2 = 92%) among studies. There is currently no evidence to support that early introduction of gluten to the infant diet increases the risk of celiac disease.

    However, introduction of gluten after six months of age might promote an increased risk of celiac disease.

    More studies are needed that control for potential confounders and that evaluate environmental factors in low-risk families.

    Source:


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    This is similar to the results of the LEAP food allergy study which addressed introduction of peanuts and egg and found that toddlers who were introduced later to these foods had a greater chance of developing food allergies.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    The tough thing here is that an infant can't communicate specifics about how they feel, where an older child can. I know friends who had their infant tested for the "celiac genes" knowing it runs in their family. When they found their child has the genes, they decided not to introduce gluten into the child's diet until the child could use words to describe how he was feeling, This has seemed to work for them, rather than taking a risk that their child would get ill at a developmentally critical point as an infant, had they introduced gluten right away. So far the child is doing well since gluten was gradually introduced into his diet building up to moderate, but not heavy rates, since no good can come of not practicing moderation. They have the child's blood tested at his annual checkup to look for any antibodies that would indicate the celiac gene has "turned on". And the child is old enough now to tell his parents if his tummy hurts after he eats certain things.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest gluten free grandma

    Posted

    I was diagnosed with Celiac just before my 5th and last child was conceived. My first five children, dermatitis herpatiformis or gluten intolerance. I nursed all my children and ate gluten with the first 4. With My last child, I was eating gluten free through the pregnancy and while nursing and we kept her gluten-free until she went to college and decided to eat gluten.  She has been tested since, at age 25 yrs. and tests negative to Celiac and seems to tolerate wheat fine.  I don't think the scientists know at all. and I agree, keep them off gluten until they can verbalize how they feel. 

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

  • Related Articles

    Roy Jamron
    Celiac.com 11/06/2008 - Previously, the possible link between gut bacteria and celiac disease has been discussed in "Do Vitamin D Deficiency, Gut Bacteria, and Gluten Combine in Infancy to Cause Celiac Disease?"[1] A 5-year European study, DIABIMMUNE, is currently underway focusing on some 7000 children, from birth, investigating the development of intestinal bacterial flora and...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/09/2011 - A team of researchers recently set out to assess the effects of milk-feeding behavior and the HLA-DQ genotype on intestinal colonization of Bacteroides species in infants with a risk of developing celiac disease.
    The research team included E. Sánchez, G. De Palma, A. Capilla, E. Nova, T. Pozo, G. Castillejo, V. Varea, A. Marcos, J. A. Garrote, I. Polanco,...

    Gryphon Myers
    Celiac.com 07/04/2012 - It is becoming increasingly clear that celiac disease (or some form of gluten sensitivity) affects many more people in the world than estimates from the past few decades suggested. In the 1950s, celiac disease was estimated as affecting 1 in 8000 individuals worldwide, while today that number has grown to 1 in 100. Seeking to explain why this sizable portion ...

  • Celiac.com Sponsor:

  • Forum Discussions

    I’m curious - in the US the flu vaccine is recommended every year for almost everybody.  Is that not the case in the UK?
    Started more resistance training and weight training, went to a high protein take of a keto diet. For protein powders I found issues with many and I have seen significant muscle increase changing to Beef Protein Isolate, Egg White, Collagen...
×
×
  • Create New...