Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):


  • You've found your Celiac Tribe! Join our like-minded, private community and share your story, get encouragement and connect with others.

    💬

    • Sign In
    • Sign Up
  • Tina Turbin

    Low Glycemic Paleo Diet (Part 2)

    Tina Turbin
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      Journal of Gluten Sensitivity Spring 2015 Issue - Originally published April 8, 2015


    Photo: CC--thebittenword.com
    Caption: Photo: CC--thebittenword.com

    Celiac.com 12/29/2015 - I discussed the possibility of a Low Glycemic Paleo Diet as an entertaining idea as a beneficial diet for celiac in the last issue, Winter 2015. In closing, I stated I would reveal more about this topic in the coming issue. So, let's dive in and open our eyes to some facts and even some revealing possibilities that may very well help improve our health and quality of life.

    As a celiac myself, (2 of my three kids have celiac disease and my grandfather died from undiagnosed celiac disease) I was more than happy to follow the gluten-free diet diligently once finally diagnosed after many years of distress, bone loss, declining health not to mention non-stop bone aches, bowel inconsistency and severe lack of muscle tone. I will spare you further details but there was no doubt a major beneficial change that occurred once I eliminated all gluten from sources of wheat, rye and barley and all its "relatives" or any possible cross contamination. Eventually I was thrilled to be able to eat baked good substitutes that did not hurt my belly, cause my joints and bones to ache and were absolutely delicious and healthy, as they were gluten-free!



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):






    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12-m):




    Soon after I became an active advocate (and for many years) I was thrilled to be able to speak broadly to help raise awareness about celiac disease and the NEED for the gluten-free diet. I was also soon working closely with many gluten-free companies (as a tester, consultant and promoter) becoming blind to the fact that the boxes that were arriving to my door by the truckload were all desserts, loaded with carbohydrates and sugars.

    At the time I wrote and spoke often (in interviews and on radio) about Type 2 diabetes and celiac disease but never put two and two together. If lifestyle and diet change can address Type 2 permanently, what were these diet changes that were so effective? Also, even more to the point, why was Type 2 diabetes so common as a diagnosis after being diagnosed with celiac disease and going on the gluten-free diet?

    Research suggests an association between Type 1 diabetes and celiac disease, but there does not appear to be a link between celiac disease and type 2 diabetes. Type 2 is not an autoimmune disorder and doesn't share genes with celiac disease. According to the Celiac Sprue Association, individuals can be genetically predisposed to Type 2 diabetes, but those genes don't increase the risk of celiac disease.

    Let's look at the immense increased ingestion of glucose, sugars and carbohydrates and fiber while one is on the gluten-free diet by indulging in baked goods, desserts and grains! Gluten-free foods and grains are typically made with rice starch (or brown rice starch), tapioca starch, cornstarch and potato starch. All of which have virtually no fiber. Hence straight into the blood stream spiking the blood sugar bite after bite and quickly.

    The latest attempt is many companies and cooks trying to improve nutrients by baking with higher fiber gluten-free grains with higher nutrient value. Such as teff, millet, buckwheat etc. These are all still VERY HIGH in carbohydrates and very little fiber to slow the glycemic entrance into the blood system, still resulting in spiking the blood sugar rapidly. I must mention that most people do not just eat 2-3 bites of millet or a ¼ cup of cooked buckwheat. This would be easier on the body, but it seldom occurs.

    Carbohydrates are a type of nutrient in foods and some feel we need this to survive physically and some MD's are saying we need far less than we ever thought. The three basic forms are sugars, starches and fiber. Different types of carbohydrates have properties that affect how quickly your body digests them and how quickly glucose enters your bloodstream. When we eat or drink anything with carbs, the body breaks down the sugars and starches into a type of sugar called glucose. Glucose is the main source of energy for cells in the body. Fiber passes through your body undigested. The unused glucose for energy is quickly taken out of the blood stream by the insulin and "stocked" away in the cells for future energy as fat. It is the body's amazing way of survival.

    To elaborate a bit more, the two main hormones from the pancreas help regulate glucose in the bloodstream. Insulin moves glucose from the blood into the cells. Glucagon helps release glucose stored in your liver when the blood sugar (blood glucose) level is low.

    I suggest to anyone to take a look at the nutritional value on all packages and foods and get familiar with the amount of carbohydrates you are ingesting through your meals, snack and drinks. Get familiar with the carbohydrate, sugar and fiber levels in the food you buy and have in your home. Getting educated is the first step to learning and then you can make changes to suit your health and body goals.

    A healthy paleo or gluten-free diet is a low glycemic one at the very least. A low glycemic diet can improve all manner of current health situations. By statistics and more than abundant research, it will deter diseases quiet commonly associated with a high glycemic diet.

    We will expand on this topic next time.

    At this point I would like to refer you to some highly respected professionals and allow you to do further research and come to your own conclusions. Please look further into DrPerlmutter.com, Mercola.com, WheatBellyBlog.com, BulletProofExec.com, ChrisKresser.com, MarksDailyApple.com.

    As always, wishing you the best in your life and health!

    0

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    Good article. My son has celiac but also has nut, soy, potato, wheat etc allergies. Paleo diets don't work as most call for almonds and various other nuts. Try telling a child he can't eat cookies - gluten free or not. I find it very difficult avoiding the flours you listed ... he wants his birthday cake and after school cookies.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Tina Turbin is a world-renowned Celiac advocate who researches, writes, and consults about the benefits of the gluten-free, paleo-ish, low carb and keto diets, and is a full time recipe developer and founder of PaleOmazing.com. Tina also founded and manages the popular website, GlutenFreeHelp.info, voted the #2 .info website in the world. Tina believes that celiacs need to be educated to be able to make informed decisions and that Paleo needs to be tailored to the individual’s physiology to obtain desired results. You can reach her at: INFO@PaleOmazing.com.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17-m):




  • Related Articles

    Dr. Rodney Ford M.D.
    Celiac.com 10/22/2008 - This article appeared in the Autumn 2007 edition of Celiac.com's Scott-Free Newsletter.
    The Gluten Syndrome refers to the cluster ofsymptoms that you experience if you react to gluten.  Gluten can affectyour gut, your skin, and your brain.  It applies to any reaction thatis caused by gluten.  It includes celiac disease, along with the myriadsymptoms that can be experienced throughout your gastro-intestinaltract in response to gluten.  It also includes many other symptoms thatdo not stem from your gut.  These include brain and behavior disorders,irritability and tiredness, skin problems, muscular aches and pains andjoint prob...

    Wendy Cohan, RN
    Celiac.com 04/05/2019 (Originally published on 10/19/2009) - Gluten intolerance caused by celiac disease, or non-celiac gluten sensitivity, may affect virtually any part of the body. A culprit in multiple health disorders, gluten intolerance is a major driver of health care delivery and associated costs.  While this may seem to be an outrageous claim, a review of the many ways in which gluten intolerance can adversely affect the body will illustrate this point. So, let’s work our way down from head to toe.
    Celiac Disease Can Cause Hair Loss
    Normal, healthy hair is usually glossy and thick.  An autoimmune disorder known as alopecia areata...

    Rivkah Roth D.O., D.N.M.
    Celiac.com 08/28/2012 - What's In A Name and When Does Celiac Predisposition Become A Disease?
    No doubt that global awareness about celiac disease and its possible involvement in a myriad of other (mostly autoimmune response related) conditions is growing. Growing, unfortunately, is confusion about terminologies and medical implications.


    The “Common” Understanding
    "Celiac disease" has become a generic blanket term not unlike how "Kleenex" today signifies no more than a box of tissue paper of any brand. So, in the public mind, "celiac disease" today stands for everything connected to a reaction to gluten.[1]
    Such an approach is ...

    Maria Larkin, M.Ed, RDN/LD
    Celiac.com 02/16/2016 - About two years ago, as a result of two comprehensive review articles written by research scientists, Anthony Samsel and Stephanie Seneff, the term "glyphosates" made media headlines.
    Based on more than 200 citations, their reviews concluded that long term exposure to glyphosates via ingestion (in food and water) and/or inhalation seems to parallel the incidence and clinical features of celiac disease and may contribute to a number of diseases including autism, cancer, Parkinson's Disease, Alzheimer's Disease, infertility, depression, inflammatory bowel disease, Multiple Sclerosis, cancer, allergies, eosinophilic esophagitis...

    Amie  Valpone
    Celiac.com 04/05/2016 - These fresh-tasting burgers make an easy weeknight meal. No buns here; you can serve these wrapped in romaine or Bibb lettuce leaves and eat them with your hands. Make sure your millet isn't too dry or the burgers won't stick together!
    Serves 6
    Ingredients:
    1 cup millet ½ teaspoon sea salt, plus a pinch for cooking millet 1 tablespoon ground flax seeds 3 tablespoons water 1 large carrot, peeled and grated 4 scallions, thinly sliced 1 handful fresh basil leaves, finely chopped 2 tablespoons freshly squeezed lemon juice 2 ½ teaspoons freshly grated lemon zest ½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 3 tablespoons co...

    Betty Wedman-St Louis, PhD, RD
    Celiac.com 04/12/2016 - Vitamin B12 is a group of cobalt containing compounds described by Alan R. Gaby, M.D. in Nutritional Medicine called cobalamins. Methylcobalamin is the coenzyme form of B12 that is critical for human health. Hydroxocobalamin is a more stable form of B12 but it first needs to be converted to an active form before use in metabolism.
    Vitamin B12 is important in DNA synthesis, red blood cell formation, homocysteine metabolism and the production of S-adenosylmethionine (SAMe). Adequate B12 is essential for proper neurological and immune function.
    The importance of Vitamin B12 in health and anemia management began during the Depression...

    Tina Turbin
    Celiac.com 05/17/2016 - The paleolithic diet, or paleo diet which happens to be gluten-free, has been growing increasingly popular among athletes and health advocates, but it has a history dating back to the mid-1970's as a means of preventing diseases and health conditions such as autoimmune diseases and cancer, when investigations were made of the eating patterns of our hunter-gatherer ancestors.
    The paleo gluten-free diet, the "biologically appropriate" diet, is named for the Paleolithic era, which extended 2.5 million years ending in 10,000 B.C. with the advent of agriculture and animal husbandry. It's comprised of the foods our human ancestors...

    Amie  Valpone
    Celiac.com 05/31/2016 - Dipping your spoon into this bell pepper–sweet potato combo is like dipping into a bowl of sunshine. It's stunning—and the perfect antidote to a gloomy winter's day. This soup also freezes well, so if you're not serving a crowd, store the leftovers for a later date (or make a double batch). I like to enjoy this soup accompanied by my Massaged Kale Salad with Spicy Hazelnuts
    Serves 6 to 8
    Ingredients:
    ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil ½ small onion, diced 2 medium carrots, peeled and diced 1 celery stalk, diced Sea salt and freshly ground black pepper, to taste 8 yellow, red and/or orange bell peppers, chopped 1 larg...

    Monique Attinger
    Celiac.com 06/07/2016 - The world of nutrition is currently obsessed with "super foods". Super foods are loosely defined as foods that are extremely high in nutrients – particularly antioxidants and vitamins – and which everyone is heartily advised to add to their diet.
    The problem with this approach is that, while focused firmly on nutrients, we are ignoring anti-nutrients! According to Wikipedia, an anti-nutrient is a compound in food that interferes with your absorption of other nutrients from a food. Most foods have varying amounts of anti-nutrients, toxins and other problematic compounds. A truly healthy diet will include weighing the good aga...

    Tina Turbin
    Celiac.com 06/07/2016 - Where are all my Mexican food lovers? This one is especially for you. These Mexican stuffed zucchini boats are a perfect gluten-free party dish. You can cut them up into smaller pieces and serve them as a tray snack that is nutritious and protein packed. I don't know about you but I love when I go to a party and there are plates of healthy items to snack on. I never feel good filling up on just potato chips and veggie sticks. Junk food makes you feel pretty junky.
    I really enjoy hosting get togethers at my house. Since I am a mom of three "kids" and am a grandmother as well, I tend to have a full house and like to make healthy...

    Tina Turbin
    Celiac.com 06/23/2016 - This is a very versatile gluten-free recipe. This paleo and gluten-free brownie pie crust can be made into a crust or simply eaten as gluten-free cookies. It is also totally OK to consume it raw since it is made out of all vegan ingredients. Based on the feedback I've received, it tastes delicious when prepared raw.
    This crust/cookie recipe is a wonderful base to build upon. I create a lot of raw cheesecakes with the crust and any leftovers are made into little cookies for later. The chocolate flavor in this is quite light so it won't overpower the other flavors you may want to work in with it.
    The only piece of...

    Tina Turbin
    Celiac.com 07/05/2016 - This is hands down one of the easiest and most loved weekend recipes I whip up. Healthy, protein packed, sugar-free, gluten-free, paleo and satisfying. When I have the entire family over they always request this easy sausage and peppers recipe. It works for brunch, lunch or even dinner. I must warn you though, this will go fast. Make plenty of extra so you have leftovers as this gluten-free recipe is delicious heated back up.
    If I have everyone over for brunch I will usually make a homemade frittata to go with this or some sweet potato breakfast potatoes. Even my two Maltese pups go crazy over the aroma that emanates from my...

    Jim Swayze, ASQ CSQE
    Celiac.com 09/08/2017 - For for the overwhelming majority of our time here on this planet we've all followed a paleo, or hunter-gatherer, diet. This is not a way of eating invented by the latest Hollywood guru – though truth be told there are now plenty of stars who eat this way. It's common sense, really, if you're able to unlearn a good portion of the dietary wisdom we've been force-fed over the last generation or two.
    Paleo means little more than, in the words of Ray Audette, what you could find to eat if you were "naked with a sharp stick.” And the foods you'd find would have to be, at least in theory (though usually not in practice), edible raw...