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  • Destiny Stone
    Destiny Stone

    Many Naturally Gluten-Free Foods May be Contaminated

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 07/21/2010 - Naturally gluten-free foods have long held the assumption that they are supposed to be gluten-free. However, a new study has found that many naturally occurring gluten-free foods are in fact not gluten-free.

    Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye and barley, and people with gluten sensitivities know to avoid those grains. However,  a new study lead by celiac disease nutrition consultant, Tricia Thompson, proves that many naturally gluten-free grains, seeds and flours found in your local supermarket are definitely not gluten-free.

    Tricia and her team of researchers evaluated 22 naturally gluten-free seeds, flours and grains that were not labeled as being “gluten-free”. They tested the products using the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) standards for acceptable gluten levels of 20 parts contaminant per million parts product. Trish and her researchers found that 7 of the 22 products tested, would not pass the FDA standards, including millet grain and flour, buckwheat flour, and sorghum flour.

    Currently the FDA does not mandate that companies labeling their products as “gluten-free” actually test for acceptable gluten levels in their products. Although, under the new proposed FDA gluten-free regulations, the FDA would be able to inspect foods labeled “gluten-free” for validity of the gluten-free claim.

    Unfortunately the scope of this study is not vast enough to determine exactly which products to watch out for, but Tricia and her  colleagues agree that more research is needed in this area. Meanwhile Tricia recommends that people with celiac disease and gluten sensitivities only purchase grains, flours and seeds labeled as “gluten-free”, as these products are more likely to be tested for acceptable FDA levels of gluten.

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    Thank you for writing about this issue. I was also stunned to see on a package of frozen vegetables the "same equipment used for wheat products". I am extremely sensitive and after 13 years since diagnosis I am still finding foods I wouldn't expect to be cross contaminated, are.

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    The issue here is that there are facilities that do both gluten and gluten free manufacturing, unless there is a lot of handling awareness and care, there is a possibility of gluten contamination. Some people have very low tolerance to gluten, others can tolerate a 20-30ppm well, and those products that have 20-30ppm (depending on the market) are considered gluten free.

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    This is great information... no wonder why I keep getting sick over foods from my local market that say "Naturally gluten free" So I am definitely going to stay away from those products that is for sure!

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    This information has explained why I get sick every time I eat something from my supermarket that says "Naturally gluten free"! Thanks for sharing...I will definitely not be buying anymore foods that say "Naturally Gluten Free"!

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    Well...I think “naturally gluten free”  has to be taken in context. If the whole factory is only making naturally gluten free items then it should be ok. Same as you can feel “safe” in a dedicated gluten free bakery whereas don’t even try to go into a regular bakery or pizza parlor where there’s gluten in the air and on all the counters!! 

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  • About Me

    I diagnosed myself for gluten intolerance after a lifetime of bizarre, seemingly unrelated afflictions. If my doctors had their way, I would have already undergone neck surgery, still be on 3 different inhalers for asthma, be vomiting daily and having chronic panic attacks. However, since eliminating gluten from my diet in May 2009, I no longer suffer from any of those things. Even with the proof in the pudding (or gluten) my doctors now want me to ingest gluten to test for celiac-no can do.

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