Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


  • Join Our Community!

    Ask us a question in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Record is Archived

    This article is now archived and is closed to further replies.

    Jules Shepard

    Maple-Oat Scones (Gluten-Free)

    Jules Shepard
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    I know there has been a lot of talk lately about whether Starbucks willbegin adding gluten-free offerings to their now-forbidden gluten-filledglass cases. Time will tell if they do so, if they do it safely (thosekinds of cases are a huge source of cross-contamination), and if theydo it tastily. But I'm not going to sit idly by and wait for Starbucksto see the light. I invented my own Starbucks-like maple scone, and Idare say it's better than any they may devise!

    I made thisrecipe dairy-free, but you could use dairy yogurt and regular milkinstead. I have also provided alternatives for those of you watchingyour sugar intake, so everyone may partake.



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):




    Enjoy!

    Gluten-Free Maple-Oat Scones

    Ingredients:
    1¼ cup certified gluten-free rolled oats (You may substitute an equalportion of Jules' Gluten Free All Purpose Flour in lieu of these oatsif you avoid oats in your diet)
    2 cups Jules' Gluten Free All Purpose Flour* (+ additional to flour the rolling surface)
    ¼ cup granulated cane sugar (or Splenda)
    ½ teaspoon baking soda
    2 teaspoons gluten-free baking powder
    ¼ cup Earth Balance Shortening or Buttery Sticks
    1 cup vanilla (soy or dairy) yogurt
    2 large eggs
    2 Tablespoons pure maple syrup (or dark agave nectar)

    (*Note- This recipe calls for Jules Gluten Free All Purpose Flour which maybe made at home according to directions found in my books, NearlyNormal Cooking for Gluten-Free Eating and The First Year: CeliacDisease and Living Gluten-Free, as well as in various media links on mywebsite.)

    Glaze Ingredients (optional):
    1 ½ cups confectioner's sugar
    2 Tablespoons+ vanilla (soy or dairy) milk
    2 Tablespoons pure maple syrup (or dark agave nectar)

    Directions:
    Preheat the oven to 400 F static or 375 F convection.

    MapleScone_gluten-free.jpgPourthe oats into a blender or food processor and blend into a fine flour.(Or use equal amount Jules Gluten Free All Purpose Flour)

    In alarge bowl whisk together the dry ingredients: oat flour, Jules GlutenFree All Purpose Flour, sugar, baking soda and baking powder. Cut inthe shortening using a pastry cutter, two knives or an electric mixer.

    Ina small bowl, stir the eggs together with a fork to mix. Pour eggs intothe mixed dry ingredients, then add the yogurt and maple syrup. Stirwell to combine.

    Turn the dough onto a clean counter or pastrymat liberally dusted with my Jules Gluten Free All Purpose Flour. Coatyour hands with the flour as well, then scoop the dough in a ball ontothe mat.

    Pat the dough out into a flat disc, approximately 1inch thick. Using a butter knife, cut the dough into three sections,then cut each section into smaller triangles. You should wind up withapproximately 12 triangle-shaped scones. Make sure there is not toomuch extra flour on the tops of the scones before baking - brush offlightly, if necessary.

    Place each scone onto a parchment-linedcookie sheet and bake in the preheated oven for approximately 10minutes, or until they spring back when lightly touched. Do not overcook! Remove the entire baking sheet to a cooling rack.

    Aftercooling for at least 5 minutes, stir together the glaze ingredients,adding the milk only one tablespoon at a time until it reaches apourable, but not thin, glaze consistency. Slowly pour over the tops ofeach scone. Some of the glaze will pool around the scones onto theparchment paper, so leave the scones on the baking sheet for this glazestep unless you are serving immediately and want the glaze to pool onthe serving plates.

    0

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    I've made these twice, and the proportion of wet to dry ingredients creates a mix that is more like pancakes than scones - there is no way to pick the dough up, let alone shape it in to a ball. I'm giving it a 3, because I think this is a simple error and if the proportions are corrected (though I haven't figured that out - it seems that you have to add close to twice the amount of flour called for) it would be a must have!

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Join eNewsletter



    Guest
    This is now closed for further comments

  • About Me

    Atop each of Jules Shepard’s free weekly recipe newsletters is her mantra: “Perfecting Gluten-Free Baking, Together.” From her easy-to-read cookbook (“Nearly Normal Cooking for Gluten Free Eating”) to her highly rated reference for making the transition to living gluten free easier (“The First Year: Celiac Disease and Living Gluten Free”), Jules is tireless in the kitchen, at the keyboard and in person in helping people eating gluten free do it with ease, with style and with no compromises.
     
    In the kitchen, she creates recipes for beautiful, tasty gluten-free foods that most people could never tell are gluten free. As a writer, she produces a steady stream of baking tips, living advice, encouragement and insights through magazine articles, her web site (gfJules.com), newsletter, e-books and on sites like celiac.com and others. Jules also maintains a busy schedule of speaking at celiac and gluten-free gatherings, appearing on TV and radio shows, baking industry conventions, as well as teaching classes on the ease and freedom of baking at home.
     
    Her patent-pending all-purpose flour literally has changed lives for families who thought going gluten free meant going without. Thousands read her weekly newsletter, follow her on Twitter and interact with her on FaceBook.  


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17):




  • Related Articles

    Phyllis Morrow
    Celiac.com 11/17/2008 - One of the great pleasures of the holidays is having a wide assortment of goodies around to enjoy with family and friends. Don’t get left out of the fun just because you’re gluten-intolerant. Organize an old-fashioned cookie exchange with a gluten-free twist. Here’s how to do it...
     Pick a date and invite people to participate:

     The easy route: just get your family and friends together for the event at your house. Whether or not they are gluten-intolerant, these recipes will make everyone happy. They really won’t miss the gluten. Or, if you belong to a celiac support group, this is a natural activity to suggest.  Altern...

    Jules Shepard
    Celiac.com 01/18/2009 - This recipe was born of my new year's desire to experiment with new grains and flavors to achieve more nutritious results in my baking.
    I was speaking to a support group last Friday night and one of the audience questions was about this very topic: the concern that gluten-free baking often produces less healthy results. I completely agree.
    Now, much of my gluten-free baking and recipes are already on the low-sugar and low-fat end of the spectrum - something I feel very strongly about in my own diet. Take that statement with a grain of Southern sugar though, because this Southern girl knows that sweets still have their place...

    Destiny Stone
    Celiac.com 06/11/2010 - Most American parades and festivals revolve around good old fashioned American food. Most people will be enjoying  corn-dogs, french fries, waffle-cone sundaes and funnel cakes. Fourth of July celebrations are not likely to be very different from other festivals, and as a gluten-free person, it is important to be prepared for some good old fashioned American junk food-gluten-free.
    Converting your favorite junk foods to gluten-free may take a bit of creativity, but don't despair, it is possible. There are places offering gluten-free junk food options, but making your own gluten-free junk food is fun and takes the worry out of ...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/11/2011 - St. Patrick's Day is once again upon us, which means it's a good time to prepare for a successful gluten-free celebration of the wearing of the green.
    One good thing for people on a gluten-free diet is that most traditional corned beef and cabbage recipes are gluten free. So, of course, are carrots and potatoes.
    If you plan of making corned beef, you should know that most commercial corned beef is gluten free. Some brands that are specifically labeled 'gluten free,' or which the makers' websites claim to be gluten-free, include:

    Brookfield Farms Colorado Premium - all corned beef products Cook's Freirich - all...