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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Meghan Markle Says Ditching Gluten Made Her Skin Glow

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      Soon-to-be member of the British royal family has just jumped into our gluten-free celebrity of the month pool. Here's the story about how ditching gluten made her skin healthier and more radiant.


    Caption: Soon to be member of the British royal family, Meghan Markle, says ditching gluten made her skin healthier and more radiant. Photo: CC--Genevieve

    Celiac.com 01/12/2018 - As an American, I almost never get excited about British royalty, or soon-to-be royalty. Chatter about William and Kate? Yawn. Charles and Camilla? Double yawn. Royal babies? Pshaw. I'd rather watch paint dry.

    However, one soon-to-be royal has just jumped into our gluten-free celebrity of the month pool, and so a brief story can't be helped.

    Much of the celebrity-gawking world might be unabashedly obsessed with Meghan Markle right now, and that makes her claims about ditching gluten newsworthy. In a recent interview with Delish, the 36-year-old Markel said that cutting gluten from her diet resulted in major improvements in her skin and energy levels.

    Now, there are health experts who claim that at least cutting back on gluten consumption can improve gut health, which plays a role in skin health. And there's plenty of evidence to show that, for people who are sensitive to gluten, eliminating gluten from the diet can reduce gut inflammation and improve symptoms that may affect skin and other organs.

    However, for people without celiac disease, there's no good research to support claims of any direct link between cutting gluten and improvements in gut and skin health.

    So, should you ditch gluten to get better skin? If you have genuine gluten sensitivity, then yes, by all means, ditching gluten will likely be helpful. If you don't have a gluten sensitivity, then ditching gluten is unlikely to have any major benefits, at least, that's what the science says.


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    I hate this kind of media stuff. Making the gluten-free diet a glamorous thing done by glamorous people just makes it harder for those of us with celiac disease to be taken seriously, which makes the social piece of a serious disease that requires a restricted diet even more difficult. Ugh. I agree with dappy: "... we used to call that 'makeup'."

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    Always worth doing your own experiments. The more celebs take to gluten-free the more caterers and food suppliers will do for us celiacs. I am in the UK by the way and think this marriage may do our crusty system a lot of good!

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    I hate this kind of media stuff. Making the gluten-free diet a glamorous thing done by glamorous people just makes it harder for those of us with celiac disease to be taken seriously, which makes the social piece of a serious disease that requires a restricted diet even more difficult. Ugh. I agree with dappy: "... we used to call that 'makeup'."

    I understand and sympathize. However, for every person who hates "this kind of media stuff," there are many more who like it. In fairness, Ms. Markel is a major news figure, and consequently her statements on many things, including gluten (however accurate or inaccurate) will be reported as news. In doing so, we have also tried to point out the lack of scientific foundation behind Ms. Markel's statements. I hope that helps.

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    Always worth doing your own experiments. The more celebs take to gluten-free the more caterers and food suppliers will do for us celiacs. I am in the UK by the way and think this marriage may do our crusty system a lot of good!

    I agree with you. I generally regard gluten-free celebrities and news about them as mainly good for raising celiac and/or gluten-free awareness. There's no major downside that I can see.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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