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  • Jefferson Adams

    Michelin-Starred French Chef Shoots for the Gluten-Free Moon

    Jefferson Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 04/08/2016 - An all gluten-free menu by a celebrated French chef? At half price? Oui! Michelin-starred French chef is going all-in on gluten-free food by banishing gluten from her entire menu, and cutting prices in half to start it all off.

    Photo: CC--Dennis33053The announcement, by Chef Reine Sammut, makes L'Auberge de la Feniere in Provence the first restaurant in France to have both a Michelin star and a gluten-free menu.



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    The classic restaurant built in a stone barn and surrounded by vineyards has indeed adopted a gluten-free menu, says Sammut, who has had her Michelin star since 1995.

    She was inspired to make the change by her daughter, Nadia, who is a chemist and suffers from celiac disease. Sammut was eager to make the change to a gluten-free menu so that "everyone could eat at the same table."

    "The basic ingredients needed are not easy to find, but Nadia tracked them down," said Sammut. "I only had to test them."

    L'Auberge de la Feniere is offering its gluten-free menu, which even has gluten-free puff pastry, at half the usual price to encourage people to try the restaurant's new, gluten-free cuisine. She had me at "gluten-free puff pastry."

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    "Sammut was eager to make the change to a gluten-free menu so that "everyone could eat at the same table."

     

    What a novel idea, and hopefully more will follow her lead.

     

    Eating fresh, whole food meals is not difficult and I am 99% certain that those who can eat gluten wouldn't even miss it while enjoying a quality meal.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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