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  • Sheila Hughes

    Millet is an Untapped Gluten-Free Resource

    Sheila Hughes
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Photo: CC--tonrulkins
    Caption: Photo: CC--tonrulkins

    Celiac.com 05/14/2013 - Despite the fact that millet is more nutritious than wheat, as well as other gluten-free grains, modern science lacks the processing technologies to manufacture it on a large scale. Millet is an age-old grain, however we have yet to harness its full potential due to this drawback.

    Photo: CC--tonrulkinsThe preparation of millet includes fermentation, decortication, milling, and sieving. Most of millet being processed today is currently being down on a household level in rural areas, and due to this fact its availability is limited in urban areas. Another challenge with increasing millet production is making sure the nutritional properties are not depleted during the process.



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    Current health benefits of millet include high anti-oxidants which could mean a reduced risk of cancer. It is also used more and more in diabetic products because it is high in polyunsaturated fat.

    While there currently isn't a system to produce millet on a large scale, there is research being done in this area. Perhaps in the near future we will see this grain being produced on the scale needed to make it common place in gluten-free products.

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    I have celiac and had a horrible reaction to Millet. It may not be safe for all.

    I am celiac and also had a bad reaction. Many other celiac also report problems with it.

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    Millet is considered the 5th most cross reactive food for people with celiac disease. It may not adversely affect everyone, but I would strongly advise people to avoid it.

    Millet is 100% gluten-free, but every celiac may have additional intolerance issues that they need to figure out.

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    Millet has thyroid suppressing properties and should only be eaten in small amounts.

    Only people with thyroid disease have to watch out for goitrogenic foods. They will not effect a healthy thyroid.

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    Shortly after being diagnosed a dozen years ago I was at a celiac conference. The speaker asked who had a reaction to millet and 75% of the people raised their hands. I thought I was reacting to it and asked my doctor about it. He ordered blood work that had to be sent to specialty lab in Nebraska and it showed I'm severely allergic to millet. The lab notes stated that they see a correlation between celiac and millet allergy.

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  • About Me

    Born and raised in Northern California, I am an out going, adventurous individual. I've studied English at Santa Rosa Junior College, and also a bit of business. Throughout my school years English has always been my favorite subject.


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