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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    A GLUTEN-FREE DIET MAY CAUSE CONSTIPATION - TIPS TO STAY HEALTHY FOR LIFE


    Paul Smith

    Celiac.com 12/23/2009 - One of the main and largely unrecognized health problems facing the Western world and people on diets of highly refined, processed and starchy foods, which are often low in or devoid of dietary fiber, is that of constipation. This is a particular issue with Celiacs where the gluten-free flours they use are largely starch based and often low in protein and dietary fiber. Unfortunately, we live in a world where it is often considered normal and acceptable to empty the bowels perhaps 2 -3 times a week, rather than the more desirable 2 – 3 times per day.


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    What are the difficulties in this you may ask?
    Firstly the lymphatic system drains through the bowels and if the bowels are clogged and constipated the lymph system, which is a major part of the human body’s excretory system, does not function properly.  This means that instead of continuously draining, as it should, the lymph system becomes a long term storage system for the body’s waste matter when confronted with a constipated digestive system, which provides a home and breeding ground for bacteria and perhaps becoming a precursor for infection and many chronic health problems including cancer. Constipation also leads to dry and hard stools which are difficult to pass and may contribute to the development of hemorrhoids or “piles”, as they are commonly known, and possibly longer term issues leading to colon and rectal cancers. Constipation also leads to greatly increased and undesirable residence time for waste matter in the body which solidifies and putrifies in the process possibly contributing to various forms of gastric and bowel cancer.


    Other parts of the body’s excretory systems including the sinuses; the lungs and the skin, the body’s largest excretory organ, can also become overloaded if the bowels and lymph system are not functioning correctly. Sinus overload can be reflected in having heavy mucus discharge via a cold or the flu, glandular fever and in nasal, eye and ear infections, from infected, stored mucus. Lung overload may be reflected by mucus discharges associated with a cold or influenza, pleurisy, pneumonia and various other forms of mucus containing fluid which may also become infected by hostile germs and bacteria. Skin overload can be reflected in rashes, eczema, psoriasis, measles, hives, shingles, chicken pox and the like: all symptoms of an acidic body condition and an overloaded elimination or excretory system. If the body cannot dispose of its waste matter by other means, it often resorts to throwing the waste matter out through the skin. Chronic fatigue syndrome is possibly another manifestation of this same issue.


    Sadly, the vast majority of the human race, end their lives with all of their excretory organs, lungs and blood circulatory systems overloaded with stored waste matter with significantly shortened life expectancy and diminished quality of life as a result.


    None of the latter problems have anything to do with or need to be part of the aging process. For example, I have a very spry, mentally alert 90 year old father, A blood group type, who still works on a daily basis, drives a car, is totally medication free, has no prostrate, heart or cancer problems and has a good head of hair; clear skin, eyes, arteries and lungs. He should be the model of normality. Sadly, he is not typical. How and why? A fairly spartan diet based mainly upon fruit and vegetables with very sparing consumption of meat, dairy products, fried foods, salt, sugar, animal fats, cakes, lollies, convenience foods and alcohol. He has never smoked. He drinks mainly water and fresh juice with fresh citrus juice first thing every morning. He eats slowly and chews his food thoroughly. He never overeats. He remains curious, physically active and engaged with the world. My paternal grandmother, Daisy, was still walking around without the aid of a stick at age 106 – 107 with all her faculties and complaining about all the other “old chooks” in the nursing home on their walking frames etc: many of them 40 years her junior. Adequate sleep and minimizing stress is also critical to maintaining good health.


    Most of the chronic health problems facing our community are mainly unnecessary consequences of over indulgence and the accumulations of a lifetime’s bad habits and, in most instances, with a little care these habits are largely avoidable. Fevers and colds are natural processes. They are part of the body’s armoury of natural defense mechanisms for dealing with a cleansing crisis. All too often these and other natural processes are medically suppressed rather than being allowed to run their natural course. They are one of the body’s ways of saying it is overloaded with waste matter and that it needs a chance to deal with this problem. Antibiotics, taken orally, also tend to indiscriminately kill both good and bad gut bacteria often inadvertently disrupting the long term performance of the digestive system to the long term detriment of the patient’s health especially when no restorative probiotics are prescribed as part of the process: which is mainly the case.


    How do we avoid these problems? By a host of small, simple and easily implemented strategies over a lifetime: by a little self discipline and the formulation of good eating and nutritional habits which enable our bodies to function effectively, naturally, healthily and sustainably for a lifetime, as they are intended to. Ill health is not our natural state but one we impose upon ourselves, or otherwise, through our dietary and lifestyle choices, both individually and collectively.


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    Guest SHARON LEVIN

    Posted

    I have had Coeliac Disease,(+ Fibromyalgia.CFS+ME-Cfids+Adrenal Fatigue - in remission 18yrs) due to my decision to change my lifestyle completely, become well enough through study, assistance, guidance, head of research and all functional illnesses South Africa). Knowledge is POWER - adapting that knowledge into everyday usage and imparting them daily in Holistic Practice and public forums a gift I would not have received had I not been so ill!!! All that is needed is self-discipline to BEGIN with, the rest will follow.

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    Mr Paul Smith, thanks again for your beautiful and insightful article on Celiac Disease.

    I'm an Aussie with a small coffee shop in Irvine/California. Your articles about Gluten related subjects have been great for us here.

    all the best,

    Craig

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    I would have liked to see more specific advice and food suggestions in this article for including fiber in the gluten-free diet. Modern people often "overindulge" in processed food because of the hectic lifestyles we lead. I spend a lot more time cooking whole foods than I ever have before, but as a working mom my time is limited.

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    Guest beanpot

    Posted

    This is a wonderful inspiration to remember to eat well, but we should all also get our thyroids checked! Hypothyroidism can also cause constipation through no fault of our own, no matter how well we eat. I've learned that the hard way!

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    Guest Michael Halls

    Posted

    Paul Smith I've been following your articles and they are extremely well placed.

    Thanks for sharing all your information.

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    Guest Paul Smith

    Posted

    I would have liked to see more specific advice and food suggestions in this article for including fiber in the gluten-free diet. Modern people often "overindulge" in processed food because of the hectic lifestyles we lead. I spend a lot more time cooking whole foods than I ever have before, but as a working mom my time is limited.

    I heartily agree with Sue's contention about lack of dietary fibre. Most gluten free diets, flours and baked goods are deficient in dietary fibre. Our F.G. Roberts' brand products are an exception to this rule: we have deliberately set out to ensure that they contain adequate levels of dietary fibre both in the form of fibre and resistant starches, which act as dietary fibre. Most wholefoods, fruit and vegetables contain adequate levels of dietary fibre. It is the highly processed and refined foods which pose the danger. Fibre helps to bulk up what we eat restricting food intake by ensuring a feeling of fullness and also ensuring that our food passes steadily through our digestive systems in an appropriate and timely manner. Salads and vegetables should constitute at least half, and preferably two thirds of what we eat, with carbohydrate about a quarter and meat or some other form of protein the remaining quarter. Many young people, for example, fail to observe this basic balance. Most of us overeat – the portion sizes are too large - and we have the wrong balance between the foods we eat. It is absolutely critical not to overeat. It is also critical to maintain a high metabolic rate by eating more and slightly smaller meals. It is better to eat a good breakfast and a reasonable lunch so that we have the energy to carry us through the day. It is better to eat a smaller evening meal rather than going to bed on a full stomach when there is not sufficient physical activity to utilise the food consumed late in the day.

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    Guest Paul Smith

    Posted

    This is a wonderful inspiration to remember to eat well, but we should all also get our thyroids checked! Hypothyroidism can also cause constipation through no fault of our own, no matter how well we eat. I've learned that the hard way!

    Beanpot, I would agree that correct thyroid function is critical to the avoidance of a multitude of undesirable health problems including constipation, regardless of Coeliac/Celiac status. In Australia, we are finding that many young adults living on poorly balanced, highly processed, convenience food diets, which are almost totally deficient in fresh fruit and vegetables, are contracting Coeliac/Celiac Disease and Diabetes in combination with Thyroid and a variety of other deficiency disease problems. All of these problems are dietary and lifestyle induced.

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    Guest Paul Smith

    Posted

    Mr Paul Smith, thanks again for your beautiful and insightful article on Celiac Disease.

    I'm an Aussie with a small coffee shop in Irvine/California. Your articles about Gluten related subjects have been great for us here.

    all the best,

    Craig

    Hi Craig, great to hear from an Aussie overseas! I'm glad you're finding the articles useful.

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    Guest Paul Smith

    Posted

    Paul Smith I've been following your articles and they are extremely well placed.

    Thanks for sharing all your information.

    Thanks Michael, I appreciate your feedback!

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    Guest Susan

    Posted

    I would have liked to see more specific advice and food suggestions in this article for including fiber in the gluten-free diet. Modern people often "overindulge" in processed food because of the hectic lifestyles we lead. I spend a lot more time cooking whole foods than I ever have before, but as a working mom my time is limited.

    I agree with you Sue. I have been gluten free for 10 days now and I have been constipated every other day. I have been taken psyllium with OJ a couple of times. I have been eating 3 pieces of fruit a day, potatoes, squash and salads. I have a gluten free hot cereal every morning. I will add probiotics but I should have "adjusted" by now. I have also gained 3 lbs (I was 9 lbs above my desired wt when I started!). I do feel better - my sinus problems, my energy and my chronic low level depression are much better. Don't lecture us, we are the converted - give us practical tips.

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    Guest MD w/Guts

    Posted

    I agree with you Sue. I have been gluten free for 10 days now and I have been constipated every other day. I have been taken psyllium with OJ a couple of times. I have been eating 3 pieces of fruit a day, potatoes, squash and salads. I have a gluten free hot cereal every morning. I will add probiotics but I should have "adjusted" by now. I have also gained 3 lbs (I was 9 lbs above my desired wt when I started!). I do feel better - my sinus problems, my energy and my chronic low level depression are much better. Don't lecture us, we are the converted - give us practical tips.

    I was recently diagnosed with gluten allergy and shortly found I am also lactose intolerant. I eat several servings of fresh fruit and vegetables daily (real ones, not corn and green beans). I eat plenty of legumes and nuts for protein and occasional lean meat. I avoid bananas, cooked carrots, cooked apples, and of course cheese. I used to avoid starchy foods like rice and oatmeal and ate mostly whole grain whole wheat foods with low glycemic index and high fiber cereals full of gluten (No wonder breakfast always made me sick). While I have always had difficulty with my bowels (we are NOT all born the same), it was always controlled with my fiber intake. Most of me feels MUCH better and I will forever be grateful to my Ophthalmologist for this step in the right direction, but now I can not use the restroom for anything.

    As a physician, I know there is always Miralax (now over the counter) that I could use daily, but I would rather find something more natural that gluten/lactose and latex intolerant people could regulate with. When extra flax seed, probiotics and omega 3's don't help- it's frustrating for us crunchy granola earthy people to settle on an unatural cure. Any actual suggestions.

    I am actually a physician, and personally take offense to the arrogant nature of this article. There is actually no helpful information, and most of us that bother to actually follow the advise, live gluten free, and do our research, are likely already not living like the millions of glutonous, slothful Americans that we sit next to daily.

    Please remember your audience next time you write.

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    I agree with you Sue. I have been gluten free for 10 days now and I have been constipated every other day. I have been taken psyllium with OJ a couple of times. I have been eating 3 pieces of fruit a day, potatoes, squash and salads. I have a gluten free hot cereal every morning. I will add probiotics but I should have "adjusted" by now. I have also gained 3 lbs (I was 9 lbs above my desired wt when I started!). I do feel better - my sinus problems, my energy and my chronic low level depression are much better. Don't lecture us, we are the converted - give us practical tips.

    Hi Susan - It sounds like you need to up your intake of dietary fat. Contrary to popular belief, dietary fat and not fiber is what allows us to open our bowels. Have some full-fat Greek yoghurt or pure cream with your meals. Fiber DOES increase the volume of stools, but it won't ease bad constipation - it actually "plugs up the pipes".

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    Perhaps it is more the way the gluten free diet has been taken over and a surplus of starches have been promoted to replace the gluten we once ate. I am going gluten-free because of constipation. Funny huh? But my main focus is eating adequate veggies, fruits, nuts, beans, and proteins before finding ways to replace the grains I once ate.

     

    This truly how the gluten free dieters need to look at their food but alas in developed countries temptation to as everyone else is so strong.

     

    I have done the gluten free diet focusing on whole foods before and was able to stabilize my bowl movements to daily or more than daily. I was wonderful but very hard living with my loved ones note understanding that I eat healthy to not have gas, bloating, and pain.

     

    They all tend to think that I have some kind of bad self image and am trying to lose weight. Which at this moment would be dumb for I am pregnant.

     

    Overall it is difficult to eat healthy and face up to the constant criticism that folks flippantly toss out. I know many folks blabber comments because of personal guilt but it would be helpful if they would just leave well enough alone.

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    After trying to go gluten free, I just can't be successful. I always feel bad. I just think is not normal. Something must be wrong with us. Maybe is the lack of exercise! I am also tired of people saying that is Candida. As I said something is wrong with us, many people is sick. Some people go gluten free, other are 100% vegans, and others take hormonal replacement, metabolism medication, and medication for autoimmune diseases. But none of these people get 90% better, they just get 70-75% better and pay a high price for this. It is just not normal. I still think maybe is the lack of exercise and big portion of meals. People from other countries don't have this problem. THEY JUST DON'T! I know this very well. I have been in different continents and they don't have this problem. They live in poverty, take antibiotics, and sometimes don't even have food to eat. And they still don't have all these health problems.

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    Five steps to constipation-free living. (1) Go gluten-free (2) If gluten-free doesn't work, cut the processed foods, including gluten-free breads, cakes, etc. (3) Up your water intake - say bye-bye to alcohol, juice, soda, etc (4) Embrace a low-fibre diet - google "Fibre Menace" for a detailed explanation (5) Still constipated? Learn to squat on the toilet or buy a squat (oriental) toilet. Westerners are constipated not only because of sugary diets, but also because of our incorrect toilet posture which prevents us from fully emptying our bowels.

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    Guest tynegate

    Posted

    I was recently diagnosed with gluten allergy and shortly found I am also lactose intolerant. I eat several servings of fresh fruit and vegetables daily (real ones, not corn and green beans). I eat plenty of legumes and nuts for protein and occasional lean meat. I avoid bananas, cooked carrots, cooked apples, and of course cheese. I used to avoid starchy foods like rice and oatmeal and ate mostly whole grain whole wheat foods with low glycemic index and high fiber cereals full of gluten (No wonder breakfast always made me sick). While I have always had difficulty with my bowels (we are NOT all born the same), it was always controlled with my fiber intake. Most of me feels MUCH better and I will forever be grateful to my Ophthalmologist for this step in the right direction, but now I can not use the restroom for anything.

    As a physician, I know there is always Miralax (now over the counter) that I could use daily, but I would rather find something more natural that gluten/lactose and latex intolerant people could regulate with. When extra flax seed, probiotics and omega 3's don't help- it's frustrating for us crunchy granola earthy people to settle on an unatural cure. Any actual suggestions.

    I am actually a physician, and personally take offense to the arrogant nature of this article. There is actually no helpful information, and most of us that bother to actually follow the advise, live gluten free, and do our research, are likely already not living like the millions of glutonous, slothful Americans that we sit next to daily.

    Please remember your audience next time you write.

    I found the original article very helpful for diagnosis, but missed treatment advice. So I appreciated your personal comment.

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    Guest Rene

    Posted

    I read this paragraph completely on the topic of the comparison of hottest and previous technologies, it's an awesome article.

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    When our daughter was almost three years old, we left the West Coast and relocated to Northern Illinois. A place where severe weather is a common occurrence. Since the age of two, I noticed that my daughter appeared gaunt, had an incredibly distended belly, along with gas, stomach pain, low weight, slow growth, unusual looking stool, and a dislike for pizza, hotdog buns, crackers, Toast, etc. The phone call from our doctor overwhelmed me.  She was diagnosed with Celiac Disease. I broke down into tears sobbing. What am I going to feed my child? Gluten is everywhere.
    After being scoped at Children's Hospital of Chicago, and my daughters Celiac Disease officially confirmed, I worried about her getting all the nutrients her under nourished body so desperately needed. I already knew she had a peanut allergy from blood tests, but just assumed she would be safe with other nuts. I was so horribly wrong. After feeding her a small bite of a pistachio, which she immediately spit out, nuts would become her enemy. Her anaphylactic reaction came within minutes of taking a bite of that pistachio. She was complaining of horrible stomach cramps when the vomiting set in. She then went limp and starting welting. We called 911.
    Now we never leave home without our Epipens and our gluten free food supplies. We analyze every food label. We are hyper vigilant about cross contamination. We are constantly looking for welts and praying for no stomach pain. We are always prepared and on guard. It's just what we do now. Anything to protect our child, our love...like so many other parents out there have to do every moment of ever day!  
    Then, my second brush with a natural disaster happened, without any notice, leaving us once again scrambling to find a safe place to shelter. It was a warm and muggy summer morning, and my husband was away on a business trip leaving my young daughter and me to enjoy our summer day. Our Severe Weather Alert Radio was going off, again, as I continued getting our daughter ready for gymnastics.  Having gotten used to the (what seemed to be daily) “Severe Thunderstorm warning,” I didn’t pay much attention to it. I continued downstairs with my daughter and our dog, when I caught a glimpse out the window of an incredibly black looking cloud. By the time I got downstairs, I saw the cover to our grill literally shoot straight up into the air. Because we didn’t have a fenced in yard, I quickly ran outside and chased the cover, when subsequently, I saw my neighbor’s lawn furniture blow pass me. I quickly realized I made a big mistake going outside. As I ran back inside, I heard debris hitting the front of our home.  Our dog was the first one to the basement door! As we sat huddled in the dark corner of our basement, I was once again thinking where are we going to go if our house is destroyed. I was not prepared, and I should have been. I should have learned my lesson the first time. Once the storm passed, we quickly realized we were without power and most of our trees were destroyed. We were lucky that our house had minimal damage, but that wasn’t true for most of the area surrounding us.  We were without power for five days. We lost most of our food - our gluten free food.
    That is when I knew we had to be prepared. No more winging it. We couldn’t take a chance like that ever again. We were “lucky” one too many times. We were very fortunate that we did not lose our home to the Los Angeles wildfire, and only had minimal damage from the severe storm which hit our home in Illinois.
      
    In 2017 alone, FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) had 137 natural disasters declared within the United States. According to FEMA, around 50% of the United States population isn’t prepared for a natural disaster. These disasters can happen anywhere, anytime and some without notice. It’s hard enough being a parent, let alone being a parent of a gluten free family member. Now, add a natural disaster on top of that. Are you prepared?
    You can find my Gluten Free Emergency Food Bags and other useful products at www.allergynavigator.com.  

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/23/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to learn whether celiac disease patients commonly suffer cognitive impairment at the time they are diagnosed, and to compare their cognitive performance with non-celiac subjects with similar chronic symptoms and to a group of healthy control subjects.
    The research team included G Longarini, P Richly, MP Temprano, AF Costa, H Vázquez, ML Moreno, S Niveloni, P López, E Smecuol, R Mazure, A González, E Mauriño, and JC Bai. They are variously associated with the Small Bowel Section, Department of Medicine, Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital; Neurocience Cognitive and Traslational Institute (INECO), Favaloro Fundation, CONICET, Buenos Aires; the Brain Health Center (CESAL), Quilmes, Argentina; the Research Council, MSAL, CABA; and with the Research Institute, School of Medicine, Universidad del Salvador.
    The team enrolled fifty adults with symptoms and indications of celiac disease in a prospective cohort without regard to the final diagnosis.  At baseline, all individuals underwent cognitive functional and psychological evaluation. The team then compared celiac disease patients with subjects without celiac disease, and with healthy controls matched by sex, age, and education.
    Celiac disease patients had similar cognitive performance and anxiety, but no significant differences in depression scores compared with disease controls.
    A total of thirty-three subjects were diagnosed with celiac disease. Compared with the 26 healthy control subjects, the 17 celiac disease subjects, and the 17 disease control subjects, who mostly had irritable bowel syndrome, showed impaired cognitive performance (P=0.02 and P=0.04, respectively), functional impairment (P<0.01), and higher depression (P<0.01). 
    From their data, the team noted that any abnormal cognitive functions they saw in adults with newly diagnosed celiac disease did not seem not to be a result of the disease itself. 
    Their results indicate that cognitive dysfunction in celiac patients could be related to long-term symptoms from chronic disease, in general.
    Source:
    J Clin Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 1. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0000000000001018.

    Connie Sarros
    Celiac.com 04/21/2018 - Dear Friends and Readers,
    I have been writing articles for Scott Adams since the 2002 Summer Issue of the Scott-Free Press. The Scott-Free Press evolved into the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. I felt honored when Scott asked me ten years ago to contribute to his quarterly journal and it's been a privilege to write articles for his publication ever since.
    Due to personal health reasons and restrictions, I find that I need to retire. My husband and I can no longer travel the country speaking at conferences and to support groups (which we dearly loved to do) nor can I commit to writing more books, articles, or menus. Consequently, I will no longer be contributing articles to the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. 
    My following books will still be available at Amazon.com:
    Gluten-free Cooking for Dummies Student's Vegetarian Cookbook for Dummies Wheat-free Gluten-free Dessert Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Reduced Calorie Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Cookbook for Kids and Busy Adults (revised version) My first book was published in 1996. My journey since then has been incredible. I have met so many in the celiac community and I feel blessed to be able to call you friends. Many of you have told me that I helped to change your life – let me assure you that your kind words, your phone calls, your thoughtful notes, and your feedback throughout the years have had a vital impact on my life, too. Thank you for all of your support through these years.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/20/2018 - A digital media company and a label data company are teaming up to help major manufacturers target, reach and convert their desired shoppers based on dietary needs, such as gluten-free diet. The deal could bring synergy in emerging markets such as the gluten-free and allergen-free markets, which represent major growth sectors in the global food industry. 
    Under the deal, personalized digital media company Catalina will be joining forces with Label Insight. Catalina uses consumer purchases data to target shoppers on a personal base, while Label Insight works with major companies like Kellogg, Betty Crocker, and Pepsi to provide insight on food label data to government, retailers, manufacturers and app developers.
    "Brands with very specific product benefits, gluten-free for example, require precise targeting to efficiently reach and convert their desired shoppers,” says Todd Morris, President of Catalina's Go-to-Market organization, adding that “Catalina offers the only purchase-based targeting solution with this capability.” 
    Label Insight’s clients include food and beverage giants such as Unilever, Ben & Jerry's, Lipton and Hellman’s. Label Insight technology has helped the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) build the sector’s very first scientifically accurate database of food ingredients, health attributes and claims.
    Morris says the joint partnership will allow Catalina to “enhance our dataset and further increase our ability to target shoppers who are currently buying - or have shown intent to buy - in these emerging categories,” including gluten-free, allergen-free, and other free-from foods.
    The deal will likely make for easier, more precise targeting of goods to consumers, and thus provide benefits for manufacturers and retailers looking to better serve their retail food customers, especially in specialty areas like gluten-free and allergen-free foods.
    Source:
    fdfworld.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/19/2018 - Previous genome and linkage studies indicate the existence of a new disease triggering mechanism that involves amino acid metabolism and nutrient sensing signaling pathways. In an effort to determine if amino acids might play a role in the development of celiac disease, a team of researchers recently set out to investigate if plasma amino acid levels differed among children with celiac disease compared with a control group.
     
    The research team included Åsa Torinsson Naluai, Ladan Saadat Vafa, Audur H. Gudjonsdottir, Henrik Arnell, Lars Browaldh, and Daniel Agardh. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Karolinska University Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institute, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Diabetes & Celiac Disease Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; and with the Nathan S Kline Institute in the U.S.A.
    First, the team used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to analyze amino acid levels in fasting plasma samples from 141 children with celiac disease and 129 non-celiac disease controls. They then crafted a general linear model using age and experimental effects as covariates to compare amino acid levels between children with celiac disease and non-celiac control subjects.
    Compared with the control group, seven out of twenty-three children with celiac disease showed elevated levels of the the following amino acids: tryptophan; taurine; glutamic acid; proline; ornithine; alanine; and methionine.
    The significance of the individual amino acids do not survive multiple correction, however, multivariate analyses of the amino acid profile showed significantly altered amino acid levels in children with celiac disease overall and after correction for age, sex and experimental effects.
    This study shows that amino acids can influence inflammation and may play a role in the development of celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764