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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com.

    Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book Dangerous Grains by James Braly, MD and Ron Hoggan, MA.

  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/21/2009 - Failure of the hepatitis B vaccine in people with celiac disease is common. In fact, vaccine failure occurs in about 50% of all attempts to vaccinate people with celiac disease against hepatitis B. Research shows that age at celiac diagnosis and other factors can influence response rates.
    The August 12 issue of the medical journal Vaccine features a timely article on failure of the hepatitis B vaccine in people with celiac disease, which asks the very sensible question of whether it is time to reevaluate our current vaccine procedures.
    One of the most important signs of non-responsiveness to the hepatitis B vaccine is a genetic marker called human leukocyte antigen (HLA) phenotype DQ2. It's interesting that people with celiac disease often carry these same genetic markers, and that fact is at the center of one hypothesis about why celiac patients are less able to respond to the hepatitis B vaccine.
    A team of researchers recently set out to assess responsiveness rates to the hepatitis B vaccine among patients with celiac disease. The team was made up of S. Leonardi, M. Spina, L. Spicuzza, N. Rotolo, and M. La Rosa of the Broncho-Pneumology & Cystic Fibrosis Unit of the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Catania, in Catania, Italy.
    The team describes the results of a retrospective study on celiac patients vaccinated with three intramuscular injections of recombinant hepatitis B vaccine (Engerix in doses of 10mug at 3, 5 and 11 months of age.
    Their results showed that half of the celiac disease patients (50%) failed to respond to the vaccine course, and that those who did best were less than 18 months of age at the time of diagnosis for celiac disease; that group showed a significantly higher response rate to the vaccine.
    The study confirms that celiac patients have a far higher failure rate for hepatitis B vaccination than healthy control subjects. These results strengthen the call to re-evaluate current hepatitis B vaccine strategies for patients with celiac disease and to assess whether to recommend a course of re-vaccination.
    Source: Vaccine - August 12, 2009.


    Jefferson Adams
    5 Things People With Celiac Disease Need You to Understand
    Celiac.com 06/12/2014 - Here are five things people with celiac disease need regular folks to know about celiac disease:
    We are NOT on a Fad Diet—Celiac disease is not some vague, make-believe condition. Celiac disease is a potentially serious immune disorder that, if left untreated, can lead to a very deadly types of stomach, intestinal, and other cancers. Just because a bunch of people seem to think that gluten is the new high fructose corn syrup, doesn’t mean that I’m one of them. Remember, for people with celiac disease, gluten is no joke, and avoiding gluten is the only way to stay healthy. We Won’t Be Getting Over It—Currently, there is no cure for celiac disease, and the only treatment is a gluten-free diet. That’s the only way to avoid the gut damage, lower risks for other types of auto-immune conditions, and minimize the risk of various types of cancer associated with celiac disease. Celiac Disease is a Serious Condition—Since the effects of untreated celiac disease unfold slowly over time, it’s tempting for some people to look at celiac disease as a minor inconvenience. However, it’s important to understand that celiac disease is a potentially serious autoimmune disorder that, if left untreated, can leave people susceptible to other autoimmune conditions, and to deadly types of stomach, intestinal, and other cancers.  A ‘Little Gluten’ Might Hurt Me—There’s no such thing as ‘a little gluten’ to people with celiac disease. Gut damage happens with as little as 20 parts of gluten per million. That is a microscopic amount. A 'gluten-free' diet means no gluten. Period. When in Doubt, Ask—If you’re not sure if I can safely eat a certain ingredient, or a certain food, just ask. Figuring out what is or is not gluten-free can be tricky, even for me. So, it's best to ask if you're not positive. Can you think of others?
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 10/06/2014 - Anyone who has ever had difficulty ordering gluten-free food at a restaurant can likely appreciate the scene that recently played out at a San Francisco restaurant called SO.
    After back-to-back problems with “rude customers,” employees of the eatery staged a walkout. The next morning, the management posted a sign that not only made their feelings clear about the situation, but let no doubt about they position on MSG, organic food, and gluten-free food.
    The sign read:
    We are CLOSED  
    Because of You  
     
    (Customers)  
    SO…  
    *YES we use MSG!  
     
    SO…  
     
    *We don’t believe in organic food  
     
    AND…don’t give a  
     
    s$#& about gluten free  
    The walkout allegedly occurred after one party refused to pay for food they said was ‘too spicy,’ and another cursed at the owner.
    Granted, the dustup likely has more to do with rude patrons than with difficult gluten-free diners, but the management is making it clear that this is one place you will not be getting gluten-free food.
    It’s too early to tell whether the SO will suffer any blowback from their actions, but stay tuned for further updates.
    Here is the Yelp! page for SO.
    In the meantime, what do you think? Are you offended at the owner’s attitude? Or maybe happy they have made their position so clear? Or confused to see gluten-free lumped in with MSG and organic food?

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/13/2015 - In addition to being a common ingredient in many commercial food products, gluten is also used in numerous medications, supplements, and vitamins, often as an inert ingredient known as an excipient.
    Because chronic gluten-related inflammation and damage impairs absorption of nutrients, and likely causes malabsorption of oral medications, it is extremely important for people with celiac disease to review the nutrition labels of all foods and beverages, as well as the package inserts (PI) for information about gluten content.
    Most oral medications depend on absorption through the small intestine via passive diffusion. GI-tract damage may shift this diffusion process into systemic circulation, which can result in increased or decreased absorption, depending on the drug molecules.
    Since drug molecules have varying and unique chemical properties, it is hard to determine the exact means of drug absorption in celiac patients, and also hard to determine the impact of celiac disease on drug absorption.
    Based on their molecular properties, researchers suspect the absorption of a number of drugs is impaired by gluten sensitivity.
    These drugs include: acetaminophen, aspirin, indomethacin, levothyroxine, prednisolone, propranolol, and certain antibiotics.
    For these reasons, it is important for doctors to monitor serum drug levels for medications with narrow therapeutic indexes in people with celiac disease. If you have celiac disease, please let your doctor know before you take these drugs.
    Source:
    US Pharmacist. 2014;39(12):44-48.

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