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    Be My Gluten-free Valentine!


    Jefferson Adams
    Image Caption: Photo: gluten-free cookies from Beautiful Sweets.

    Celiac.com 02/08/2011 - Valentine's Day is upon us once again, and, once again, the options are many. Dine in? Dine out? Sweets or no sweets? Chocolates? Cakes? Candies? How to make sure it's all gluten-free?


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    The choices can be daunting enough, but for people with a gluten-free spouse or loved one, those choices can make or break a Valentine's Day celebration.

    To make things easier and to help you have the best possible gluten-free Valentine's Day, celiac.com has prepared this list of ideas and tips.

    Candy:
    For a comprehensive list of gluten-free candies, please see Celiac.com's Gluten-friendly and Gluten-Free Candy and Treats.

    Dine-in:
    For an easy, intimate Valentine's dinner at home, try gluten-free Cornish Game Hens.

    Dessert:

    Gluten-free Chocolate Valentine's Mousse

    Ingredients:
    8 strawberries (optional)
    Chocolate Hearts (optional)
    1/3 cup sugar
    3 tablespoons cornstarch
    1 cup milk
    ½ cup water
    4 egg yolks, beaten
    1 ¾ cups Hershey's Semi-Sweet Chocolate Chips or Hershey's Milk Chocolate Chips
    1 teaspoon vanilla extract
    ¾ cup whipping cream, whipped
    ½ cup whipping cream, whipped

    Directions:

    1. Prepare Chocolate Hearts.
    2. Stir together sugar and cornstarch in medium heavy saucepan. Stir in milk and water. Cook and stir over medium-high heat until boiling. Stir about half of hot mixture into beaten egg yolks. Return all to saucepan. Boil gently 1 minute, stirring constantly. Remove from heat.
    3. Add chocolate chips and vanilla to hot mixture; stir until chocolate is melted. Pour into small metal bowl. Set bowl inside a larger bowl filled with ice water. Beat on high speed of mixer about 5 minutes or until chocolate mixture is completely cooled. Fold in the whipped ¾ cup cream. Spoon into martini glasses or dessert dishes.
    4. Cover lightly with plastic wrap. Refrigerate 30 minutes or up to 2 days. Just before serving, top each with a dollop of the whipped ½ cup cream and a strawberry, if desired. Peel chocolate hearts from wax paper; place one on each dessert. 8 servings.
    Chocolate Hearts: Place ¼ cup Hershey's Semi-Sweet Chocolate Chips or Milk Chocolate Chips and ½ teaspoon shortening (do not use butter, margarine, spread or oil) in small microwave-safe bowl. Microwave at HIGH (100%) 45 seconds; stir until melted. Let stand 2 minutes. Pour into heavy duty small plastic bag, Cut off a tiny corner of the bag. Squeeze bag to pipe mixture into heart shapes on wax paper. Refrigerate until firm.

    Tip: To form perfectly shaped chocolate hearts, trace around a small heart-shaped cookie cutter on a piece of white paper. Tape wax paper over the white paper; pipe chocolate on wax paper following the outline.

    For an alternative to chocolate mousse, gluten-free baked apples make a great Valentine's treat.

    If baking is the path to the heart of your beloved, then try making this flowerless chocolate cake.

    Flourless Chocolate Valentine's Cake

    Ingredients:
    8-10 strawberries
    1/2 cup water
    1/4 teaspoon salt
    3/4 cup white sugar
    1 tablespoon of powdered sugar
    18 ounces bittersweet chocolate in small pieces
    1 cup unsalted butter
    6 eggs
    Sprig of mint (garnish)

    Directions:
    Heat oven to 300 degrees F (150 degrees C).

    Grease one 10 inch round cake pan and set aside.

    In a small saucepan over medium heat combine the water, salt and sugar. Stir until completely dissolved and set aside.

    Use a double boiler or a microwave oven to melt the bittersweet chocolate.

    Pour the melted chocolate into a mixing bowl.

    Cut the butter into small pieces and beat the butter into the chocolate, 1 piece at a time. Beat in the hot sugar-water. Slowly beat in the eggs, one at a time.

    Pour the mixture into the greased cake pan.

    Fill a pan that is larger than the cake pan halfway with boiling water.

    Place the cake pan and mixture into the pan with the boiling water.

    Bake cake in the water bath at 300 degrees F (150 degrees C) for 45 minutes. When the cake is done, the center will still look wet.

    Remove the pan from the water and place in a refrigerator overnight. To release from the mold, place the bottom of the cake pan in hot water for 10-15 seconds and flip onto a serving plate. Dust with powdered sugar. Garnish each slice with strawberry, and a sprig of mint.

    Gluten-free Valentine Cookie Delivery:
    If baking is the key to your gluten-free Valentine's heart, yet you have no time to bake, try ordering some delicious gluten-free cookies from Beautiful Sweets, the cookies Al Rokker calls "the most beautiful cookies in the world."

    Dine-out:
    Dining out at a romantic restaurant is a time-honored way to put a smile on your Valentine's face. You'll get extra points if you can pull off a romantic Valentine restaurant dinner for your gluten-free loved one.

    Remember, certain types of cuisine are more naturally gluten-free than others. Generally speaking, Asian, Mexican, Central- and South American cuisines are a good bet. However, with a bit of scouting, even Italian can deliver a great gluten-free Valentine's dinner.

    Many full-service Italian restaurant feature secondi piatti, such as roasted meats, seafoods, and risottos, Many of these are gluten-free, or can be prepared without flour.

    Whatever cuisine you choose, be sure to call ahead to the restaurant, and to ask about any menu item, or method of preparation if you are not sure about the gluten status.

    So, the key to a great gluten-free Valentine's Day is a bit of planning, some double-checking, and dash of pure romance.

    With those things in your favor, your'e sure to deliver a great gluten-free Valentine's Day!

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 10/11/2010 - Halloween is upon us again, and for parents of children who must avoid gluten, a simple walk down the store candy aisle can present a daunting challenge: How to know with certainty which candies, especially seasonal candies, are safe for kids on a gluten-free diet?
    The good news this year is that awareness of gluten-sensitivity and gluten-free issues is on the rise, and more parents are demanding gluten-free candy choices. Also, more manufacturers are now identifying their candies as gluten-free, giving parents and trick-or-treaters a wider range of choices.
    It's easy to find gluten-free specialty candies from a reliable source. But, since more mainstream treats are common on Halloween night, it's helpful to know which ones are safe.
    Below you will find the latest gluten-friendly and gluten-free lists of candies which were current as of the date of this article. Below that you will also find a list of unsafe, NON-gluten-free candies, and a partial list of manufacturers with links to their websites. Remember, the list is meant to be used as a gauge, and is not meant to be authoritative or comprehensive. Adjust your vigilance according to your own sensitivity levels, or those of your children.
    Gluten-friendly and Gluten-Free (Safe) Candy and Treats for Halloween

    3 Musketeers fun size
    3 Musketeers Mint with dark chocolateA
    Act II Popcorn Balls
    Albert’s Gummy Eyeballs
    Albert’s Iced Halloween pops (lollipops)
    Almond Joy fun size bars
    Amanda's Own Confections Chocolate shapes and chocolate lollipops
    Annie's Organic Bunny Fruit Snacks
    Applehead, Grapehead, Cherryhead,
    B
    Baby Ruth
    Bazooka Big Mix (includes bubble gum, bubble gum filled candy, candy chews, and bubble gum filled lollipops)
    Betty Crocker Fruit by the Foot Wicked Webs Berry Wave mini feet
    Betty Crocker Halloween fruit flavored snacks – “Gluten Free”
    Bit•O•Honey
    Butterfinger fun size
    Big Blow bubblegum
    Black Forest Gummy Tarantulas
    Black Forest Gummy Fun Bugs Juicy Oozers
    Bubbly lollipop + gum
    C
    Candy Checkers (made for Target)
    Caramel Apple Pops (lollipops made by Tootsie Roll)
    Charleston Chew fun size
    Charms Blow Pops
    Charms Candy Carnival Package (Blow Pops, Sugar Babies, Zip a Dee mini pops, Sugar Daddy, Pops, Sugar Mama Caramel, Tear Jerkers sour bubble gum, Blow Pop Bubble Gum)
    Charms Fluffy Stuff Spider Web cotton candy
    Chewy Atomic Fireballs
    Chewy Lemonheads and Friends
    Child’s Play
    Colombina Scary Eyeballs bubblegum
    Colombina Fizzy Pops
    Comix Mix Candy Sticks (Tom and Jerry, Flintstones, Scooby Doo, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Popeye) – “Gluten Free”
    Cracker Jack caramel coated popcorn and peanuts
    Disney Halloween Candy Mix (jelly beans, gummies, candy bracelets and candy characters from Cars, Tinkerbell and Toy Story)
    Dove pieces (Dark Chocolate, Milk Chocolate, Peanut Butter Milk Chocolate, Caramel Milk Chocolate)
    D
    Dots Gumdrops – including Candy Corn Dots (candy corn flavored), Ghost Dots (assorted fruit flavored), and Bat Dots (blood orange flavored)
    Dubble Bubble bubblegum
    Dum Dum Lollipops (including Shrek Pops) – “This product does not contain peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, wheat or gluten. It has been manufactured on dedicated equipment.”
    Dum Dum Chewy Pops – “This product does not contain peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, wheat or gluten. It has been manufactured on dedicated equipment.”
    F
    Farley’s Kiddie Mix (includes Smarties, SweetTarts, Now and Later, Jaw Breakers, Super Bubble and Lolli-pops)
    Ferrara Pan Caramels
    Ferrara Pan Lemonhead & Friends candy mix (includes Applehead, Cherryhead, Grapehead, Chewy Lemonhead & Friends, Chewy Atomic Fireball, and Red Hots)
    Florida’s Natural Healthy Treats Nuggets, Sour String, Fruit Stiks – “Gluten Free”
    Fright Fingers Popcorn Kit
    Frankford’s Bugs Gummy Candy
    Frankford’s Gummy Body Parts
    Frankford’s Marshmallow Pals
    Fun Dip
    Fun Dip Sour
    G
    Game Night boxes of candy game pieces (includes Operation, Sorry!, Monopoly, Life, and Clue)
    Grave Gummies (Yummy Gummies)
    Gummy Pirate Choppers
    H
    Heath milk chocolate English toffee bar snack size
    Hershey’s Kisses - Milk Chocolate Only!!
    Hershey’s Milk Chocolate snack size bars (1.55 ounce)
    Hershey’s Milk Chocolate with Almonds snack size bars
    Hot Tamales – “Gluten Free”
    Humphrey Popcorn Balls
    J
    Jelly Belly beans are gluten-free and dairy-free
    Jolly Rancher hard candy and Doubles Candy
    Jolly Rancher lollipops and sticks
    Jr. Mints fun size
    Jujyfruits
    Just Born marshmallow treats
    K
    Kellogg’s Spongebob Squarepants fruit flavored snacks
    Kraft Jet-Puffed Boo Mallows marshmallows
    L
    Lemonheads
    LiveSavers Gummies
    M
    M&M’s – original, peanut, peanut butter
    Mars M&M's (all EXCEPT Pretzel M&M's)
    Mars Dove chocolate products (all)
    Mars Munch Nut bar
    Mars Snickers & Snickers Dark bars
    Mallo Cup
    Marvel Heroes Candy Sticks (Hulk, Spiderman, Wolverine) – “Gluten Free.”
    Melster Peanut Butter Kisses
    Milk Duds
    Mike and Ike – “Gluten Free”
    Mini Mentos
    Mini Sour Dudes Straws
    Monstaz Pops (jack-o-lantern lollipops)
    Monster Hunt plastic monster eggs filled with candy bones, skulls and pumpkins (made for Target)
    Mounds dark chocolate fun size bars
    Mr. Goodbar
    N
    Necco’s Sky Bar 4 in 1 chocolate bar
    Necco Wafers
    Necco Mary Janes
    Necco Mary Jane Peanut Butter Kisses
    Necco Sweethearts Conversation Hearts (available for Valentine's Day only)
    Necco Canada Mint & Wintergreen Lozenges
    Necco Haviland Thin Mints and Candy Stix
    Necco Clark Bars
    Necco Skybars
    Necco Haviland Peppermint & Wintergreen Patties
    Necco Candy Eggs
    Necco Talking Pumpkins (available at Halloween only)
    Necco Squirrel Nut Caramels and Squirrel Nut Zippers
    Necco Banana Split and Mint Julep Chews
    Necco Ultramints
    Nestle Milk Chocolate fun size bars
    Nestle Baby Ruth
    Nestle Bit-O-Honey
    Nestle Butterfinger (but NOT the Butterfinger Crisp or the Butterfinger Stixx)
    Nestle Goobers
    Nestle Nips (both regular and sugar-free)
    Nestle Oh Henry!
    Nestle Raisinets and Sno-Caps
    Nestle Wonka Pixy Stix
    Nestle Wonka Laffy Taffy
    Nestle Wonka Lik-M-Aid Fun Dip
    Nestle Wonka Spree
    O
    Operation Gummy Candy
    P
    Palmer Peanut Butter Cups
    Pay Day peanut caramel bar snack size
    Peanut M&M’s
    Pearson’s Bun candy -  maple and roasted peanuts
    Peeps Jack-o-lanterns, Ghosts and Chocolate Mousse Cats – “Gluten Free”
    Pez candy – “Gluten Free”
    Pop Rocks
    Pixie Stix
    R
    Rain•Blo Bubble Gum Eyes of Terror
    Raisinets
    Red Hots
    Reese’s Fast Break candy bars and snack size
    Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups snack size and miniatures
    Reese’s Peanut Butter Pumpkins
    Reese’s Pieces
    Reese’s Select Peanut Butter Cremes
    Reese’s Select Clusters
    Reese’s Whipps
    Rolo chocolate covered caramels
    S
    Sixlets
    Skeleton Pops (lollipops)
    Skittles fun size – “Gluten Free”
    Skittles Crazy Cores fun size – “Gluten Free”
    Skittles Sour fun size – “Gluten Free”
    Smarties – the small pastel-colored candies sold in rolls, not Nestle’s chocolate version) – “Contains none of the following: gluten (from wheat, barley, oats and rye), milk, egg, fish, crustacean shellfish, tree nuts, wheat, peanuts, or soy beans.”
    Snickers
    Snickers Fudge bar
    Sour Patch
    Starburst Fruit Chews fun size – “Gluten Free”
    Starburst Gummibursts and Sour Gummibursts – “Gluten Free”
    Sugar Babies
    Sugar Daddy Caramel Pops
    Super Bubble bubble gum
    Swedish Fish treat size
    Sweethearts conversation hearts Forbidden Fruits (candy packaging of The Twilight Saga, New Moon the movie)
    Sweet’s Candy Corn Taffy – “This product is Gluten Free”
    T
    Tootsie Pops (original and miniatures)
    Tootsie Rolls midgies and snack bars
    Transformers Candy Mix – gummy shields, fruit chews, candy shields, gum rocks
    W
    Warheads – Extreme Sour hard candy and Sour QBZ chewy cubes
    Wonka Bottlecaps
    Wonka Chocolate Laffy Taffy
    Wonka Giant Chewy Nerds Jelly Beans
    Wonka Giant Pixy Stix
    Wonka Gobstopper Everlasting
    Wonka Gobstopper Chewy
    Wonka Laffy Taffy Ropes
    Wonka Mix-Ups
    Wonka Monster Mix-Ups – SweetTarts Skulls and Bones, Spooky Nerds, Howlin’ Laffy Taffy
    Wonka Nerds – carry a cross contamination warning on the Spooky Nerds orange and fruit punch flavors
    Wonka Pixy Stix
    Wonka Runts
    Wonka Runts Chewy
    Wonka SweetTarts
    Wonka Sweetarts (regular)
    Wonka Sweetarts Chew
    Wonka Sweetarts Giant Chewy
    Wonka Sweetarts Mini Chew
    Wonka Sweetarts Chewy Twists
    Wonka Sweetarts Shockers
    Wonka Tart N Tinys,
    Wonka Tart N Tinys Chew
    Wonka SweetTarts Boo Bag Mix (SweetTart Chews were OK, but other packages in the bag were labeled with a cross-contamination warning. See list below.)
    X
    X-scream Mouth Morphers Fruit Gushers – “Gluten Free”
    Y
    York Peppermint Patties Pumpkins
    Z
    Zed Candy Skulls and Bones (fruit flavored hard candy)


    With all these selections, finding some good, gluten-free candy should be a snap. As always, be sure to read labels, as some ingredients can vary.
    **WARNING! THESE UNSAFE CANDIES CONTAIN GLUTEN:
    AIRHEADS
    Airheads Xtremes Rolls contains wheat flourANNABELLE’S
    Rocky Road – contains barley malt and wheat flour
    BRACH'S
    All Brach's candy should be considered NOT gluten-free
    HERSHEY
    Kit Kat – contains wheat
    Twizzlers – contains wheat
    Whoppers –  contains barley malt and wheat flour
    MARS and WRIGLEY
    Milky Way –  contains barley malt
    Twix –  contains wheat
    NESTLE
    Butterfinger Crisp –  contains wheat flour
    Crunch –  contains barley malt, “made on equipment that also processes wheat.”
    Wonka Oompas and the Wonka Bar are NOT gluten-free.
    WONKA
    Sweetarts Gummy Bugs –  contains wheat/gluten
    Sweetarts Rope –  contains wheat/gluten
    Oompas
    Wonka Bar

    Here is a partial list of major candy manufacturers and how to contact them:

    Contact Hershey's at 800-468-1714. Contact Jelly Belly at 800-522-3267. Contact Just Born at 888-645-3453 Contact Mars Chocolate at 800-627-7852. Contact Necco at 781-485-4800. Contact Nestle USA at 800-225-2270. Other resources:
    About.com Surefoodliving.com DivineCaroline.com

    Dr. Vikki Petersen D.C, C.C.N
    This article originally appeared in the Winter 2011 edition of Celiac.com's Journal of Gluten-Sensitivity.
    Celiac.com 05/16/2011 - Nearly 75% of the 24 million Americans suffering from autoimmune disease are women, according to the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA).  Women appear to mount larger inflammatory responses than men when their immune systems are triggered, thereby increasing their risk of autoimmunity.  The fact that sex hormones are involved is indicated by the fact that many autoimmune diseases fluctuate with hormonal changes such as those that occur during pregnancy, during the menstrual cycle, or when using oral contraceptives. A history of pregnancy also appears to increase the risk for autoimmune disease.
    The sex hormone that is commonly low in such women is Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA). This is a natural steroid and is produced by the adrenal glands, the reproductive organs and the brain.  DHEA is used by the body to make the male and female hormones, testosterone and estrogen respectively, and is known to have anti-inflammatory effects. It has been proposed that a DHEA deficiency is a contributing factor in autoimmune diseases.  Last year a study was done to look at precisely that effect.  The study’s conclusions have been supported by other, similar research and I think you’ll find it quite interesting.
    The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism Vol. 94, No. 6 2044-2051(2009) published an article entitled “Low Serum Levels of Sex Steroids Are Associated with Disease Characteristics in Primary Sjogren’s Syndrome; Supplementation with Dehydroepiandrosterone Restores the Concentrations”. The authors investigated whether there was a relationship between steroid levels and the disease characteristics of Sjogren’s.
    They based their study on the known data that DHEA not only declines with aging but is reduced in Sjogren’s, an autoimmune disease. The study was populated by 23 post-menopausal women with primary Sjogren’s syndrome and subnormal levels of DHEA. The investigation was a controlled, double blind crossover study, conducted over a 9 month period, where DHEA was assessed by sophisticated laboratory measurements and typical symptoms of Sjogren’s such as dry mouth and eyes and salivary flow rates were similarly assessed.
    Results revealed a strong correlation between low DHEA and Sjogren’s symptoms.  DHEA and its sex hormone metabolites (testosterone and estrogen) were found to increase with DHEA supplementation but not with the placebo. Symptoms such as dry eyes were seen to improve as estrogen levels
    The researchers concluded that the disease manifestations of primary Sjogren’s syndrome were associated with low sex hormone levels and the supplementation of DHEA allowed the body to transform into androgens, testosterone and estrogen, with testosterone production predominating.
    Please allow me to add some personal interpretation. For the most part I agree with the premise and applaud the results. The facts that autoimmune disease occurs more often in women, that women frequently have low DHEA, and that androgens have anti-inflammatory effects that can benefit autoimmune disease are all true.
    But should we simply give such women DHEA and call it a day? I don’t think so.  I propose that we do three things: First, evaluate hormonal levels in women regularly; Second, address WHY their hormonal levels are imbalanced;  And third, when supplementing with hormones such as DHEA, ensure that the delivery system is one that mimics what the body does naturally.
    Remember that autoimmune disease can begin many years before the first symptoms become manifest. Therefore evaluating hormonal levels in our younger women is a good idea.  When I find DHEA levels that are low, my first order of business is to assess why.  Frequently it is due to a phenomenon known as “pregnenelone steal” that occurs when the adrenal glands are under stress.  It is a common occurrence and one of the fantastic abilities of the human body to shift from one pathway to another when under stress.  The “steal” pathway diverts the body away from making sex hormones and instead it makes more “stress” hormones.  So while adding some DHEA into the mix might very well help, does it make sense to find out WHY it’s being diverted away from making sex hormones?  I hope so because it’s the very foundation of the medicine that we practice—functional medicine.
    Once you understand the root cause of the deficiency you can take steps to truly remedy it rather than simply covering it up by taking DHEA.  Not to keep hitting you over the head with this concept, but supplementing with DHEA as your sole treatment misses the underlying cause since the body is designed to make adequate quantities of DHEA.
    A common reason for the diversion or “steal” pathway to become activated is adrenal stress from poor absorption of nutrients, unstable blood sugar and the presence of infections—all problems we see with the gluten intolerant patient! While I’m not implying that every autoimmune patient has a gluten intolerance, it certainly warrants screening all of them because of its high prevalence.
    As we travel down the road to optimal health through avoiding any food the body isn’t tolerating well, improving the integrity of the small intestine and normalizing adrenal function, there are certainly times when hormonal supplementation is beneficial. I don’t recommend the oral route because the first place the hormone travels is to the liver and this can be burdensome to that organ.  When the body makes hormones naturally it delivers them straight to the bloodstream.  In an effort to mimic that delivery system we use a buccal route (placed between cheek and gum in the mouth) that does a good job in bringing the hormone directly to the bloodstream and bypassing the liver and digestive tract.
    Autoimmune diseases comprise the third leading cause of death in our country and research strongly suggests that its rapid increase is due to environmental factors, especially those that weaken the small intestine. I am committed to earlier diagnosis while the disease is still remediable, as well as overall reduction of incidence through addressing digestive health.
    I hope you find this informative.  Please share this information with those who have autoimmune disease themselves as well as in their family.


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 10/19/2012 - Irish citizens with celiac disease will no longer be reimbursed for the gluten-free products they buy, under to a newly announced cutback to their health benefits.
    The Irish Pharmacy Union (IPU) says that new cuts to health benefits by the Irish health service (HSE) mean that many gluten-free products will no longer be reimbursed by the government, including products purchased by patients with medical cards, and those receiving long-term illness benefits.
    Gluten-free products that will no longer be covered include baking powder, breads, cornflakes, flour, muesli, pasta, pizza and porridge.
    People with celiac disease must eat gluten-free foods to avoid suffering from significant health problems. The IPU says this means that celiac patients, who rely on gluten-free products to maintain their health, will no longer receive financial support to help them cover the cost of these products.
    The HSE announced the controversial €130 million in cuts last spring, but made no mention that gluten-free products would be removed from the list of free items.
    The HSE announcement said only that 'certain products including' glucosamine, the obesity drug Orlistat, and Omega-3 Triglycerides to protect against heart disease, would be removed from the list of reimbursable products.
    In confirming the elimination of reimbursements for gluten-free products, an HSE spokesperson said that the agency was choosing to cut products for which there was 'doubt about their clinical efficacy.'
    What do you think? Are gluten-free products medically questionable for people with celiac disease? Let us know your thoughts by commenting below.
    Source:
    Irish Health

    Sheila Hughes
    Celiac.com 05/29/2013 - Television's the Disney Channel has always been known to be kid friendly and parents approved, but a recent airing has parents viewing this network in a new light.
    "Jessie," a fairly new sitcom, premiered on September 30, 2011. It follows the life of an eighteen year old who nannies for a high profile family of four children. Seemingly harmless, right? In a recent episode titled “Quitting Cold Koala,” Stuart, a gluten-free child, is victimized. Several jokes were made in reference to the character's diet such as, "You call me sweetie again, and you'll be eating some gluten-free knuckles." In another part of the episode another child throws pancakes at Stuart as he screams "gluten!" and wipes his face.
    Those who are diagnosed with celiac disease must live a completely gluten-free life. Gluten is a very common protein which is found in foods made with wheat, rye, and barely. When ingested their immune system literally starts destroying them from the inside out.
    Amy Raslevich, was outraged by the episode in question when she watched it with her two gluten-free children. She was quoted in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette saying, "There were tears in my daughter's eyes, and my son's fist was clenched.” She started her own petition on Change.org asking the Disney Channel to no longer air this episode.
    Disney has made the decision to pull this episode for now, and is currently re-evaluating whether it will be shown again.
    Source:
    http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-204_162-57585388/disney-pulls-jessie-episode-that-makes-fun-of-gluten-free-child/

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/23/2018 - If you’re looking for a great gluten-free Mexican-style favorite that is sure to be a big hit at dinner or at your next potluck, try these green chili enchiladas with roasted cauliflower. The recipe calls for chicken, but they are just as delicious when made vegetarian using just the roasted cauliflower. Either way, these enchiladas will disappear fast. Roasted cauliflower gives these green chili chicken enchiladas a deep, smokey flavor that diners are sure to love.
    Ingredients:
    2 cans gluten-free green chili enchilada sauce (I use Hatch brand) 1 small head cauliflower, roasted and chopped 6 ounces chicken meat, browned ½ cup cotija cheese, crumbled ½ cup queso fresco, diced 1 medium onion, diced ⅓ cup green onions, minced ¼ cup radishes, sliced 1 tablespoon cooking oil 1 cup chopped cabbage, for serving ½ cup sliced cherry or grape tomatoes, for serving ¼ cup cilantro, chopped 1 dozen fresh corn tortillas  ⅔ cup oil, for softening tortillas 1 large avocado, cut into small chunks Note: For a tasty vegetarian version, just omit the chicken, double the roasted cauliflower, and prepare according to directions.
    Directions:
    Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a cast iron or ovenproof pan until hot.
    Add chicken and brown lightly on both sides. 
    Remove chicken to paper towels to cool.
     
    Cut cauliflower into small pieces and place in the oiled pan.
    Roast in oven at 350F until browned on both sides.
    Remove from the oven when tender. 
    Allow roasted cauliflower to cool.
    Chop cauliflower, or break into small pieces and set aside.
    Chop cooled chicken and set aside.
    Heat 1 inch of cooking oil in a small frying pan.
    When oil is hot, use a spatula to submerge a tortilla in the oil and leave only long enough to soften, about 10 seconds or so. 
    Remove soft tortilla to a paper towel and repeat with remaining tortillas.
    Pour enough enchilada sauce to coat the bottom of a large casserole pan.
    Dunk a tortilla into the sauce and cover both sides. Add more sauce as needed.
    Fill each tortilla with bits of chicken, cauliflower, onion, and queso fresco, and roll into shape.
    When pan is full of rolled enchiladas, top with remaining sauce.
    Cook at 350F until sauce bubbles.
    Remove and top with fresh cotija cheese and scallions.
    Serve with rice, beans, and cabbage, and garnish with avocado, cilantro, and sliced grape tomatoes.

     

    Roxanne Bracknell
    Celiac.com 06/22/2018 - The rise of food allergies means that many people are avoiding gluten in recent times. In fact, the number of Americans who have stopped eating gluten has tripled in eight years between 2009 and 2017.
    Whatever your rationale for avoiding gluten, whether its celiac disease, a sensitivity to the protein, or any other reason, it can be really hard to find suitable places to eat out. When you’re on holiday in a new and unknown environment, this can be near impossible. As awareness of celiac disease grows around the world, however, more and more cities are opening their doors to gluten-free lifestyles, none more so than the 10 locations on the list below.
    Perhaps unsurprisingly, the U.S is a hotbed of gluten-free options, with four cities making the top 10, as well as the Hawaiian island of Maui. Chicago, in particular, is a real haven of gluten-free fare, with 240 coeliac-safe eateries throughout this huge city. The super hip city of Portland also ranks highly on this list, with the capital of counterculture rich in gluten-free cuisine, with San Francisco and Denver also included. Outside of the states, several prominent European capitals also rank very highly on the list, including Prague, the picturesque and historic capital of the Czech Republic, which boasts the best-reviewed restaurants on this list.
    The Irish capital of Dublin, meanwhile, has the most gluten-free establishments, with a huge 330 to choose from, while Amsterdam and Barcelona also feature prominently thanks to their variety of top-notch gluten-free fodder.
    Finally, a special mention must go to Auckland, the sole representative of Australasia in this list, with the largest city in New Zealand rounding out the top 10 thanks to its 180 coeliacsafe eateries.
    The full top ten gluten-free cities are shown in the graphic below:
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
    It seems a Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena is hoping that his trendy claim will catch the eye of a buyer hungry to avoid gluten, or, at least one with a sense of humor. D’Elena said he crafted the ads as a way to “be funny and to draw attention.” The idea, D’Elena said, is to “make it memorable.” 
    Though D’Elena’s marketing seeks to capitalizes on the gluten-free trend, he knows Celiac disease is a serious health issue for some people. “[W]e’re not here to offend anybody….this is just something we're just trying to do to draw attention and do what's best for our clients," he said. 
    Still, the signs seem to be working. D'elena had fielded six offers within a few days of listing the west Phoenix home.
    "Buying can sometimes be the most stressful thing you do in your entire life so why not have some fun with it," he said. 
    What do you think? Clever? Funny?
    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

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    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
    The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease.
    USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.”
    Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com.
    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au