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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams
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    Beyond March Madness, More Colleges Featuring Gluten-free Food Lineups

      The March news regarding new gluten-free eateries shows that the most impactful news coming out of US colleges is about more than just basketball.

    Caption: Gluten-free eateries are increasingly popular at US colleges. Photo: CC--Mr. Gray

    Celiac.com 03/29/2017 - The March news regarding new gluten-free eateries shows that the most impactful news coming out of US colleges is about more than just basketball.

    The gluten-free eating scene at US colleges is enjoying a surge of popularity, as more schools are catering to the dietary needs of students with food allergies and sensitivities with dedicated facilities and inspired food offerings.

    With the recent reopening of Risley Dining hall, Cornell University welcomes the second certified gluten-free college eatery in the U.S., following Kent State. After working for two years to remove gluten from their dining hall menu, slowly adding items like rice noodles, gluten-free biscuits and brownies, Cornell's main eatery is now certified 100% gluten-free, peanut free, and tree-nut free.

    University of South Carolina recently debuted not one, but two new campus eateries for students, staff and visitors looking for gluten-free dining. Campus staple, Naturally Woodstock, now offers exclusively gluten-free food options, while Plan-It-Healthy also offers an entirely gluten-free menu.

    Meanwhile, Tulane University's Bruff Commons dining hall debuted a new, dedicated food prep station that serves fresh allergen-free food.

    Called Simple Servings by Sodexo, the allergen-free serving line features two fresh meals twice a day — usually a meat with a vegetable and a gluten-free carbohydrate, said company dietitian Kelsey Rosenbaum.

    The eateries at University of South Carolina and Tulane are working with Sodexo, a quality of life services company to provide gluten-free food services. Sodexo says that Tulane's cafeteria is the first allergen-free fresh food option at a Louisiana university.

    As more and more colleges emulate the success of programs such as these, look for gluten-free, allergen-free options to become the norm, rather than the exception.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/24/2014 - To create a gluten-free, allergen-free station in a dining hall that serves about 10,000 to 14,000 students each week, and offers a different daily menus for each meal, Lehigh University in Bethlehem went the distance. The result was Simple Servings.
    Lehigh's earlier dining hall offered gluten-free cereals, soups, pastas and breads via their Your Choice station. That original station has been incorporated into Simple Servings, and Lehigh students with gluten intolerance can now experience the same range of choices as their non-sensitive counterparts.
    Joseph Kornafel, Lehigh's executive chef, says that the school has really paid attention to details, from getting the right equipment when the station was being built, to maintaining a database of allergen-free recipes,
    Lehigh has also reached out to coaches and student-athletes to make sure they understand how the system works and to always get a clean plate before taking food from the station to avoid cross-contamination.
    Purple is the color adopted to designate allergen-free items in the food industry, and Lehigh uses purple to designate all gluten-free food preparation items, including utensils, carts and cutting boards.
    All gluten-free preparation equipment is dedicated, and never leaves that station to prevent cross-contamination. All chefs working that station are specially trained, and and all ingredients are clearly labeled for each dish.
    Source:
    Lehigh Valley Live

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/13/2015 - Gluten-free students at two elite liberal arts colleges in suburban Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, are now able to enjoy exclusive gluten-free dining areas.
    Both Haverford College and Bryn Mawr College have created dedicated, exclusively gluten-free dining areas for their students with celiac disease or gluten intolerance, according to a report by Campus Reform.
    Bryn Mawr opened their gluten-free dining area in 2013, and Haverford followed in 2014.
    The exclusive eating areas are the brainchild of Bernie Chung-Templeton, executive director of dining services at both schools.
    Each of the gluten-free dining areas has signage clearly warning students to refrain from bringing in food from outside, including the main school cafeteria.
    What do you think? Do students with celiac disease or gluten intolerance deserve dedicated, exclusively gluten-free dining options?
    Read more in Campus Reform.

    Scott Adams
    Kent State Introduces First Gluten-Free Dining Hall on a College Campus
    At the start of the 2016 academic year, Kent State University becomes the first university in the country to feature an entirely gluten-free dining hall on campus. Kent State restructured Prentice Café after administrators noticed that the number of students arriving on campus with gluten intolerance was rising each year. The new dining facility will meet the ever-increasing demand for gluten-free foods.
    An estimated 3 million Americans suffer from celiac disease, a genetic autoimmune disorder that affects the digestive process. When a person who has celiac disease consumes gluten, the individual’s immune system attacks the small intestine and inhibits the body’s ability to absorb important nutrients. Gluten is a protein found in wheat, rye and barley. It is essential for those with celiac disease and sensitivity to gluten to avoid products containing these ingredients. Some individuals who have not been diagnosed with an allergy or sensitivity to gluten also choose to restrict their gluten intake as a personal preference. Until recently, however, it has often been difficult to find suitable gluten-free food options, especially when dining away from home.
    Kent State aims to make college life easier for students who need or prefer gluten-free foods. At Prentice Café, all menu items are gluten-free. Although many campuses offer gluten-free products and some even offer gluten-free stations in their dining halls, Kent State is the first campus to offer an entire dining hall that is certified gluten-free.
    "Students’ needs have always been our top priority," said Rich Roldan, director of university dining services at Kent State. "Students have enough to worry about - they should not havve to worry about their food being safe to eat. It is important they can eat in a safe environment, which is why we decided to make Prentice Café a gluten-free dining location."
    Prentice Café earned certification from the Gluten-Free Food Services Certification Program, a food safety program offered through the Gluten Intolerance Group. The Gluten Intolerance Group is a nonprofit organization dedicated to empowering the gluten-free community through consumer support, advocacy and education.
    Although gluten intolerance has gained attention in recent years, it can still be challenging to address the needs of students who have celiac disease or sensitivity to gluten. One issue is students’ reluctance to self-identify as gluten intolerant. Students are sometimes self-conscious about special dietary needs and often prefer not to feel singled out when dining on campus. This was something administrators considered when developing Prentice Café.
    "It’s important for students who have celiac disease or gluten intolerance to be able to have a safe location where they can go and not have to worry," explained Megan Brzuski, Kent State’s dining services dietitian. "There are many different menu items and options available for students to choose from at Prentice Café."
    Anyone is welcome to dine at Prentice Café, which is open Monday through Thursday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. and on Fridays from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. In addition to every item being gluten-free, the menu also features a variety of vegan and vegetarian dishes, as well as foods that support a healthy lifestyle. The café accepts meal plans, cash and credit cards.
    Prentice Café opened on Aug. 29, the first day of the fall semester. A grand opening celebration will be held on Sept. 7 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Students, faculty, staff and all members of the Kent State community are invited to attend the event, which will include opportunities to sample items, as well as educational displays and prizes.
    The Gluten-Free Food Service Certification Program, a program of the Gluten Intolerance Group, is a proven model of established best practices for food service establishments offering gluten-free options. Certifications and protocols are customized to the specific needs of each food service establishment who works with the Gluten-Free Food Service Certification Program, including considered factors such as facility size, number of locations and the type of food establishment. For more information about the Gluten-Free Food Service Certification program, visit www.gffoodservice.org.
    For more information about Kent State’s Dining Services, visit www.kent.edu/dining.

    Jefferson Adams
    Many College Students Struggle with Gluten-free Diet on Campus
    Celiac.com 01/24/2017 - Coming from homes where gluten-free food is abundant and taken for granted, many college students struggle with maintaining their diets during their time on campus.
    That struggle is the focus of numerous efforts by campuses nationwide to provide solid, reliable and abundant gluten-free food options for their students.
    At a place like SMU, that can include kitchen dining halls that serve gluten-free foods, or gluten-free pantry in Umphrey Lee.
    To help students be more conscious about their food choices SMU posts the daily menus on its website, along with nutritional facts for each item. There are different icons such as Eat Well, Fat Free, Low Sodium, Vegetarian, and Vegan, but as yet, no Gluten-Free icon.
    SMU does offer students access to a campus dietitian, who can help them figure out how to eat a balanced diet on campus, and grant them access to the gluten-free pantry or help in special cases.
    Read more at: smudailycampus.com.

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    There is a site/app called, “Find Me Gluten Free”.  I checked it, but no luck.  Best to bring your own.  I would just bring or buy some other treats.  Save your gluten-free Beignets for when you are at home and they come out of the fryer.  Hot.  Yum.   Personally, I would skip the gluten-free donuts.   I could not find any dedicated gluten-free bakeries in New Orleans.  I would worry about cross contamination where flour in the air is possible.   You should be able to indulge in coffee.  😊
    Researchers from Washington State and Clemson Universities have created a wheat variety safe for those with celiac disease or a gluten intolerance. View the full article
    I've checked out all these places and non of them have gluten-free beignets, maybe just donuts. Thanks for sending.
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