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    Jefferson Adams

    Can Plant Proteins Make Better Gluten-Free Bread?

      Can plant proteins help manufacturers to make better gluten-free bread? Coeliac UK is teaming with Innovate UK to develop three new plant proteins that will improve gluten-free bread.

    Caption: Rapeseed fields. Image: CC--Mathew Bedworth

    Celiac.com 04/02/2019 - Anyone familiar with gluten-free bread knows the downsides. Dry structure, questionable texture, and sometimes inferior taste. Can plant proteins help to change that? Two groups in the UK, Innovate UK and Coeliac UK, are joining forces to develop gluten replacements from UK-grown crops. 

    The Nandi Proteins-led consortium includes Genius Foods, ingredients business AB Mauri, agronomy firm Agrii, Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh. The project will focus on three ingredients currently underused by the food industry: fava beans, rapeseed by-products, and naked oats. As part of that goal, Nandi Proteins will use its proprietary technology to create protein concentrates from the raw materials.

    Nandi holds patents based on the fact that proteins change when they unfold, or denature, Nandi explained in a statement. Properly controlled, the denaturation process can be used to alter and control protein functionality as an ingredient.

    The project is looking to turn lower cost by-products into high value ingredients that can improve the qualities of gluten-free bread. In addition to utilizing natural ingredients that are currently discarded or scarcely used, the project may help gluten-free bread manufacturers to reduce the number of additives in gluten-free breads.

    Once Nandi creates functional proteins, Genius Foods and AB Mauri will begin testing ingredients, and looking to produce better, more commercially viable bread formulas. The goal is better gluten-free bread, and, ideally a better foothold in the gluten-free market for the manufacturers. Success could be a win for consumers looking for better gluten-free breads.

    Efforts Nandi and its partners will help the UK lead the way in industrial production of innovative gluten-free ingredients, Coeliac UK chief executive Sarah Sleet told reporters.

    Read more at FoodNavigator.com

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
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    Over the past few years researchers have been experimenting with sourdough fermentation as a means for making traditional wheat bread safe for people with celiac disease. Recently, yet another study examined the safety of this process with great results.
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    In the meantime, sourdough bread made with gluten-free flours might be the best way for people with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivity to get the benefits of sourdough cultures, and to enjoy fresh, minimally processed bread.
    Of course, not everyone can bake their own sourdough bread. That's why I was happy to learn that more artisanal bread bakers are turning to baking their own delicious gluten-free sourdough to share with others.
    One of these small, artisanal bread makers is a local San Francisco baker named Sadie Scheffer, who runs a company called BreadSRSLY. Sadie bakes delicious long-fermented sourdough bread and other products, using gluten-free grains. She delivers most of her products by bicycle.
    Having sampled Sadie's bread, and I can say that it is some of the best sourdough bread I've tasted, gluten-free or not. It isdelicious, dense, and chewy sourdough bread that is perfect for toasting. The loaves are fermented for twelve hours before baking. Folks in San Francisco can find Sadie's delicious gluten-free sourdough bread at BiRite, Gluten Free Grocery and Other Avenues, and at breadsrsly.com.
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    Here's a recipe for gluten-free sourdough starter.
    Other helpful links:
    Celiacs Can Say Yes To Sourdough Bread Study Finds Wheat-based Sourdough Bread Started with Selected Lactobacilli is Tolerated by Celiac Disease Patients Can Sourdough Fermentation Speed Intestinal Recovery in Celiac Patients at Start of Gluten-free Diet? Sourdough Bread Made from Wheat and Nontoxic Flours and Started with Selected Lactobacilli Is Tolerated in Celiac Sprue Patients The Art of Gluten-Free Sourdough Baking

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/12/2017 - Researchers at Hiroshima University say they have perfected the science behind a new bread-baking recipe. Developed by Japan's National Agriculture and Food Research Organization, NARO, the method uses rice-flour to produce gluten-free bread with a similar consistency and volume to traditional wheat-flour loaves.
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    They dub this supportive matrix "stone walls,” and they apparently form due to the surface activity of the undamaged starch granules. It appears these granules are able to lower the surface tension of water, and reduce the likelihood of collapse in the formed bubble walls. The result is spongier, chewier bread.
    Some of the researchers suspect that the stability of the undamaged starch bubble is due to the uniform hydrophobicity of the similar sized granules, and that these cause an interface between damp gaseous air pockets and the liquid batter. Whatever the exact reason, this "stone wall" matrix allows bubbles to grow and expand as interior CO2 levels increase, which leads to superior bread loaves.
    This technique has the potential to revolutionize the gluten-free bread industry. Stay tuned to see how the story evolves.
    Source:
    Sciencedaily.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/15/2018 - There is a good amount of anecdotal evidence that people with non-celiac gluten sensitivity can tolerate sourdough bread, but there is no good science to support such claims. To determine if sourdough bread help conquer wheat sensitivity, the Alberta Wheat Commission (AWC) is funding a team of researchers to see if the sourdough fermentation process can reduce or eliminate wheat components that trigger wheat sensitivity.
    The project will study the way the sourdough bread fermentation process breaks down proteins and carbohydrates in wheat flour.
    Chair of the AWC Research Committee, Terry Young, said new research suggests that wheat protein may not be the cause of gluten sensitivity in people without celiac disease. Longer fermentation, aka sourdough fermentation, is more common in Europe. Young says that reports indicate that “incidents of non-celiac sensitivity…are actually lower in Europe." He adds the current research will focus on the fermentation, but the future may include the development of wheat varieties for gluten sensitive individuals.
    The research will be led by food microbiologist at the University of Alberta, Dr. Michael Gänzle, who said the use of sourdough bread in industrial baking reduces ingredient costs and can improve the quality of bread as well.
    Dr. Gänzle wants to assess anecdotal claims that people with non-celiac wheat or gluten intolerance can tolerate sourdough bread. His team wants to “determine whether fermentation reduces or eliminates individual wheat components that are known or suspected to cause adverse effects.”
    The team readily admits that their project will not create products that are safe for people with celiac disease. They may, however, create products that are useful for people without celiac disease, but who are gluten sensitivity.
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    Studies like this are important to shed light on the differences between celiac and non-celiac gluten sensitivity. Stay tuned for more developments in this exciting area of research.
    Source:
    highriveronline.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/24/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to investigate the degradation of gluten in rye sourdough products by means of a proline-specific peptidase.
    The research team included Theresa Walter, Herbert Wieser, and Peter Koehler, with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Lebensmittelchemie, Leibniz Institut in Freising, Germany.
    Their team monitored gluten content of rye sourdough during fermentation using competitive ELISA based on the R5 antibody. The team noted a decrease in gluten over time, but found that even prolonged fermentation did not bring gluten levels below 20 ppm requirement for gluten-free foods. 
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    Gluten-free rye flour alone or in combination with sourdough starter was used to produce gluten-free bread, which the team then assessed for its sensory characteristics. 
    Whereas gluten-free sourdough bread lacked any of the favorable qualities of conventional rye bread, the replacement of sourdough by egg proteins yielded gluten-free bread comparable to the conventional rye, and with better qualities than bread made with naturally gluten-free ingredients. 
    This study demonstrates the feasibility of using ANPEP treatment to produce high-quality gluten-free sourdough bread from originally gluten-containing cereals, such as rye. 
    Rye products rendered gluten-free in this manner have the potential to increase the choice of high-quality foods for celiac patients. 
    Source:
    European Food Research and TechnologyMarch 2015, Volume 240, Issue 3, pp 517–524

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