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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    CELIAC DISEASE: A TEENAGER'S PERSPECTIVE


    Alexandra  Rosenberg

    Celiac.com 06/03/2008 - I know—you are a teenager, you go out with your friends, see movies, have fun and unfortunately—have to eat with them sometimes too. I know because I’m also a teenager who is living with celiac disease, so I know what it feels like to have to say “I have an allergy, what can I eat, please try to avoid cross-contamination,” in front of all your friends. It is embarrassing and annoying—at least for me it is, and I am willing to bet that it is to some of you other teens out there too.


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    Miraculously I found a way to cope, and if you are just starting to get the hang of dealing with celiac disease I can tell you that it is not as bad as you think. I remember the first gluten-free pasta I tried. It was the most disgusting thing I had ever tasted. I still can picture my mom saying to me, “Oh, don’t worry I guess you will get used to it.” I thought that the satisfaction of eating a delicious meal would be gone forever. Luckily, I experimented with different products, joined the celiac boards, and learned which mainstream and gluten-free products were best. To my amazement, I actually found foods that I liked—and dare I say maybe some that I even enjoyed more than the “regular” gluten versions.

    The next step was eating out at restaurants. I still get scared when eating out because you really don’t know what they do behind those kitchen doors. Are they touching gluten and then touching your food? Perhaps they are accidentally even putting gluten in your food. The first time I ate out my heart was racing and my head was spinning—I was so nervous that I almost walked out of the restaurant. Fortunately, I spoke with the chef who knew all about the allergy and issues of cross-contamination. I felt confident in the chef. After a nerve wracking but delicious meal I realized that I had not eaten gluten. I also realized that I could eat out, at least once in a while!

    Now, the hardest part, for me anyway, is ordering a gluten free meal when I am with my friends. I usually try to joke around and make light of the situation, while still making sure the waiter knows that I have a serious allergy and the chef needs to be attentive. Usually my friends and everyone else just say that they could never live without pasta and pizza and they don’t mind my long orders. Another tip for ordering out is to simply do like you would do any other time. Tell the waiter your problems, ask to speak to the chef, and pretend like this is any other gluten-free meal. There is no reason to be embarrassed about having to spend a little extra time on your order to make sure that you don’t get sick.

    Yes, the disease is hard to deal with sometimes, but, for the most part it is easy to resist those gluten temptations by remembering what happened the last time you ate those items, and how you will get afterwards. If you are just starting out on a gluten-free diet, be patient and remember that you are not alone. Also, realize that you are special and that celiac disease is just a part of you that you will learn to love and have fun with. Soon, you will realize that it is not so bad after all. I honestly would not give up having this allergy because it is something I have grown to love—I am a proud to be gluten-free!


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    Guest Melinda Ralph

    Posted

    I loved this article! I was 'officially' diagnosed when I was 17, so I know exactly what you're talking about. I, too, remember my first attempts at trying t find gluten-free food (Soooo Gross!). But now I know which ones to get and which to avoid. I definitely have a few gluten-free foods that I like WAY better than the 'regular' versions. Thanks again!

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    Guest Hildegard Savage

    Posted

    Thank you, Alexandra, for writing this article. I especially liked the very last sentence. It must have come straight from your heart. It is the same way I have felt the whole 46 years I have been on the gluten-free diet. I was diagnosed at 38 years of age and am now 86 years old. No wheel chair, no walking all bent over. No serious health problems. Just a little arthritis, and I don't hear so good anymore.

    My best wishes to you, Alexandra, for a wonderful future!

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    Guest Rosalind Q. Spiller

    Posted

    Great article. I'm passing this to my teenage grandkids (none diagnosed yet, but I know they're concerned with their moms and grandmother having to be gluten free). Thanks!

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    Guest Glyndell Houston

    Posted

    Alexandra, Thank you for your encouraging article and positive attitude! You go girl!!

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    Guest Michele Arthur

    Posted

    All three of my teen aged children and I have Celiac disease and I applaud your embracing of the situation. They too have experienced the type of nervousness you describe, especially when going out with friends or going to a friends house for an event. However, they have been quite pleased to find out that most of their friends have accommodated their 'weird' allergy and go out of their way to consider their needs. They also usually pack a snack or two in their backpack or bag 'just in case'. Generally, it's about the getting together, not about the food when you're with friends. Good luck! By the way, my oldest son went away to college and had no problem at all. The cafeteria created gluten-free food that was actually good tasting and other students chose the gluten-free food even though they didn't 'need' to eat gluten-free! Overcoming the fear that others have of the unknown is done one step at a time...rock on!

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    Guest dawn puddester

    Posted

    Thank you for this article. My daughter is a teenager and has been gluten free for 12 years and its so refreshing to hear these words from someone who knows first-hand the challenges of being a gluten free teen. You're very thoughtful. Thanks.

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    Guest Erica

    Posted

    I have two children with celiac disease (age 10 & 17) who were diagnosed in 2000 and 2001. We have experienced all the same issues. Both my boys will throw up with the slightest ingestion of gluten. I think the most important thing we have learned is never stop doing the things everyone else does. My older son went to Quebec City with his school for 4 days when he was in grade 8. He brought a cooler on wheels with extra food and all the restaurants were forewarned about his disease. This spring he went on a 3 day outdoor ed camping trip. His whole group ate gluten free (except for pasta). The boys in his group decided it would be easier if they didn't bring any bread, cereal or bagels. The best part about this was that it wasn't my son's idea...but the groups! I have even watched some of my son's friends stick up for him when kids try offering him something he can't eat. My younger son has lived with this disease for almost his whole life. He used to get sad when he couldn't have some of the food other kids were having....but now he knows and understands how sick that food makes him. Also, growing up gluten free for them has gotten easier and easier over the years. Many restaurants offer gluten-free menus. Leory Selmans in Florida even offers gluten-free beer! We live in Ontario Canada and one of our large pizza chains now offers gluten-free pizza at every store.

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    Guest Erica Lynn

    Posted

    I really enjoyed reading this article. I am 17 years old, and though I have not been officially diagnosed with celiac disease both my GI doctor and I are confident that I am gluten intolerant (as of late fall of 2007). Sadly yes this does makes it difficult to eat out with friends, but I manage to do pretty well at it, and thankfully they are pretty understanding. I think the hardest part for me is going to be at meets and such during cross country and track season. I am actively involved with these two sports and when we travel, I don't have a choice in where we eat. Hopefully I will be able to bring my own food perhaps. Our coach also pushes us to carbo load. Every night before a meet we would chow down on a ton of pasta, breadsticks, etc. I am guessing that this may have contributed to my development of gluten intolerance. I am not sure how everything will work out yet, but I am hopeful. I look forward to reading more articles like this from others my age. I have yet to meet someone who is gluten intolerant or celiac who is about my age. It can be quite lonely at times...

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    Guest Jake Rosenberg

    Posted

    I too know what it is like to live a gluten-free lifestyle. This was a very well-written article, and your inspiring words moved me deeply. This has helped me turn my life around. Thank you.

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    Guest Mrs. DeGeorge

    Posted

    In writing your recommendation, I came across your entry for celiac.com, so I thought I would read your article. I continue to be proud of who you are. Your honesty, humor and sensitivity shines in this article. Thank you for sharing it with me and all of the teens who could benefit from your insight and the responses that followed.

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    Guest Alexandra Isom

    Posted

    Holy cow. I read this and I was like wow that's exactly how I feel haha. I was diagnosed freshmen year of high school on spring break fantastic time eh? Well I also had that whole this is nasty why me I hate this it sucks it will never get better for bout 3 months afterward. I was depressed and angry and just indifferent! Finally people started helping me and now I help people I'm so proud to help but I also still sometimes feel like ugh why me and get down, but I remember when I get older to help many people because I know what it feels like to be 15 (at the time) and have to worry bout everything you do because of a dumb "allergy". Thanks for writing this article I wish actually that someone my age was at my school who had it but so far only me. It would be nice to connect with someone on this level then they really could "know how I feel"!

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    I'm glad that other teens feel the same way that I do! I was diagnosed when I was 13 and now I'm 17. It's been really hard and I've had several trips to the hospital. My mom also has it and so do two of my friends. People sometimes tease me about it and put food in my face that I can't eat. But some of my friends buy me food all the time which is really cool.

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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 09/02/2010 - About a quarter of people who suffer from celiac disease or gluten intolerance spend a decade or more complaining to doctors before receiving an accurate diagnosis, according to a poll conducted by Coeliac UK.
    According to the poll, nearly 25 percent of sufferers consulted doctors about their symptoms for over a decade, while eleven percent of people with celiac disease sought help from doctors for over 20 years before receiving a proper diagnosis.
    People with gluten intolerance and celiac disease often suffer from persistent diarrhea, bloating and abdominal pain that is triggered by the body's immune system fighting gluten as a foreign invader. Women are twice to three times more likely to develop celiac disease than men.
    The poll also revealed that nearly 60 percent of the nearly 1,600 poll respondents had also been mistakenly diagnosed with anaemia, without even a follow-up test. Almost six in 10 were misdiagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome.
    Women being to there times more likely to develop celiac disease than men, coupled with 60 percent general misdiagnosis for irritable bowel syndrome means that women are likely being disproportionately misdiagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome.
    Doctors also commonly misdiagnosed gluten intolerance and celiac disease as anxiety and depression, gastroenteritis, gallstones, ulcers, ME or chronic fatigue syndrome and appendicitis. Many patients reported being accused of being hypochondriacs.
    Not surprisingly perhaps, one in three respondents rated their GP's knowledge about the disease as poor or very poor.
    Coeliac UK's CEO Sarah Sleet said guidelines from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (Nice) should be pushing up rates for celiac diagnosis.
    'But with around 500,000 people currently undiagnosed in the UK there is still a long way to go and it will be another 30 years at the current rate of progress before we crack the problem,' she said.
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    Why do people with gluten intolerance and celiac disease have to wait ten or twenty years or more to get properly diagnosed?
    How long did you have to wait? How did your doctor do with diagnosis? Slow diagnosis? Misdiagnosis? Tell us and we'll be sure to include some of your responses in a follow-up article.
    Source:

    The Daily Mail

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 10/11/2010 - Halloween is upon us again, and for parents of children who must avoid gluten, a simple walk down the store candy aisle can present a daunting challenge: How to know with certainty which candies, especially seasonal candies, are safe for kids on a gluten-free diet?
    The good news this year is that awareness of gluten-sensitivity and gluten-free issues is on the rise, and more parents are demanding gluten-free candy choices. Also, more manufacturers are now identifying their candies as gluten-free, giving parents and trick-or-treaters a wider range of choices.
    It's easy to find gluten-free specialty candies from a reliable source. But, since more mainstream treats are common on Halloween night, it's helpful to know which ones are safe.
    Below you will find the latest gluten-friendly and gluten-free lists of candies which were current as of the date of this article. Below that you will also find a list of unsafe, NON-gluten-free candies, and a partial list of manufacturers with links to their websites. Remember, the list is meant to be used as a gauge, and is not meant to be authoritative or comprehensive. Adjust your vigilance according to your own sensitivity levels, or those of your children.
    Gluten-friendly and Gluten-Free (Safe) Candy and Treats for Halloween

    3 Musketeers fun size
    3 Musketeers Mint with dark chocolateA
    Act II Popcorn Balls
    Albert’s Gummy Eyeballs
    Albert’s Iced Halloween pops (lollipops)
    Almond Joy fun size bars
    Amanda's Own Confections Chocolate shapes and chocolate lollipops
    Annie's Organic Bunny Fruit Snacks
    Applehead, Grapehead, Cherryhead,
    B
    Baby Ruth
    Bazooka Big Mix (includes bubble gum, bubble gum filled candy, candy chews, and bubble gum filled lollipops)
    Betty Crocker Fruit by the Foot Wicked Webs Berry Wave mini feet
    Betty Crocker Halloween fruit flavored snacks – “Gluten Free”
    Bit•O•Honey
    Butterfinger fun size
    Big Blow bubblegum
    Black Forest Gummy Tarantulas
    Black Forest Gummy Fun Bugs Juicy Oozers
    Bubbly lollipop + gum
    C
    Candy Checkers (made for Target)
    Caramel Apple Pops (lollipops made by Tootsie Roll)
    Charleston Chew fun size
    Charms Blow Pops
    Charms Candy Carnival Package (Blow Pops, Sugar Babies, Zip a Dee mini pops, Sugar Daddy, Pops, Sugar Mama Caramel, Tear Jerkers sour bubble gum, Blow Pop Bubble Gum)
    Charms Fluffy Stuff Spider Web cotton candy
    Chewy Atomic Fireballs
    Chewy Lemonheads and Friends
    Child’s Play
    Colombina Scary Eyeballs bubblegum
    Colombina Fizzy Pops
    Comix Mix Candy Sticks (Tom and Jerry, Flintstones, Scooby Doo, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Popeye) – “Gluten Free”
    Cracker Jack caramel coated popcorn and peanuts
    Disney Halloween Candy Mix (jelly beans, gummies, candy bracelets and candy characters from Cars, Tinkerbell and Toy Story)
    Dove pieces (Dark Chocolate, Milk Chocolate, Peanut Butter Milk Chocolate, Caramel Milk Chocolate)
    D
    Dots Gumdrops – including Candy Corn Dots (candy corn flavored), Ghost Dots (assorted fruit flavored), and Bat Dots (blood orange flavored)
    Dubble Bubble bubblegum
    Dum Dum Lollipops (including Shrek Pops) – “This product does not contain peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, wheat or gluten. It has been manufactured on dedicated equipment.”
    Dum Dum Chewy Pops – “This product does not contain peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, wheat or gluten. It has been manufactured on dedicated equipment.”
    F
    Farley’s Kiddie Mix (includes Smarties, SweetTarts, Now and Later, Jaw Breakers, Super Bubble and Lolli-pops)
    Ferrara Pan Caramels
    Ferrara Pan Lemonhead & Friends candy mix (includes Applehead, Cherryhead, Grapehead, Chewy Lemonhead & Friends, Chewy Atomic Fireball, and Red Hots)
    Florida’s Natural Healthy Treats Nuggets, Sour String, Fruit Stiks – “Gluten Free”
    Fright Fingers Popcorn Kit
    Frankford’s Bugs Gummy Candy
    Frankford’s Gummy Body Parts
    Frankford’s Marshmallow Pals
    Fun Dip
    Fun Dip Sour
    G
    Game Night boxes of candy game pieces (includes Operation, Sorry!, Monopoly, Life, and Clue)
    Grave Gummies (Yummy Gummies)
    Gummy Pirate Choppers
    H
    Heath milk chocolate English toffee bar snack size
    Hershey’s Kisses - Milk Chocolate Only!!
    Hershey’s Milk Chocolate snack size bars (1.55 ounce)
    Hershey’s Milk Chocolate with Almonds snack size bars
    Hot Tamales – “Gluten Free”
    Humphrey Popcorn Balls
    J
    Jelly Belly beans are gluten-free and dairy-free
    Jolly Rancher hard candy and Doubles Candy
    Jolly Rancher lollipops and sticks
    Jr. Mints fun size
    Jujyfruits
    Just Born marshmallow treats
    K
    Kellogg’s Spongebob Squarepants fruit flavored snacks
    Kraft Jet-Puffed Boo Mallows marshmallows
    L
    Lemonheads
    LiveSavers Gummies
    M
    M&M’s – original, peanut, peanut butter
    Mars M&M's (all EXCEPT Pretzel M&M's)
    Mars Dove chocolate products (all)
    Mars Munch Nut bar
    Mars Snickers & Snickers Dark bars
    Mallo Cup
    Marvel Heroes Candy Sticks (Hulk, Spiderman, Wolverine) – “Gluten Free.”
    Melster Peanut Butter Kisses
    Milk Duds
    Mike and Ike – “Gluten Free”
    Mini Mentos
    Mini Sour Dudes Straws
    Monstaz Pops (jack-o-lantern lollipops)
    Monster Hunt plastic monster eggs filled with candy bones, skulls and pumpkins (made for Target)
    Mounds dark chocolate fun size bars
    Mr. Goodbar
    N
    Necco’s Sky Bar 4 in 1 chocolate bar
    Necco Wafers
    Necco Mary Janes
    Necco Mary Jane Peanut Butter Kisses
    Necco Sweethearts Conversation Hearts (available for Valentine's Day only)
    Necco Canada Mint & Wintergreen Lozenges
    Necco Haviland Thin Mints and Candy Stix
    Necco Clark Bars
    Necco Skybars
    Necco Haviland Peppermint & Wintergreen Patties
    Necco Candy Eggs
    Necco Talking Pumpkins (available at Halloween only)
    Necco Squirrel Nut Caramels and Squirrel Nut Zippers
    Necco Banana Split and Mint Julep Chews
    Necco Ultramints
    Nestle Milk Chocolate fun size bars
    Nestle Baby Ruth
    Nestle Bit-O-Honey
    Nestle Butterfinger (but NOT the Butterfinger Crisp or the Butterfinger Stixx)
    Nestle Goobers
    Nestle Nips (both regular and sugar-free)
    Nestle Oh Henry!
    Nestle Raisinets and Sno-Caps
    Nestle Wonka Pixy Stix
    Nestle Wonka Laffy Taffy
    Nestle Wonka Lik-M-Aid Fun Dip
    Nestle Wonka Spree
    O
    Operation Gummy Candy
    P
    Palmer Peanut Butter Cups
    Pay Day peanut caramel bar snack size
    Peanut M&M’s
    Pearson’s Bun candy -  maple and roasted peanuts
    Peeps Jack-o-lanterns, Ghosts and Chocolate Mousse Cats – “Gluten Free”
    Pez candy – “Gluten Free”
    Pop Rocks
    Pixie Stix
    R
    Rain•Blo Bubble Gum Eyes of Terror
    Raisinets
    Red Hots
    Reese’s Fast Break candy bars and snack size
    Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups snack size and miniatures
    Reese’s Peanut Butter Pumpkins
    Reese’s Pieces
    Reese’s Select Peanut Butter Cremes
    Reese’s Select Clusters
    Reese’s Whipps
    Rolo chocolate covered caramels
    S
    Sixlets
    Skeleton Pops (lollipops)
    Skittles fun size – “Gluten Free”
    Skittles Crazy Cores fun size – “Gluten Free”
    Skittles Sour fun size – “Gluten Free”
    Smarties – the small pastel-colored candies sold in rolls, not Nestle’s chocolate version) – “Contains none of the following: gluten (from wheat, barley, oats and rye), milk, egg, fish, crustacean shellfish, tree nuts, wheat, peanuts, or soy beans.”
    Snickers
    Snickers Fudge bar
    Sour Patch
    Starburst Fruit Chews fun size – “Gluten Free”
    Starburst Gummibursts and Sour Gummibursts – “Gluten Free”
    Sugar Babies
    Sugar Daddy Caramel Pops
    Super Bubble bubble gum
    Swedish Fish treat size
    Sweethearts conversation hearts Forbidden Fruits (candy packaging of The Twilight Saga, New Moon the movie)
    Sweet’s Candy Corn Taffy – “This product is Gluten Free”
    T
    Tootsie Pops (original and miniatures)
    Tootsie Rolls midgies and snack bars
    Transformers Candy Mix – gummy shields, fruit chews, candy shields, gum rocks
    W
    Warheads – Extreme Sour hard candy and Sour QBZ chewy cubes
    Wonka Bottlecaps
    Wonka Chocolate Laffy Taffy
    Wonka Giant Chewy Nerds Jelly Beans
    Wonka Giant Pixy Stix
    Wonka Gobstopper Everlasting
    Wonka Gobstopper Chewy
    Wonka Laffy Taffy Ropes
    Wonka Mix-Ups
    Wonka Monster Mix-Ups – SweetTarts Skulls and Bones, Spooky Nerds, Howlin’ Laffy Taffy
    Wonka Nerds – carry a cross contamination warning on the Spooky Nerds orange and fruit punch flavors
    Wonka Pixy Stix
    Wonka Runts
    Wonka Runts Chewy
    Wonka SweetTarts
    Wonka Sweetarts (regular)
    Wonka Sweetarts Chew
    Wonka Sweetarts Giant Chewy
    Wonka Sweetarts Mini Chew
    Wonka Sweetarts Chewy Twists
    Wonka Sweetarts Shockers
    Wonka Tart N Tinys,
    Wonka Tart N Tinys Chew
    Wonka SweetTarts Boo Bag Mix (SweetTart Chews were OK, but other packages in the bag were labeled with a cross-contamination warning. See list below.)
    X
    X-scream Mouth Morphers Fruit Gushers – “Gluten Free”
    Y
    York Peppermint Patties Pumpkins
    Z
    Zed Candy Skulls and Bones (fruit flavored hard candy)


    With all these selections, finding some good, gluten-free candy should be a snap. As always, be sure to read labels, as some ingredients can vary.
    **WARNING! THESE UNSAFE CANDIES CONTAIN GLUTEN:
    AIRHEADS
    Airheads Xtremes Rolls contains wheat flourANNABELLE’S
    Rocky Road – contains barley malt and wheat flour
    BRACH'S
    All Brach's candy should be considered NOT gluten-free
    HERSHEY
    Kit Kat – contains wheat
    Twizzlers – contains wheat
    Whoppers –  contains barley malt and wheat flour
    MARS and WRIGLEY
    Milky Way –  contains barley malt
    Twix –  contains wheat
    NESTLE
    Butterfinger Crisp –  contains wheat flour
    Crunch –  contains barley malt, “made on equipment that also processes wheat.”
    Wonka Oompas and the Wonka Bar are NOT gluten-free.
    WONKA
    Sweetarts Gummy Bugs –  contains wheat/gluten
    Sweetarts Rope –  contains wheat/gluten
    Oompas
    Wonka Bar

    Here is a partial list of major candy manufacturers and how to contact them:

    Contact Hershey's at 800-468-1714. Contact Jelly Belly at 800-522-3267. Contact Just Born at 888-645-3453 Contact Mars Chocolate at 800-627-7852. Contact Necco at 781-485-4800. Contact Nestle USA at 800-225-2270. Other resources:
    About.com Surefoodliving.com DivineCaroline.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 11/21/2013 - Gluten-free food manufacturer Against the Grain, of Brattelboro Vermont, has filed a trademark infringement lawsuit against a California company doing business as Against All Grain.
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    In the court documents, attorneys for Against The Grain assert that the defendants are using a website and Facebook page and have published a cookbook of gluten-free recipes using their "Against All Grain" marks.
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    Sound complicated? It is, a bit, and not just for the similarity of names. Want to read a detailed account?
    Check out this excellent article by Bob Audette for the Brattleboro Reformer, which does a great job of laying out the legal zigs and zags of this particular gluten-free name battle.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 11/27/2014 - A growing desire to avoid gluten is changing the food industry in myriad ways, so says an article in the Oct 25th 2014 edition of the Economist.
    The article points to a fast rising consumer demand for gluten-free products that began with sufferers of celiac disease, but has quickly grown to include large numbers of health conscious eaters, and which shows no sign of slowing down.
    They cite a recent survey by market research firm Mintel, which says sales of gluten-free food and drink in the U.S. have surged from $5.4 billion to $8.8 billion since 2012, and are set to grow a further 20% by 2015.
    They note that Mintel forecasts a 61% growth in gluten-free food sales in America by 2017, with similar increases expected in other rich countries, and they also point to double-digit sales growth of gluten-free products in most European countries--with Britain leading the way.
    Basically, gluten-free food is a strong enough influence on businesses that it is changing the offerings at food markets and eating establishments across the board.
    Grocers are giving precious shelf space, and restaurants are shifting their menus to incorporate gluten-free offerings. It was recently reported that more than half of restaurants in the U.S. will include gluten-free items on this menus by the end of 2014.
    And, as the Economist notes, Europe is following suit. “Even small convenience stores in remote parts of rural Ireland and Italy now stock ranges of gluten-free bread and cakes,” the magazine points out. The big losers here, in terms of market share are other specialty products, such as vegetarian and meat replacement products, whose sales have fallen flat.
    Interestingly, the trend is being ruled not by fad dieters, but largely by people worried about their health. The Economist points to a survey by the research firm Kantar, which found that only about 1 in 5 people who buy gluten-free food say they buy it for non-medical reasons.
    Read the complete article in The Economist.

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/26/2018 - Emily Dickson is one of Canada’s top athletes. As a world-class competitor in the biathlon, the event that combines cross-country skiing with shooting marksmanship, Emily Dickson was familiar with a demanding routine of training and competition. After discovering she had celiac disease, Dickson is using her diagnosis and gluten-free diet a fuel to help her get her mojo back.
    Just a few years ago, Dickson dominated her peers nationally and won a gold medal at Canada Games for both pursuit and team relay. She also won silver in the sprint and bronze in the individual race. But just as she was set to reach her peak, Dickson found herself in an agonizing battle. She was suffering a mysterious loss of strength and endurance, which itself caused huge anxiety for Dickson. As a result of these physical and mental pressures, Dickson slipped from her perch as one of Canada's most promising young biathletes.
    Eventually, in September 2016, she was diagnosed with celiac disease. Before the diagnosis, Dickson said, she had “a lot of fatigue, I just felt tired in training all the time and I wasn't responding to my training and I wasn't recovering well and I had a few things going on, but nothing that pointed to celiac.”
    It took a little over a year for Dickson to eliminate gluten, and begin to heal her body. She still hasn’t fully recovered, which makes competing more of a challenge, but, she says improving steadily, and expects to be fully recovered in the next few months. Dickson’s diagnosis was prompted when her older sister Kate tested positive for celiac, which carries a hereditary component. "Once we figured out it was celiac and we looked at all the symptoms it all made sense,” said Dickson.
    Dickson’s own positive test proved to be both a revelation and a catalyst for her own goals as an athlete. Armed with there new diagnosis, a gluten-free diet, and a body that is steadily healing, Dickson is looking to reap the benefits of improved strength, recovery and endurance to ramp up her training and competition results.
    Keep your eyes open for the 20-year-old native of Burns Lake, British Columbia. Next season, she will be competing internationally, making a big jump to the senior ranks, and hopefully a regular next on the IBU Cup tour.
    Read more at princegeorgecitizen.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/25/2018 - A team of Yale University researchers discovered that bacteria in the small intestine can travel to other organs and trigger an autoimmune response. In this case, they looked at Enterococcus gallinarum, which can travel beyond the gut to the spleen, lymph nodes, and liver. The research could be helpful for treating type 1 diabetes, lupus, and celiac disease.
    In autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, lupus, and celiac disease, the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks healthy cells and tissues. Autoimmune disease affects nearly 24 million people in the United States. 
    In their study, a team of Yale University researchers discovered that bacteria in the small intestine can travel to other organs and trigger an autoimmune response. In this case, they looked at Enterococcus gallinarum, which can travel beyond the gut to the spleen, lymph nodes, and liver. They found that E. gallinarum triggered an autoimmune response in the mice when it traveled beyond the gut.
    They also found that the response can be countered by using antibiotics or vaccines to suppress the autoimmune reaction and prevent the bacterium from growing. The researchers were able to duplicate this mechanism using cultured human liver cells, and they also found the bacteria E. gallinarum in the livers of people with autoimmune disease.
    The team found that administering an antibiotic or vaccine to target E. gallinarum suppressed the autoimmune reaction in the mice and prevented the bacterium from growing. "When we blocked the pathway leading to inflammation," says senior study author Martin Kriegel, "we could reverse the effect of this bug on autoimmunity."
    Team research team plans to further investigate the biological mechanisms that are associated with E. gallinarum, along with the potential implications for systemic lupus and autoimmune liver disease.
    This study indicates that gut bacteria may be the key to treating chronic autoimmune conditions such as systemic lupus and autoimmune liver disease. Numerous autoimmune conditions have been linked to gut bacteria.
    Read the full study in Science.

    Tammy Rhodes
    Celiac.com 04/24/2018 - Did you know in 2017 alone, the United States had OVER TENS OF THOUSANDS of people evacuate their homes due to natural disasters such as fires, floods, hurricanes, tornadoes and tsunamis? Most evacuation sites are not equipped to feed your family the safe gluten free foods that are required to stay healthy.  Are you prepared in case of an emergency? Do you have your Gluten Free Emergency Food Bag ready to grab and go?  
    I have already lived through two natural disasters. Neither of which I ever want to experience again, but they taught me a very valuable lesson, which is why I created a Gluten Free Emergency Food Bag (see link below). Here’s my story. If you’ve ever lived in or visited the Los Angeles area, you’re probably familiar with the Santa Ana winds and how bitter sweet they are. Sweet for cleaning the air and leaving the skies a brilliant crystal blue, and bitter for the power outages and potential brush fires that might ensue.  It was one of those bitter nights where the Santa Ana winds were howling, and we had subsequently lost our power. We had to drive over an hour just to find a restaurant so we could eat dinner. I remember vividly seeing the glow of a brush fire on the upper hillside of the San Gabriel Mountains, a good distance from our neighborhood. I really didn’t think much of it, given that it seemed so far from where we lived, and I was hungry! After we ate, we headed back home to a very dark house and called it a night. 
    That’s where the story takes a dangerous turn….about 3:15am. I awoke to the TV blaring loudly, along with the lights shining brightly. Our power was back on! I proceeded to walk throughout the house turning everything off at exactly the same time our neighbor, who was told to evacuate our street, saw me through our window, assuming I knew that our hillside was ablaze with flames. Flames that were shooting 50 feet into the air. I went back to bed and fell fast asleep. The fire department was assured we had left because our house was dark and quiet again. Two hours had passed.  I suddenly awoke to screams coming from a family member yelling, “fire, fire, fire”! Flames were shooting straight up into the sky, just blocks from our house. We lived on a private drive with only one way in and one way out.  The entrance to our street was full of smoke and the fire fighters were doing their best to save our neighbors homes. We literally had enough time to grab our dogs, pile into the car, and speed to safety. As we were coming down our street, fire trucks passed us with sirens blaring, and I wondered if I would ever see my house and our possessions ever again. Where do we go? Who do we turn to? Are shelters a safe option? 
    When our daughter was almost three years old, we left the West Coast and relocated to Northern Illinois. A place where severe weather is a common occurrence. Since the age of two, I noticed that my daughter appeared gaunt, had an incredibly distended belly, along with gas, stomach pain, low weight, slow growth, unusual looking stool, and a dislike for pizza, hotdog buns, crackers, Toast, etc. The phone call from our doctor overwhelmed me.  She was diagnosed with Celiac Disease. I broke down into tears sobbing. What am I going to feed my child? Gluten is everywhere.
    After being scoped at Children's Hospital of Chicago, and my daughters Celiac Disease officially confirmed, I worried about her getting all the nutrients her under nourished body so desperately needed. I already knew she had a peanut allergy from blood tests, but just assumed she would be safe with other nuts. I was so horribly wrong. After feeding her a small bite of a pistachio, which she immediately spit out, nuts would become her enemy. Her anaphylactic reaction came within minutes of taking a bite of that pistachio. She was complaining of horrible stomach cramps when the vomiting set in. She then went limp and starting welting. We called 911.
    Now we never leave home without our Epipens and our gluten free food supplies. We analyze every food label. We are hyper vigilant about cross contamination. We are constantly looking for welts and praying for no stomach pain. We are always prepared and on guard. It's just what we do now. Anything to protect our child, our love...like so many other parents out there have to do every moment of ever day!  
    Then, my second brush with a natural disaster happened, without any notice, leaving us once again scrambling to find a safe place to shelter. It was a warm and muggy summer morning, and my husband was away on a business trip leaving my young daughter and me to enjoy our summer day. Our Severe Weather Alert Radio was going off, again, as I continued getting our daughter ready for gymnastics.  Having gotten used to the (what seemed to be daily) “Severe Thunderstorm warning,” I didn’t pay much attention to it. I continued downstairs with my daughter and our dog, when I caught a glimpse out the window of an incredibly black looking cloud. By the time I got downstairs, I saw the cover to our grill literally shoot straight up into the air. Because we didn’t have a fenced in yard, I quickly ran outside and chased the cover, when subsequently, I saw my neighbor’s lawn furniture blow pass me. I quickly realized I made a big mistake going outside. As I ran back inside, I heard debris hitting the front of our home.  Our dog was the first one to the basement door! As we sat huddled in the dark corner of our basement, I was once again thinking where are we going to go if our house is destroyed. I was not prepared, and I should have been. I should have learned my lesson the first time. Once the storm passed, we quickly realized we were without power and most of our trees were destroyed. We were lucky that our house had minimal damage, but that wasn’t true for most of the area surrounding us.  We were without power for five days. We lost most of our food - our gluten free food.
    That is when I knew we had to be prepared. No more winging it. We couldn’t take a chance like that ever again. We were “lucky” one too many times. We were very fortunate that we did not lose our home to the Los Angeles wildfire, and only had minimal damage from the severe storm which hit our home in Illinois.
      
    In 2017 alone, FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) had 137 natural disasters declared within the United States. According to FEMA, around 50% of the United States population isn’t prepared for a natural disaster. These disasters can happen anywhere, anytime and some without notice. It’s hard enough being a parent, let alone being a parent of a gluten free family member. Now, add a natural disaster on top of that. Are you prepared?
    You can find my Gluten Free Emergency Food Bags and other useful products at www.allergynavigator.com.  

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/23/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to learn whether celiac disease patients commonly suffer cognitive impairment at the time they are diagnosed, and to compare their cognitive performance with non-celiac subjects with similar chronic symptoms and to a group of healthy control subjects.
    The research team included G Longarini, P Richly, MP Temprano, AF Costa, H Vázquez, ML Moreno, S Niveloni, P López, E Smecuol, R Mazure, A González, E Mauriño, and JC Bai. They are variously associated with the Small Bowel Section, Department of Medicine, Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital; Neurocience Cognitive and Traslational Institute (INECO), Favaloro Fundation, CONICET, Buenos Aires; the Brain Health Center (CESAL), Quilmes, Argentina; the Research Council, MSAL, CABA; and with the Research Institute, School of Medicine, Universidad del Salvador.
    The team enrolled fifty adults with symptoms and indications of celiac disease in a prospective cohort without regard to the final diagnosis.  At baseline, all individuals underwent cognitive functional and psychological evaluation. The team then compared celiac disease patients with subjects without celiac disease, and with healthy controls matched by sex, age, and education.
    Celiac disease patients had similar cognitive performance and anxiety, but no significant differences in depression scores compared with disease controls.
    A total of thirty-three subjects were diagnosed with celiac disease. Compared with the 26 healthy control subjects, the 17 celiac disease subjects, and the 17 disease control subjects, who mostly had irritable bowel syndrome, showed impaired cognitive performance (P=0.02 and P=0.04, respectively), functional impairment (P<0.01), and higher depression (P<0.01). 
    From their data, the team noted that any abnormal cognitive functions they saw in adults with newly diagnosed celiac disease did not seem not to be a result of the disease itself. 
    Their results indicate that cognitive dysfunction in celiac patients could be related to long-term symptoms from chronic disease, in general.
    Source:
    J Clin Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 1. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0000000000001018.

    Connie Sarros
    Celiac.com 04/21/2018 - Dear Friends and Readers,
    I have been writing articles for Scott Adams since the 2002 Summer Issue of the Scott-Free Press. The Scott-Free Press evolved into the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. I felt honored when Scott asked me ten years ago to contribute to his quarterly journal and it's been a privilege to write articles for his publication ever since.
    Due to personal health reasons and restrictions, I find that I need to retire. My husband and I can no longer travel the country speaking at conferences and to support groups (which we dearly loved to do) nor can I commit to writing more books, articles, or menus. Consequently, I will no longer be contributing articles to the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. 
    My following books will still be available at Amazon.com:
    Gluten-free Cooking for Dummies Student's Vegetarian Cookbook for Dummies Wheat-free Gluten-free Dessert Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Reduced Calorie Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Cookbook for Kids and Busy Adults (revised version) My first book was published in 1996. My journey since then has been incredible. I have met so many in the celiac community and I feel blessed to be able to call you friends. Many of you have told me that I helped to change your life – let me assure you that your kind words, your phone calls, your thoughtful notes, and your feedback throughout the years have had a vital impact on my life, too. Thank you for all of your support through these years.