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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/07/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    CELIACS FEEL EXCLUDED FROM SOCIAL LIFE


    Courtney Buchanan

    Celiac.com 01/21/2013 - At the end of a long day of class and meetings, Morgan Hembarsky loved to come home to her four roommates eagerly awaiting her to cook their weekly meal together. Immediately when she walked through the door the most important thing to talk about was food, conversation could wait. Was it pasta with marinara and veggies or chicken Parmesan with warm rolls night? "We try to have dinner together at least once a week to catch up," said Hembarsky, a senior at Lehigh University.


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    The women sat down to a warm meal together and gossiped about their Lehigh University professors' bad jokes and the new romantic comedy in nearby Lehigh Valley theaters. Photo: CC--b_lumenkraftCooking and chatting: a girl's perfect way to unwind at the end of the day. But days of cooking with her roommates are gone. Early in the fall of 2011 after months of stomach pain, Hembarsky visited a doctor and received the answer to her suffering.

    The culprit, celiac disease, which is a condition in which one's body cannot digest gluten and eating it damages the small intestine. Because many of the foods Hembarsky and her friends often used to make contained gluten, like pasta and bread, that meant no more pasta nights with her friends. In October 2011 she gave up foods with gluten, the killer protein found in many grains and flours. Being diagnosed with celiac forced a change to the social calendar. "It's something you learn to live with and you learn what healthy decision you need to make," said Hembarsky. Hembarsky is not alone. For many celiacs in Bethlehem, social opportunities are hindered by dietary restrictions such as not being able to eat a hamburger bun or drink beer at a tailgate because they have gluten. Instead of going out with friends, they cook individualized meals at home. Now with more people being diagnosed as gluten-intolerant or celiac – in fact one out of 133 people in the United States is affected by celiac disease, according to the celiac disease Foundation – the choices of where to buy groceries and whether one should go to a restaurant taking the chance of feeling like a burden are at the forefront of people's minds.

    Take Tabitha Echavarria, a senior at Lehigh University, who was diagnosed with celiac last July 1. "The biggest change in my life has been taking charge of my diet," said Echavarria. "I know 100 percent of the ingredients of everything I eat because I most likely made it from scratch. I never eat anything without asking what is in it. " Echavarria said senior year of high school she experienced persistent migraines, numb feet, chest pain and stomach aches – symptoms that other celiacs often suffer as well. After constantly changing her diet hoping to find the trigger to the pain and receiving negative blood tests, she visited every doctor she could find. "The previous year I had cut out bread from my diet ‘cause I knew something was wrong," said Echavarria. "Then eventually I just really couldn't eat ever and went to like every different doctor available to figure it out. " Now on a Friday night when her rugby teammates go out to hibachi or Sal's starving for a delicious meal, Echavarria makes herself dinner beforehand so she can still tag along to the restaurant. Going to meals with friends is no longer about the eating, it's about the company. While Echavarria still goes out to restaurants for the social aspect, other celiacs avoid eating out as much as possible.

    Three weeks ago, Andrew Bench was sitting at his desk at King, Spry, Herman, Freund & Faul Law Firm in Bethlehem, Pa. , with a stomach ache when he decided to stop eating out as much as possible because of the potential cross contamination. He said many restaurants in the Lehigh Valley have cross contamination even though the waiters told him that the kitchens were being careful. Flash back to when he was diagnosed as celiac a year ago. He described the feeling as a concussion mixed with sinus pressure. Cross contamination could result in the same thing, or worse. Bench recommends Tapas on Main on North Side as a safe gluten-free option. Echavarria likes Red Robin for their protein-style burgers and La Lupita for the corn-based options while Hembarsky prefers salads at Bravo and sushi at Asian Bistro.

    While restaurants are introducing gluten-free menus, Bench said that one slip-up in the kitchen can mean hours of stomach pain. Echavarria recalled getting sick after ordering eggs, a naturally gluten-free dish, at a restaurant. Later she found out that the eggs had pancake batter in them. Restaurants may not think about the danger to celiacs by adding gluten to a naturally gluten-free food. "I think what I am most looking forward to in the future is restaurant activism," said Echavarria. "I would just like to have the option of eating with my friends knowing I'm not going to get sick or that I'm not annoying the people that work there. "The Lehigh Valley is embracing the gluten-free movement, slowly but surely.

    Wegmans, Giant Food and ShopRite have gluten-free aisles that provide a wide range of options. As he was giving granola samples at Wegmans, Calvin Virgillo, operations and sales at The Granola Factory, recognized a need for gluten-free, nut-free granola, which will be available in 2013. "It doesn't matter how good our granolas if there are people who won't buy it because they're gluten free or have a nut allergy," said Virgillo. With increasing options of places to purchase groceries and dine out, the community is recognizing the gap for this niche market of gluten-free consumers. A day will come when gluten-free diners won't have to worry about missing out on social life because of their diets. Until then, Hembarsky must deal with biting into a dry, hard piece of bread and baking her own treats when she wants to socialize with her roommates. "I think bread is the hardest to be gluten-free because it [the gluten-free version] doesn't taste like bread, but a majority of them aren't that great and they come frozen," said Hembarsky. "But everything else, I feel like you don't have to sacrifice at all. "


    Image Caption: Photo: CC--b_lumenkraft
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    I have to completely agree with this article. My daughter was diagnosed at age 11. Her middle school years suddenly became very tough for her. By the start of her freshman year, she was begging to be home schooled. She now has a social anxiety and doesn't care to leave the house. She accepts that she is different, but she fears others perceiving her as being different. Attending parties is no longer the same. She can't have the pizza, cookies, cakes or cupcakes. Eating out has completely changed for our family because we can only frequent restaurants that can accommodate her dietary needs.

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    I agree with most of the article except, perhaps she needs to try some different gluten-free breads. They don't have to be hard and dry - Udi's or Kinnikinnick soft for instance.

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    Guest James Hill

    Posted

    I was diagnosed with coeliac disease in 2000 and fortunately the United Kingdom has good food labeling information. I don't know how many "Wegman" stores there are in the US but they do sell gluten-free pasta and I can get gluten-free beer in the UK! I live in a family where I am a coeliac, my daughter has autism, which limits what she eats. My wife has no restrictions but the solution is to eat more rice or cook a separate gluten-free pasta for me. I miss proper bread and biscuits !

     

     

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    This is comforting to know, especially that Wegman's has made tremendous effort to make sure the products they label are indeed gluten-free. Shoprite, not so, in my opinion... in NJ. I've eaten products they listed as gluten-free and had reactions. It's been a horror story since. But dining out is something that our family do together ALL the time. Me, not so much because I HATE being "the one" with the problem... the inconvenience. Some people go as far as to say "I wont go out to dinner if you don't go". So... am I supposed to sacrifice my health and well being just so that person will feel better about going? Right now, my life sucks and I just want to run and hide. I wish that I can go to restaurant and feel like the servers are trained in food allergies and behaving in such a way, not to embarrass their customers at their establishment. The food industry in NJ needs to be well trained as well.

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    Your article makes it sound a lot worse than it really is. There is no need to feel socially excluded or "bite into a hard piece of bread". In this day or age you can get very acceptable gluten-free products including breads (or make your own!) that are highly palatable. More and more restaurants will accommodate your needs and if you want to get together with friends there are many non gluten meals you can make. I have had excellent home made gluten-free bread, brownies, cookies, pasta and other gluten-free foods. Not to mention what is wrong with chicken, fish or lean beef? Quinoa makes a great side as does basmati or other rice ,etc,etc. Even the beer isn't that bad.

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    This is comforting to know, especially that Wegman's has made tremendous effort to make sure the products they label are indeed gluten-free. Shoprite, not so, in my opinion... in NJ. I've eaten products they listed as gluten-free and had reactions. It's been a horror story since. But dining out is something that our family do together ALL the time. Me, not so much because I HATE being "the one" with the problem... the inconvenience. Some people go as far as to say "I wont go out to dinner if you don't go". So... am I supposed to sacrifice my health and well being just so that person will feel better about going? Right now, my life sucks and I just want to run and hide. I wish that I can go to restaurant and feel like the servers are trained in food allergies and behaving in such a way, not to embarrass their customers at their establishment. The food industry in NJ needs to be well trained as well.

    I have recently become diagnosed with celiac disease. I am struggling. I often feel that my life sucks too! I am trying to work through this, but it is difficult. It helps knowing that I am not alone in this struggle. Yes, there are gluten-free restaurants and gluten-free breads, but it is not the same. It is an ordeal ordering at restaurants and stressing the gluten-free need. It is not worth it most times. I am hoping that this will get easier, but for now I am taking it day by day. Many days, I get so frustrated that I just would rather not eat, and don't. Yes, I do feel better physically, but socially and emotionally not so much.

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    My daughter, now 12, was diagnosed three years ago. The diagnosis and change in diet ended years of stomach pain, but I have to agree that it is not easy. My daughter initially felt excluded from many activities, but we go out of our way to find gluten-free options and restaurants so she can try "regular" foods. For many, the added expense of gluten-free foods can be prohibitive ($7.00 for a loaf of sandwich bread), but we are fortunate in that regard. I worry about cafeterias. Her school is okay, but there is nothing that feels safe at my company cafeteria due to dangers of cross-contamination. The disease requires a degree of confidence and independence of diagnosed children, and I appreciate that the author addresses this aspect of the disease.

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    Having celiac disease now going on 14 + years, I can say in the beginning it is overwhelming. I would say the first 2 years were difficult. You must tell yourself your diagnosis is not what defines you. You must make up your mind that this is what you HAVE to do, period. I fully embraced from the beginning I was not going to cheat (you're cheating yourself and risk unknown harm). But the variety of foods was certainly less back then. One never realizes until you have something like this how food is such a social event. People think oh it is okay to have a small piece or why are you worried at an event where things are placed on the table... you all know someone taking a piece of bread and will it pass over the gluten-free dish you have brought along to share.

    You become a detailed label reader; you must, and I never take a chance. It is about taking charge of your health. Having celiac disease has expanded what our family does eat instead of what we don't eat. Things I probably would not have tried or offered to my family are now eaten daily. Quinoa, coconut flour; the list is too long to list. You also have the opportunity to teach the public about something that maybe someday they may find they have or a love one has. Eating out is a challenge and it unfortunately does mean if I am coming along this means some homework on finding out if I can eat there etc. My family is great about this. Yes we do eat out less but that is not a bad thing either as I do like to cook from scratch.

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    Your article makes it sound a lot worse than it really is. There is no need to feel socially excluded or "bite into a hard piece of bread". In this day or age you can get very acceptable gluten-free products including breads (or make your own!) that are highly palatable. More and more restaurants will accommodate your needs and if you want to get together with friends there are many non gluten meals you can make. I have had excellent home made gluten-free bread, brownies, cookies, pasta and other gluten-free foods. Not to mention what is wrong with chicken, fish or lean beef? Quinoa makes a great side as does basmati or other rice ,etc,etc. Even the beer isn't that bad.

    I sure would love your recipe for gluten-free bread and goodies. The bread is what I miss the most. Thanks for anything you can send that will help. I live in Ontario, Canada.

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    Go to college at Virginia Tech if you have Gluten Syndrome! My son, a Senior at VT, is extremely sensitive to any gluten (including cross contamination) and follows a very strict zero gluten diet. He has NEVER had one problem with either the various dining halls or shopping in the community. These young people need to recognize that they are not the problem, but rather the gluten containing foods they used to consume are unhealthy, genetically modified and toxic... therefore, the food is the problem! I hope that young people will come to realize that they are actually lucky to find out the source of their health issues during their youth. I suffered for 48 years and not one doctor was even interested in finding out WHY I had various health issues, but rather just wanted to medicate me and tell me I was crazy. Proactive prevention is the key to optimal health, safety and well being! Good luck!

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    Guest Erin Smith

    Posted

    This article makes me really sad. I was diagnosed with celiac disease as a toddler and grew up gluten-free my entire life.

     

    When I went away to college, my friends were supportive and understanding even if the dining hall wasn't always the same. We went out to dinner at local restaurants, cooked dinner together in our on-campus housing, went to bars, and even had a 13-person Thanksgiving dinner at our house senior year of college. Although my friends teased me lightly about being a "silly yak" it was never malicious or ostracizing. We all had our things that we were dealing with in the house including exams, guys, bills, etc. and celiac disease was my "thing".

     

    I hope this article doesn't discourage potential college students from socializing and trying to fit in. My four (gluten-free) years of college were some of the best of my life.

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    Your article makes it sound a lot worse than it really is. There is no need to feel socially excluded or "bite into a hard piece of bread". In this day or age you can get very acceptable gluten-free products including breads (or make your own!) that are highly palatable. More and more restaurants will accommodate your needs and if you want to get together with friends there are many non gluten meals you can make. I have had excellent home made gluten-free bread, brownies, cookies, pasta and other gluten-free foods. Not to mention what is wrong with chicken, fish or lean beef? Quinoa makes a great side as does basmati or other rice ,etc,etc. Even the beer isn't that bad.

    I feel like I am playing Russian roulette. The main problem is cross contamination in the restaurants. 90% of the times I will become sick. Maybe it is the area I live. I have taken my food with me but most of my friends, co-workers and restaurant workers are resistant to this concept.

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    Your article makes it sound a lot worse than it really is. There is no need to feel socially excluded or "bite into a hard piece of bread". In this day or age you can get very acceptable gluten-free products including breads (or make your own!) that are highly palatable. More and more restaurants will accommodate your needs and if you want to get together with friends there are many non gluten meals you can make. I have had excellent home made gluten-free bread, brownies, cookies, pasta and other gluten-free foods. Not to mention what is wrong with chicken, fish or lean beef? Quinoa makes a great side as does basmati or other rice ,etc,etc. Even the beer isn't that bad.

    I have to disagree totally with your response. Not everyone lives in a gluten-free friendly area. Not everyone diagnosed with celiac disease can eat everything else; there are a lot of us with many other allergies/intolerances. Wegman's was mentioned in this article; the Wegman's in my area is small and I have to drive for 45 minutes to get some of my necessary food to make my own bread. My work space is constantly being contaminated by people walking around eating pizza, muffins, donuts, etc. Has it occurred to you that you might be getting contaminated, but are one of the unlucky ones who don't have any symptoms to let them know the damage is being done?

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    I have celiac disease, and I'm allergic to corn and sulfites, so I have to avoid them along with gluten. I can't eat out, and I'm never invited anywhere because I can't eat food away from home. Since all social get-togethers involve food, it's a lonely life for many of us with several food restrictions.

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    It's funny how this article makes me think about how I fought this issue. First, you've got to get people around you to understand that you don't want to be excluded from their social life because of celiac disease. Afterwards, you've got to make it easy for your pals to invite you. Usually, with my sister, when there's a family gathering, I ask her what she's planning on serving and I bring my own version of the meal. I do the same with my friends, and I try to invite them more often than they do. In those cases, everyone eats gluten-free food.

     

    Moreover, if you want to eat good gluten-free food, you've got to learn to cook. After a few months, it's becoming a pleasure and not a chore anymore. Not only will you eat better food all the time, but people will enjoy coming to your place to eat.

     

    Eating is a pleasure. You've just got to find a way to make it more enjoyable than what it already is.

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    I am gluten free. I have serious health problems if I eat gluten. I have cooked 95% of my meals the past 8 years.

    If you have a gluten problem then you need to see the strengths the problem can create for you.

    When living with other people, be consistent with your meal preparation times, amount of fridge space you use, doing your own dishes.

    Once you figure out how to eat alone, then you can figure out how to eat with other people. You must figure out how to eat meals alone first, because then if other peoples actions conflict with your routine, you can tell them you have been practicing this routine for this amount of time because you have dietary limitations. You can explain to them that when they conflict with your routine, they are creating unhealthy habits for you and for themselves.

    If you are having trouble fitting in I think it means you are having trouble eating alone. Become independent until you find people that you can train to cook to your gluten free standards.

    Do not eat food that will make you sick. Do not trust restaurants unless they have been deemed gluten free by an independent agency. Do not trust other people who say they have prepared gluten free food for you unless you watched them prepare the food.

    Elevated levels of consumption of gluten most likely occurred to enable large weaker groups of people to sustain themselves through the winter.

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    I was diagnosed four years ago, and two years ago I convinced my daughter (who tested negative for celiac) to try gluten-free since she was having so many stomach issues. The extra challenge is that she is vegetarian. It has been a journey! We love Udi's breads and Schar has some nice products as well. She continues to go out with friends and while she gets tired of salads, does it for the social time. Wish the girl in the article had found some new recipes to try with her roommates. They could have found some new favorites...

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    I sure would love your recipe for gluten-free bread and goodies. The bread is what I miss the most. Thanks for anything you can send that will help. I live in Ontario, Canada.

    I use a combination of Better Batter flour and the recipes on their site, Jules Shepherd flour and her cookbook and blog (a lot of the recipes overlap), BiaGlut pasta by Heinz - you can not tell this is gluten-free (so yummy), The Cake Doctor Bakes Gluten Free (she has two books I only have the first it is fabulous and a life saver, but I want the second). All of these you should be able to get online if you can't find locally. Gluten free on a shoestring and Elizabeth Hasselbeck cookbooks both have some good recipes in them as well, but I don't love the entire book. Hope this helps. Cake was my hard thing to give up. I don't eat it often, but I love it.

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    Guest cranscape

    Posted

    This article makes me really sad. I was diagnosed with celiac disease as a toddler and grew up gluten-free my entire life.

     

    When I went away to college, my friends were supportive and understanding even if the dining hall wasn't always the same. We went out to dinner at local restaurants, cooked dinner together in our on-campus housing, went to bars, and even had a 13-person Thanksgiving dinner at our house senior year of college. Although my friends teased me lightly about being a "silly yak" it was never malicious or ostracizing. We all had our things that we were dealing with in the house including exams, guys, bills, etc. and celiac disease was my "thing".

     

    I hope this article doesn't discourage potential college students from socializing and trying to fit in. My four (gluten-free) years of college were some of the best of my life.

    Since you were gluten-free from such a young age on, you probably, happily, don't know any different. Everyone who ever knew you already knows what your "thing" is. You're like a native speaker.

     

    I was diagnosed in my late twenties after years of pain and sickness from the age four on that was misdiagnosed and it hasn't been easy socially or otherwise. Even people who saw me when I was at my sickest don't seem to get it. Running into people who used to know me is bad too. They see I'm super skinny now and think I should stop my diet fad and eat some "real food."

     

    They get annoyed at going to the same short list of restaurants I've had good luck at. Even if I look through a menu and try to show them there isn't anything I can eat they act like it's because I'm not willing to take a risk and am too busy or that I actually enjoy shooting down their options.

     

    They are mad I can't eat all the gluten-free boxed cookies from the store they buy me to be "nice" because those mess up my digestion between the sugar and dairy and lack of nutrients. I've told them numerous times why I can't eat them and they act like I'm just being difficult. They find a gluten-free pizza option and get mad that I don't order it despite my saying I've gotten sick EVERY TIME I try gluten-free pizza at a restaurant because of cross contamination. Not just one day sick. I'm sick for a month, my hair falls out, I get a rash, I can't eat dairy for months... it's horrible.

     

    When you are diagnosed as a child you miss out on a lot of secondary stuff that crops up when you are older and have had damage and inflammation for 20+ years. I'm glad your experience has been easy, but it isn't the norm at all. A diagnosis while in college is a lot for some to handle who already are dealing with classes, a job, social life, etc.

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    Your article makes it sound a lot worse than it really is. There is no need to feel socially excluded or "bite into a hard piece of bread". In this day or age you can get very acceptable gluten-free products including breads (or make your own!) that are highly palatable. More and more restaurants will accommodate your needs and if you want to get together with friends there are many non gluten meals you can make. I have had excellent home made gluten-free bread, brownies, cookies, pasta and other gluten-free foods. Not to mention what is wrong with chicken, fish or lean beef? Quinoa makes a great side as does basmati or other rice ,etc,etc. Even the beer isn't that bad.

    You are wrong. My daughter has had celiac disease for 2 years now and is going through a lot of emotional stress because she is different. Kids' parties, etc. are not an option for her. She cries all the time. Regarding bread, I barely have time to cook regular meals, let alone bake my own breads. The bread they have available IS hard and disgusting.

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    Guest Morna Erwin

    Posted

    Your article makes it sound a lot worse than it really is. There is no need to feel socially excluded or "bite into a hard piece of bread". In this day or age you can get very acceptable gluten-free products including breads (or make your own!) that are highly palatable. More and more restaurants will accommodate your needs and if you want to get together with friends there are many non gluten meals you can make. I have had excellent home made gluten-free bread, brownies, cookies, pasta and other gluten-free foods. Not to mention what is wrong with chicken, fish or lean beef? Quinoa makes a great side as does basmati or other rice ,etc,etc. Even the beer isn't that bad.

    The trouble with relying on naturally gluten-free foods in a restaurant is cross-contamination. I have had eggs, hamburger patties, unmarinated chicken, and salads that were cross-contaminated (probably from a contaminated utensil, glove, or cooking surface). I have one Mexican restaurant that cleans the tortilla griddle before they cook my corn tortillas, but it can be a crapshoot, especially when travelling. I actually had a waitperson tell me that they could not guarantee that clean kitchen utensils would be used for my food. So many people eat gluten-free as a choice these days that often celiac disease is not taken seriously enough. I still eat out, but will often just visit with others if I can't trust the kitchen.

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    Guest GlutenFreeG

    Posted

    I'm glad to see celiacs stop eating out and publicly scrutinizing cross contamination that exists everywhere. Celiacs should NOT eat out unless it's a proven and trusted gluten-free restaurant, and therefore if a celiac can't eat there it should not be permitted to cater to gluten-free. I pray one day that we can get this real, but for now the gluten-free movement is jaded and failing.

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    This article is quite sad, but I agree with a lot of the points mentioned. It is very hard for me to stick with a strictly gluten-free diet. It isn't until I try to convince myself that I can eat "normal food" and then end up slipping up on my gluten-free lifestyle that I realize I don't want to live so reckless anymore. It's an uphill battle because I don't have any type of support system to encourage me to take of myself other than myself. My family, boyfriend, and friends all act as if being gluten-free is some diet fad. It's disheartening and I get emotionally drained to the point of just giving in to gluten quite frequently, then I spend the next two days sick and mentally exhausted. It's very tough, but I'm slowly learning that I'm the only one who can keep myself healthy and I need to try to find peace within myself to stick to the betterment of my health. Thank you for this article. It's a real wake up call to realize that I'm not the only one struggling and that there is hope and support within the celiac community.

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    I was diagnosed with coeliac disease in 2000 and fortunately the United Kingdom has good food labeling information. I don't know how many "Wegman" stores there are in the US but they do sell gluten-free pasta and I can get gluten-free beer in the UK! I live in a family where I am a coeliac, my daughter has autism, which limits what she eats. My wife has no restrictions but the solution is to eat more rice or cook a separate gluten-free pasta for me. I miss proper bread and biscuits !

     

    I am in the US and Wegmans is not all over the US. I happen to live in the area where they are but still not close to me. I drive there to buy gluten-free stuff.

     

    The labeling here sucks. I am recovering from getting gluten, but in this case I forgot to read the full label as I am still getting the hang of his and my thinking is affected by gluten.

    I can't eat rice nor any grains as they are finding out all grains have a type of gluten in them. They all make me sick for sure.

     

    Paleo diet is best for beans also make me sick so I agree any base seed is a problem to eat.

     

    I sneeze I get sick from food. I don't eat out but if I do I eat at Olive Garden.

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    Guest SK Smith

    Posted

    I agree with most of the article except, perhaps she needs to try some different gluten-free breads. They don't have to be hard and dry - Udi's or Kinnikinnick soft for instance.

    As a Vegan who doesn't eat dairy or meat and can't have saturated fat due to multiple schlerosis or xantham gum due to gluten intolerance or soy due to the estrogens, I have found absolutely NO breads that are safe. They always have soy or fat or some type of gum or some vinegar or eggs or something else. Even legumes are hands-off (which means I might have to start eating fish). I have looked in all the surrounding stores within in hour and on Amazon. Nothing.

    I was just diagnosed a month ago and the difficulty in finding go-to foods is a difficult and steep learning curve. And, certainly, the social aspect stinks. My children will probably be diagnosed soon, and I KNOW that will be a nightmare. My son LIVES for the snacks in orchestra - usually pizza. Fortunately, 2 other kids in his group are already gluten-free - but they usually are left with nothing to eat because the snack people don't think about it. At least I can take food for all 3 of them. My daughter's friends think the food she takes for lunch is already weird, much harder when or if she decides to actually go gluten-free (as she needs to) and can't eat food at the dances or during play practice.

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    Sayer Ji
    Approximately 70% of all American calories come from a combination of the following four foods: wheat, dairy, soy and corn - assuming, that is, we exclude calories from sugar.
    Were it true that these four foods were health promoting, whole-wheat-bread-munching, soy-milk-guzzling, cheese-nibbling, corn-chip having Americans would probably be experiencing exemplary health among the world's nations. To the contrary, despite the massive amount of calories ingested from these purported "health foods," we are perhaps the most malnourished and sickest people on the planet today. The average American adult is on 12 prescribed medications, demonstrating just how diseased, or for that matter, brainwashed and manipulated, we are.
    How could this be? After all, doesn't the USDA Food Pyramid emphasize whole grains like wheat above all other food categories, and isn’t dairy so indispensible to our health that it is afforded a category all of its own? 
    Unfortunately these “authoritative” recommendations go  much further in serving the special interests of the industries that produce these commodities than in serving the biological needs of those who are told it would be beneficial to consume them.  After all, grains themselves have only been consumed for 500 generations – that is, only since the transition out of the Paleolithic into the Neolithic era approximately 10,000 years ago.  Since the advent of homo sapiens 2.5 million years ago our bodies have survived on a hunter and gatherer diet, where foods were consumed in whole form, and raw!  Corn, Soy and Cow's Milk have only just been introduced into our diet, and therefore are “experimental” food sources which given the presence of toxic lectins, endocrine disruptors, anti-nutrients, enzyme inhibitors, indigestible gluey proteins, etc, don’t appear to make much biological sense to consume in large quantities - and perhaps, as is my belief, given their deleterious effects on health, they should not be consumed at all.
    Even if our belief system doesn’t allow for the concept of evolution, or that our present existence is borne on vast stretches of biological time, we need only consider the undeniable fact that these four “health foods” are also sources for industrial adhesives, in order to see how big a problem they present.
    For one, wheat flour is used to make glues for book binding and wall-papering, as well as being the key ingredient for paper mache mortar. Sticky soy protein has replaced the need for formaldehyde based adhesives for making plywood, and is used to make plastic, composite and many other things you probably wouldn’t consider eating. The whitish protein known as casein in cow's milk is the active ingredient in Elmer's glue and has been used for paint since ancient times. Finally, corn gluten is used as a glue to hold cardboard boxes together. Eating glue doesn't sound too appetizing does it?  Indeed, when you consider what these sticky glycoproteins will do to the delicate microvilli inside our intestines, a scenario, nightmarish in proportions, unfolds. 
    All nutrients are absorbed in the intestine through the microvilli. These finger-like projections from off the surface of the intestine amplify the surface area of absorption in the intestine to the area the size of a tennis court. When coated with undigested or partially digested glue (glycoproteins), not only is the absorption of nutrients reduced leading to malabsorption and consequently malnourishment, but the villi themselves become damaged/dessicated/ inflammed and begin to undergo atrophy - at times even breaking off.  The damage to the intestinal membrane caused by these glues ultimately leads to perforation of the one cell thick intestinal wall, often leading to "leaky gut syndrome": a condition where undigested proteins and plant toxins called lectins enter the bloodstream wreaking havoc on the immune system. A massive amount of research (which is given little to no attention both in the mass media and allopathic medicine) indicates that diseases as varied as fibromyalgia, diabetes, autism, cancer, arthritis, crohn's, chronic fatigue, artheroscerosis, and many others, are directly influenced by the immune mediated responses wheat, dairy, soy and corn can provoke.
    Of all four suspect foods Wheat, whose omnipresence in the S.A.D or Standard American Diet indicates something of an obsession, may be the primary culprit.  According to Clinical Pathologist Carolyn Pierini the wheat lectin called "gliadin" is known to to participate in activating NF kappa beta proteins which are involved in every acute and chronic inflammatory disorder including neurodegenerative disease, inflammatory bowel disease, infectious and autoimmune diseases.
    In support of this indictment of Wheat’s credibility as a “health food,” Glucosamine – the blockbuster supplement for arthritis and joint problems – has been shown to bind to and deactivate the lectin in wheat that causes inflammation. It may just turn out to be true that millions of Americans who are finding relief with Glucosamine would benefit more directly from removing the wheat (and related allergens) from their diets rather than popping a multitude of natural and synthetic pills to cancel one of Wheat’s main toxic actions. Not only would they be freed up from taking supplements like Glucosamine, but many would also be able to avoid taking dangerous Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) like Tylenol, Aspirin and Ibuprofen, which are known to cause tens of thousands of cases of liver damage, internal hemorrhaging and stomach bleeding each and every year.
    One might wonder:  “How is it that if America's favorite sources of calories: Wheat and Dairy, are so obviously pro-inflammatory, immunosuppressive, and generally toxic, why would anyone eat them?”  ANSWER: They are powerful forms of socially sanctioned self-medication.
    Wheat and Dairy contain gliadorphin and gluten exorphins, and casomorphin, respectively.  These partially digested proteins known as peptides act on the opioid receptors in the brain, generating a temporary euphoria or analgesic effect that has been clinically documented and measured in great detail.  The Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology in Magdeburg, Germany has shown that a Casein (cow's milk protein) derivative has 1000 times greater antinociceptive activity (pain inhibition) than morphine. Not only do these morphine like substances create a painkilling "high," but they can invoke serious addictive/obsessive behavior, learning disabilities, autism, inability to focus, and other serious physical and mental handicaps. 
    As the glues destroy the delicate surface of our intestines, we for the life of us can't understand why we are so drawn to consume these "comfort foods", heaping "drug soaked" helping after helping.  Many of us struggle to shake ourselves out of our wheat and dairy induced stupor with stimulants like coffee, caffeinated soda and chocolate, creating a viscous “self-medicating” cycle of sedation and stimulation.
    As if this were not enough, Wheat, Dairy, and Soy also happen to have some of the highest naturally occurring concentrations of Glutamic Acid, which is the natural equivalent of monosodium glutamate. This excitotoxin gives these foods great "flavor" (or what the Japanese call umami) but can cause the neurons to fire to the point of death.  It is no wonder that with all these drug-like qualities most Americans consume wheat and dairy in each and every meal of their day, for each and every day of their lives.
    Whether you now believe that removing Wheat, Dairy, Soy and Corn from your diet is a good idea, or still need convincing, it doesn’t hurt to take the “elimination diet” challenge. The real test is to eliminate these suspect foods for at least 2 weeks, see how you feel, and then if you aren’t feeling like you have made significant improvements in your health, reintroduce them and see what happens.  Trust in your feelings, listen to your body, and you will move closer to what is healthy for you.
    This article owes much of its content and insight to the work of John Symes whose ground-breaking research on the dangers of wheat, dairy, corn and soy have been a great eye opener to me, and a continual source of inspiration in my goal of educating myself and others.


    Anne Marie Dunphy
    Celiac.com 03/11/2009 - I recently had an unfortunate health experience related to celiac disease.  I learned long ago that it’s my responsibility to manage my own health, so I came up with a strategy that was successful.  Along the way, I also learned some important information that really helped me understand the problem and the eventual solution.  Perhaps this information will help you avoid a similar health crisis.  I’ve included links that can give you additional information.  Disclaimer: I’m not a medical doctor.  This is information that I have gathered based on my own experiences and research.
    Celiac Disease
    I have celiac disease. I manage it quite well through my diet.  However, if I ingest anything with gluten, for instance a wayward crouton in a restaurant salad, I have a severe reaction that starts within five minutes.  All or some of the following will occur: hives from head to toe, stomach cramps, uncontrollable diarrhea, vomiting, asthma, severe lethargy.  I fall into an uncontrollable sleep that takes about four hours to run its course.  Needless to say, I avoid gluten at all costs.
    A Bit of History
    Although I am a remarkable person (like all of us), my health history has been quite unremarkable.  Nothing was ever wrong with me and I wasn’t allergic to anything.  I can count on one hand how many times I’ve taken antibiotics in my entire life.  In the past 30+ years, I never went to the doctor for an illness.  I’ve had colds, various and sundry viruses and infections, but they ran their course with slowing down, plenty of rest and fluids.  I believe that the primary strategy should be to give your body the time to heal itself first, and if that fails look for an alternative strategy from your doctor.
    Imagine my surprise when about six years ago the symptoms of celiac disease manifested themselves.  (Note: I was going through an acute stressful time in my life when this occurred.)  Along the way, other unexpected food allergies have presented themselves as well.
    One of my favorite foods was peanut butter.  Since I was a little girl, I loved feasting on “peanut butter on spoon”.  Out of the blue one day, a typical teaspoon of one of my favorite foods sent me into an anaphylactic reaction.  And then a few months after that incident, a bite of a granola bar with cashews sent me on my first ambulance ride with a rapidly constricting throat to the emergency ward.  My favorite food is now a deadly poison.
    I’ve had mild intestinal reactions to all vinegars and vinegar products (a little balsamic is OK), more than three glasses of red wine (not white wine or champagne), milk and cream (not cheese, thank the Universe!).  I’ve also realized that I’m thirsty all the time.  It seems that no matter how much water I drink, I can’t seem to quench my thirst.  I even sleep with water next to my bed and drink several glasses throughout the night and still wake up thirsty.  The water goes right through me and doesn’t seem to be absorbed.  (I have recently been prodded, poked, examined and tested by a battery of doctors as a result of my once in 50-year checkup and they all agree that I’m the picture of health.)
    Both my mom and my grandmother suffered from asthma; my grandmother dealt with it her whole life.  When I have an asthmatic reaction, my wheezing and coughing sound just like theirs!  I remembered them being armed with their inhalers and their steroids at all times.  I also remembered that these medical weapons didn’t stop the asthma attacks or the wheezing or uncontrollable coughing.  They only dealt with the symptoms, not the underlying problem.  Mom’s asthma went away when she started eating a gluten free diet.
    The Incident
    So I’ve come to enjoy cooking.  Regardless of the disastrous results of my past cooking experiences well documented by my children, close friends and family, this new hobby relaxes me at the end of the day, is creative, saves money and insures a truly gluten and allergy free diet.
    I recently made a delicious French Onion and Ham Cream Soup.  It was inspired by some wonderful French spices I bought from Penzey Spices.  I made a big pot of the soup and had it for different meals throughout the week.  I didn’t notice at the time an increased feeling of lethargy, intestinal rumblings and increased thirst that got progressively worse through the week.
    And then it happened.  About five minutes after devouring the last of my delectable French Onion and Ham Cream Soup, the tell-tale signs of an oncoming asthma attack occurred: mucous pouring into my lungs, wheezing, airways closing up, unrelenting coughing.
    In addition, I had horrible abdominal cramping.  I was tremendously thirsty, but the water just seemed to go through me and make me even thirstier.  At about 4:00 am just as I was about to get myself to the hospital, I started to slowly stabilize, meaning I wasn’t getting worse.
    I slept for a little bit, then woke up coughing uncontrollably.  My throat was so parched it felt like sandpaper.  I dragged myself through a day of work exhausted, not being able to really get a good breath and feeling so very thirsty.
    That night I literally coughed all night long sitting straight up in a chair; I couldn’t lie down because of the coughing.  I couldn’t go to work the next day.  I needed to discover why this happened, how I can prevent it from happening again and implement an immediate strategy for managing this health crisis.
    Hypothesis
    I realized there was a relationship between several factors: celiac disease, since I had no allergies until it manifested itself; cow’s milk, which I knew was a highly allergic food; asthma, as the allergic reaction, and dehydration, because of the incessant thirst.  By understanding how all of these factors related to each other, I thought I could figure out a strategy to 1) get myself into a healthy state quickly and 2) prevent this health crisis from happening again. (Even thought I knew this was an asthma attack, I wanted to make doubly sure it wasn’t pneumonia or something similar.  I had no fever, chills, aches or pains, headache, or upper respiratory infection.  I was fine one minute and not fine the next.)
    Research
    Asthma is a disease in which inflammation of the airways causes airflow into and out of the lungs to be restricted.  When an asthma attack occurs, mucus production is increased, muscles of the bronchial tree become tight, and the lining of the air passages swells, reducing airflow and producing the characteristic wheezing and coughing.  Asthma symptoms are usually worse at night.
    There is high correlation between people who have celiac disease and people who have sensitivities to proteins found in cow's milk.  Milk is one of the most common food allergens in the American diet.  And most cows eat a lot of grain and perhaps there’s a link here.  Milk allergy symptoms can occur within minutes or hours after consuming the dairy product.  They can be triggered by a very small amount of milk protein in the system. 
    There is also a relationship between celiac disease, asthma and dehydration.  People with celiac disease are often very thirsty even after drinking lots of water.  And so are people with asthma.  If fact, many doctors now think that asthma is a symptom of the body managing its water supply.
    This is how it works…
    Water is needed for every function of the body. Our bodies are 75% water and our brains are 85% water.  Because of the water used in breathing, digestion, enzyme and hormone production, immune function, toxin removal and so on, we need to replace that water frequently throughout the day or our health will suffer.
    When we start to dehydrate, histamine production increases to conserve water in our bodies. 
    This is vital since our lungs must remain moist to work properly.  Excess histamine, a defense against losing more water, makes it difficult to breath and triggers an asthma attack.  Histamine also stimulates mucous production to help seal in moisture, but that also leads to increased breathing difficulties.  Histamines are also important for immune function, but during dehydration they are mostly used to look for water.  If dehydration becomes chronic, the immune system will suffer; allergies, both inhalant and food allergies, will result because histamine is important for the proper balance of Tcells, antibodies and so on.
    Elevated histamine in the lungs causes the spasm of the bronchioles.  This conserves moisture that would normally be lost during breathing.  The mucus that clogs up the airways is the body’s attempt to keep the airways from completely drying out.  Inflammation in the airways is the result of the body bringing more “micro-circulation” to the lungs as a result of dehydration.
    Common problem foods for people with asthma are dairy and gluten.  Both are very hard to digest and require a lot of water to break down.  If there is not enough water in the digestive tract when food is taken in, water will be pulled from other parts of the body and localized dehydration will result.  This can lead to asthma, among other problems.
    Allergy symptoms of any kind are a sign that we need to drink more water.  Antihistamines and most medicines, either directly or indirectly, actually are counterproductive for the body because they further dehydrate the body and shut off the body’s search for water.  Pain, inflammation and digestive problems are also typically signs of dehydration.  Dehydration is a common cause of migraines, for example. 
    And then I unexpectedly learned about salt…
    Salt is the other half of the hydration equation.  Salt is vital for the generation of hydroelectric energy and transmission of nerve impulses in all the cells.  Salt acts as a natural antihistamine through salt-sensing nerves on the tongue and plays a major role in regulating water.  Without enough salt, water is not absorbed.
    My Strategy
    The first step was to get myself in a healthy state.  My re-hydration plans included continually drinking filtered water even through the night, teaspoons of honey to soothe my raw throat when needed and pinches of pink Australian sea salt (a Christmas gift from my wonderful mom) on my tongue throughout the day and night when I felt I needed it, although any sea salt would do.  I also had vegetable juice and fruit juice for additional fluids.
    I noticed the salt working in a couple of hours.  I was beginning to absorb the water (I didn’t have to pee every time I drank some water).  It took about two days before the thirst went away.  It was great waking up without a parched throat.  The coughing was still uncontrollable, especially at night, but instead of a constant, non-productive coughing and horrible wheezing, the mucus was beginning to become looser.  It took another three nights before I could sleep lying down, but the mucus had really broken up.  The coughing was actually allowing the mucus to get out of my lungs.  It took about six days to feel like myself again.  I did gain about five pounds.  But I lost it quickly and it was fat lost, not precious water.  Besides, there’s nothing glamorous about walking around in a dehydrated, sickly state.
    The second step is to not let this happen again.  I’m now drinking no less than 10 eight-ounce glasses of water every day with a pinch of salt on my tongue if I feel I need it.  I need about ¼ teaspoon of salt for every quart of water I drink.  After a lifetime of poor medical advice, I now know that salt is my friend.  If I drink coffee or wine or if I get the nutty idea to exercise, I have to drink more water.  And no more milk and cream - at least until I’m stabilized for awhile.
    If I feel an asthma attack coming on, the best treatment is to drink 2-3 cups of water and put a pinch of sea salt on my tongue.  This will provide my body with the water it needs and the salt will send a signal to my brain to relax the bronchioles by letting it know relief is coming. 
    Conclusion
    As difficult as this last health adventure was, I learned something that has changed the way I feel and has optimized my health.  I found the root of the problem and fixed it instead of following mainstream medical thinking and putting a band aid on the symptoms.  It’s really scary when it feels like your body is turning on you, and very empowering when you use science and knowledge to get yourself back.  I’ve always said when it comes to business, “the market speaks, just listen.”  I now need to take that advice for myself.  My body speaks; I just have to listen!

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 11/21/2013 - Gluten-free food manufacturer Against the Grain, of Brattelboro Vermont, has filed a trademark infringement lawsuit against a California company doing business as Against All Grain.
    Against The Grain Gourmet Foods has filed documents in the U.S. District Court for the District of Vermont asking the court to order Against All Grain to give up all claims to the name.
    The lawsuit, which was filed on Oct. 11, alleges the use of Against All Grain by the defendants "is likely to cause confusion, to cause mistake, or to deceive and therefore constitutes infringement of Plaintiff's federally registered trademark ..."
    In the court documents, attorneys for Against The Grain assert that the defendants are using a website and Facebook page and have published a cookbook of gluten-free recipes using their "Against All Grain" marks.
    The documents filed by Against The Grain further assert that Against All Grain's alleged infringements have devalued Against The Grain's brand and will confuse consumers, some of whom might assume there is a relationship between the two companies.
    Sound complicated? It is, a bit, and not just for the similarity of names. Want to read a detailed account?
    Check out this excellent article by Bob Audette for the Brattleboro Reformer, which does a great job of laying out the legal zigs and zags of this particular gluten-free name battle.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/25/2015 - Many people who are concerned that they may have celiac disease are not sure where to begin. Many people simply stop eating gluten and call it a day, choosing to avoid what can be a long, drawn-out process of getting an official diagnosis.
    If you suffer from any of the 10 Most Common Complaints of Celiac Patients, you might want to consider the possibility of celiac disease.
    Most doctors, however eager they may be to render proper treatment, are bound by clinical treatment protocols and guidelines that limit the circumstances under which they can order blood screens for celiac disease.
    So, when should doctors test people for celiac disease? According to the American College of Gastroenterology's (ACG) clinical guideline on diagnosis and treatment of celiac disease, people should be tested for celiac disease if they have:
    Signs and symptoms of malabsorption, including chronic diarrhea with weight loss, steatorrhea, abdominal pain after eating, and bloating.
    Or Laboratory evidence of malabsorption, particularly in people who have a first-degree family member with a confirmed celiac disease diagnosis. This includes associated nutritional deficiencies.
    Or A personal history of an autoimmune disease, or an IgA deficiency.
    Or Biopsy-proven DH, iron-deficiency anemia refractory to oral supplementation, or hypertransaminasemia with no other origins. It's interesting to me that the above guidelines don't match up very well with the top ten physical complaints of people who have celiac disease. Those complaints are: Osteopenia/Osteoporosis; Anemia; Cryptogenic hypertransaminasemia; Diarrhea; Bloating; Aphthous stomatitis; Alternating bowel habit; Constipation; Gastroesophageal reflux disease and Recurrent miscarriages.
    What do you think? Do doctors need to have more freedom to conduct blood screens when considering the possibility of celiac disease?
    Source:
    US Pharmacist. 2014;39(12):44-48. 

  • Recent Articles

    Connie Sarros
    Celiac.com 04/21/2018 - Dear Friends and Readers,
    I have been writing articles for Scott Adams since the 2002 Summer Issue of the Scott-Free Press. The Scott-Free Press evolved into the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. I felt honored when Scott asked me ten years ago to contribute to his quarterly journal and it's been a privilege to write articles for his publication ever since.
    Due to personal health reasons and restrictions, I find that I need to retire. My husband and I can no longer travel the country speaking at conferences and to support groups (which we dearly loved to do) nor can I commit to writing more books, articles, or menus. Consequently, I will no longer be contributing articles to the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. 
    My following books will still be available at Amazon.com:
    Gluten-free Cooking for Dummies Student's Vegetarian Cookbook for Dummies Wheat-free Gluten-free Dessert Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Reduced Calorie Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Cookbook for Kids and Busy Adults (revised version) My first book was published in 1996. My journey since then has been incredible. I have met so many in the celiac community and I feel blessed to be able to call you friends. Many of you have told me that I helped to change your life – let me assure you that your kind words, your phone calls, your thoughtful notes, and your feedback throughout the years have had a vital impact on my life, too. Thank you for all of your support through these years.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/20/2018 - A digital media company and a label data company are teaming up to help major manufacturers target, reach and convert their desired shoppers based on dietary needs, such as gluten-free diet. The deal could bring synergy in emerging markets such as the gluten-free and allergen-free markets, which represent major growth sectors in the global food industry. 
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    "Brands with very specific product benefits, gluten-free for example, require precise targeting to efficiently reach and convert their desired shoppers,” says Todd Morris, President of Catalina's Go-to-Market organization, adding that “Catalina offers the only purchase-based targeting solution with this capability.” 
    Label Insight’s clients include food and beverage giants such as Unilever, Ben & Jerry's, Lipton and Hellman’s. Label Insight technology has helped the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) build the sector’s very first scientifically accurate database of food ingredients, health attributes and claims.
    Morris says the joint partnership will allow Catalina to “enhance our dataset and further increase our ability to target shoppers who are currently buying - or have shown intent to buy - in these emerging categories,” including gluten-free, allergen-free, and other free-from foods.
    The deal will likely make for easier, more precise targeting of goods to consumers, and thus provide benefits for manufacturers and retailers looking to better serve their retail food customers, especially in specialty areas like gluten-free and allergen-free foods.
    Source:
    fdfworld.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/19/2018 - Previous genome and linkage studies indicate the existence of a new disease triggering mechanism that involves amino acid metabolism and nutrient sensing signaling pathways. In an effort to determine if amino acids might play a role in the development of celiac disease, a team of researchers recently set out to investigate if plasma amino acid levels differed among children with celiac disease compared with a control group.
     
    The research team included Åsa Torinsson Naluai, Ladan Saadat Vafa, Audur H. Gudjonsdottir, Henrik Arnell, Lars Browaldh, and Daniel Agardh. They are variously affiliated with the Institute of Biomedicine, Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, Karolinska University Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, CLINTEC, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Clinical Science and Education, Karolinska Institute, Sodersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden; the Department of Mathematical Sciences, Chalmers University of Technology, Gothenburg, Sweden; the Diabetes & Celiac Disease Unit, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, Malmö, Sweden; and with the Nathan S Kline Institute in the U.S.A.
    First, the team used liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS) to analyze amino acid levels in fasting plasma samples from 141 children with celiac disease and 129 non-celiac disease controls. They then crafted a general linear model using age and experimental effects as covariates to compare amino acid levels between children with celiac disease and non-celiac control subjects.
    Compared with the control group, seven out of twenty-three children with celiac disease showed elevated levels of the the following amino acids: tryptophan; taurine; glutamic acid; proline; ornithine; alanine; and methionine.
    The significance of the individual amino acids do not survive multiple correction, however, multivariate analyses of the amino acid profile showed significantly altered amino acid levels in children with celiac disease overall and after correction for age, sex and experimental effects.
    This study shows that amino acids can influence inflammation and may play a role in the development of celiac disease.
    Source:
    PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/18/2018 - To the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service animals.
    If you’ve flown anywhere lately, you may have seen them. People flying with their designated “emotional support” animals. We’re not talking genuine service animals, like seeing eye dogs, or hearing ear dogs, or even the Belgian Malinois that alerts its owner when there is gluten in food that may trigger her celiac disease.
    Now, to be honest, some of those animals in question do perform a genuine service for those who need emotional support dogs, like veterans with PTSD.
    However, many of these animals are not service animals at all. Many of these animals perform no actual service to their owners, and are nothing more than thinly disguised pets. Many lack proper training, and some have caused serious problems for the airlines and for other passengers.
    Now the major airlines are taking note and introducing stringent requirements for service animals.
    Delta was the first to strike. As reported by the New York Times on January 19: “Effective March 1, Delta, the second largest US airline by passenger traffic, said it will require passengers seeking to fly with pets to present additional documents outlining the passenger’s need for the animal and proof of its training and vaccinations, 48 hours prior to the flight.… This comes in response to what the carrier said was a 150 percent increase in service and support animals — pets, often dogs, that accompany people with disabilities — carried onboard since 2015.… Delta said that it flies some 700 service animals a day. Among them, customers have attempted to fly with comfort turkeys, gliding possums, snakes, spiders, and other unusual pets.”
    Fresh from an unsavory incident with an “emotional support” peacock incident, United Airlines has followed Delta’s lead and set stricter rules for emotional support animals. United’s rules also took effect March 1, 2018.
    So, to the relief of many bewildered passengers and crew, no more comfort turkeys, geese, possums or other questionable pets will be flying on Delta or United without meeting the airlines' strict new requirements for service and emotional support animals.
    Source:
    cnbc.com

    admin
    WHAT IS CELIAC DISEASE?
    Celiac disease is an autoimmune condition that affects around 1% of the population. People with celiac disease suffer an autoimmune reaction when they consume wheat, rye or barley. The immune reaction is triggered by certain proteins in the wheat, rye, or barley, and, left untreated, causes damage to the small, finger-like structures, called villi, that line the gut. The damage occurs as shortening and villous flattening in the lamina propria and crypt regions of the intestines. The damage to these villi then leads to numerous other issues that commonly plague people with untreated celiac disease, including poor nutritional uptake, fatigue, and myriad other problems.
    Celiac disease mostly affects people of Northern European descent, but recent studies show that it also affects large numbers of people in Italy, China, Iran, India, and numerous other places thought to have few or no cases.
    Celiac disease is most often uncovered because people experience symptoms that lead them to get tests for antibodies to gluten. If these tests are positive, then the people usually get biopsy confirmation of their celiac disease. Once they adopt a gluten-free diet, they usually see gut healing, and major improvements in their symptoms. 
    CLASSIC CELIAC DISEASE SYMPTOMS
    Symptoms of celiac disease can range from the classic features, such as diarrhea, upset stomach, bloating, gas, weight loss, and malnutrition, among others.
    LESS OBVIOUS SYMPTOMS
    Celiac disease can often less obvious symptoms, such fatigue, vitamin and nutrient deficiencies, anemia, to name a few. Often, these symptoms are regarded as less obvious because they are not gastrointestinal in nature. You got that right, it is not uncommon for people with celiac disease to have few or no gastrointestinal symptoms. That makes spotting and connecting these seemingly unrelated and unclear celiac symptoms so important.
    NO SYMPTOMS
    Currently, most people diagnosed with celiac disease do not show symptoms, but are diagnosed on the basis of referral for elevated risk factors. 

    CELIAC DISEASE VS. GLUTEN INTOLERANCE
    Gluten intolerance is a generic term for people who have some sort of sensitivity to gluten. These people may or may not have celiac disease. Researchers generally agree that there is a condition called non-celiac gluten sensitivity. That term has largely replaced the term gluten-intolerance. What’s the difference between celiac disease and non-celiac gluten-sensitivity? 
    CELIAC DISEASE VS. NON-CELIAC GLUTEN SENSITIVITY (NCGS)
    Gluten triggers symptoms and immune reactions in people with celiac disease. Gluten can also trigger symptoms in some people with NCGS, but the similarities largely end there.

    There are four main differences between celiac disease and non-celiac gluten sensitivity:
    No Hereditary Link in NCGS
    Researchers know for certain that genetic heredity plays a major role in celiac disease. If a first-degree relative has celiac disease, then you have a statistically higher risk of carrying genetic markers DQ2 and/or DQ8, and of developing celiac disease yourself. NCGS is not known to be hereditary. Some research has shown certain genetic associations, such as some NCGS patients, but there is no proof that NCGS is hereditary. No Connection with Celiac-related Disorders
    Unlike celiac disease, NCGS is so far not associated with malabsorption, nutritional deficiencies, or a higher risk of autoimmune disorders or intestinal malignancies. No Immunological or Serological Markers
    People with celiac disease nearly always test positive for antibodies to gluten proteins. Researchers have, as yet, identified no such antobodies or serologic markers for NCGS. That means that, unlike with celiac disease, there are no telltale screening tests that can point to NCGS. Absence of Celiac Disease or Wheat Allergy
    Doctors diagnose NCGS only by excluding both celiac disease, an IgE-mediated allergy to wheat, and by the noting ongoing adverse symptoms associated with gluten consumption. WHAT ABOUT IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME (IBS) AND IRRITABLE BOWEL DISEASE (IBD)?
    IBS and IBD are usually diagnosed in part by ruling out celiac disease. Many patients with irritable bowel syndrome are sensitive to gluten. Many experience celiac disease-like symptoms in reaction to wheat. However, patients with IBS generally show no gut damage, and do not test positive for antibodies to gliadin and other proteins as do people with celiac disease. Some IBS patients also suffer from NCGS.

    To add more confusion, many cases of IBS are, in fact, celiac disease in disguise.

    That said, people with IBS generally react to more than just wheat. People with NCGS generally react to wheat and not to other things, but that’s not always the case. Doctors generally try to rule out celiac disease before making a diagnosis of IBS or NCGS. 
    Crohn’s Disease and celiac disease share many common symptoms, though causes are different.  In Crohn’s disease, the immune system can cause disruption anywhere along the gastrointestinal tract, and a diagnosis of Crohn’s disease typically requires more diagnostic testing than does a celiac diagnosis.  
    Crohn’s treatment consists of changes to diet and possible surgery.  Up to 10% of Crohn's patients can have both of conditions, which suggests a genetic connection, and researchers continue to examine that connection.
    Is There a Connection Between Celiac Disease, Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity and Irritable Bowel Syndrome? Large Number of Irritable Bowel Syndrome Patients Sensitive To Gluten Some IBD Patients also Suffer from Non-Celiac Gluten Sensitivity Many Cases of IBS and Fibromyalgia Actually Celiac Disease in Disguise CELIAC DISEASE DIAGNOSIS
    Diagnosis of celiac disease can be difficult. 

    Perhaps because celiac disease presents clinically in such a variety of ways, proper diagnosis often takes years. A positive serological test for antibodies against tissue transglutaminase is considered a very strong diagnostic indicator, and a duodenal biopsy revealing villous atrophy is still considered by many to be the diagnostic gold standard. 
    But this idea is being questioned; some think the biopsy is unnecessary in the face of clear serological tests and obvious symptoms. Also, researchers are developing accurate and reliable ways to test for celiac disease even when patients are already avoiding wheat. In the past, patients needed to be consuming wheat to get an accurate test result. 
    Celiac disease can have numerous vague, or confusing symptoms that can make diagnosis difficult.  Celiac disease is commonly misdiagnosed by doctors. Read a Personal Story About Celiac Disease Diagnosis from the Founder of Celiac.com Currently, testing and biopsy still form the cornerstone of celiac diagnosis.
    TESTING
    There are several serologic (blood) tests available that screen for celiac disease antibodies, but the most commonly used is called a tTG-IgA test. If blood test results suggest celiac disease, your physician will recommend a biopsy of your small intestine to confirm the diagnosis.
    Testing is fairly simple and involves screening the patients blood for antigliadin (AGA) and endomysium antibodies (EmA), and/or doing a biopsy on the areas of the intestines mentioned above, which is still the standard for a formal diagnosis. Also, it is now possible to test people for celiac disease without making them concume wheat products.

    BIOPSY
    Until recently, biopsy confirmation of a positive gluten antibody test was the gold standard for celiac diagnosis. It still is, but things are changing fairly quickly. Children can now be accurately diagnosed for celiac disease without biopsy. Diagnosis based on level of TGA-IgA 10-fold or more the ULN, a positive result from the EMA tests in a second blood sample, and the presence of at least 1 symptom could avoid risks and costs of endoscopy for more than half the children with celiac disease worldwide.

    WHY A GLUTEN-FREE DIET?
    Currently the only effective, medically approved treatment for celiac disease is a strict gluten-free diet. Following a gluten-free diet relieves symptoms, promotes gut healing, and prevents nearly all celiac-related complications. 
    A gluten-free diet means avoiding all products that contain wheat, rye and barley, or any of their derivatives. This is a difficult task as there are many hidden sources of gluten found in the ingredients of many processed foods. Still, with effort, most people with celiac disease manage to make the transition. The vast majority of celiac disease patients who follow a gluten-free diet see symptom relief and experience gut healing within two years.
    For these reasons, a gluten-free diet remains the only effective, medically proven treatment for celiac disease.
    WHAT ABOUT ENZYMES, VACCINES, ETC.?
    There is currently no enzyme or vaccine that can replace a gluten-free diet for people with celiac disease.
    There are enzyme supplements currently available, such as AN-PEP, Latiglutetenase, GluteGuard, and KumaMax, which may help to mitigate accidental gluten ingestion by celiacs. KumaMax, has been shown to survive the stomach, and to break down gluten in the small intestine. Latiglutenase, formerly known as ALV003, is an enzyme therapy designed to be taken with meals. GluteGuard has been shown to significantly protect celiac patients from the serious symptoms they would normally experience after gluten ingestion. There are other enzymes, including those based on papaya enzymes.

    Additionally, there are many celiac disease drugs, enzymes, and therapies in various stages of development by pharmaceutical companies, including at least one vaccine that has received financial backing. At some point in the not too distant future there will likely be new treatments available for those who seek an alternative to a lifelong gluten-free diet. 

    For now though, there are no products on the market that can take the place of a gluten-free diet. Any enzyme or other treatment for celiac disease is intended to be used in conjunction with a gluten-free diet, not as a replacement.

    ASSOCIATED DISEASES
    The most common disorders associated with celiac disease are thyroid disease and Type 1 Diabetes, however, celiac disease is associated with many other conditions, including but not limited to the following autoimmune conditions:
    Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus: 2.4-16.4% Multiple Sclerosis (MS): 11% Hashimoto’s thyroiditis: 4-6% Autoimmune hepatitis: 6-15% Addison disease: 6% Arthritis: 1.5-7.5% Sjögren’s syndrome: 2-15% Idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy: 5.7% IgA Nephropathy (Berger’s Disease): 3.6% Other celiac co-morditities include:
    Crohn’s Disease; Inflammatory Bowel Disease Chronic Pancreatitis Down Syndrome Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) Lupus Multiple Sclerosis Primary Biliary Cirrhosis Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis Psoriasis Rheumatoid Arthritis Scleroderma Turner Syndrome Ulcerative Colitis; Inflammatory Bowel Disease Williams Syndrome Cancers:
    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (intestinal and extra-intestinal, T- and B-cell types) Small intestinal adenocarcinoma Esophageal carcinoma Papillary thyroid cancer Melanoma CELIAC DISEASE REFERENCES:
    Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University
    Gluten Intolerance Group
    National Institutes of Health
    U.S. National Library of Medicine
    Mayo Clinic
    University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center