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    Cheerios Are Finally Going Gluten-Free


    Jefferson Adams
    Image Caption: Photo: Mike Mozart

    Celiac.com 02/25/2015 - General Mills has announced that original Cheerios, Honey Nut Cheerios and three other Cheerios varieties will undergo formula changes, including a switch to gluten-free oats, and will be released as a gluten-free cereal.


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    Photo: Mike MozartThe move by the food and cereal giant mirrors a similar recipe change that successfully boosted sales for its Chex brand, which has been gluten-free since 2010.

    The company will likely begin selling gluten-free versions in July, says Jim Murphy, president of Big G Cereals, General Mills' ready-to-eat cereal division.

    Apparently, General Mills felt that that could no longer ignore the skyrocketing sales of gluten-free foods, and the slow decline of foods that contain gluten, including breakfast cereals.

    "People are actually walking away from cereal because they are avoiding gluten," says Murphy, a development that, at a time when cereal sales, including Cheerios, are already weak, the company can ill afford.

    Meanwhile, unit sales growth of food with a gluten-free claim on its packaging grew 10.6% in 2014 compared to the previous year, and gluten-free sales, especially among breakfast cereals are expected to continue double-digit growth through at least 2018.

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    Guest Jana Schultz

    Posted

    Do we have any information about being processed with nuts?

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    Guest R SOSINSKI

    Posted

    It's about time, when will the others get on board?

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    Guest Colette

    Posted

    Cheerios is the first cereal I ate as a child and I ate them until I went gluten free 7 years ago. I can't wait to try them again!

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    Guest Craig

    Posted

    That's right cereals are NOT good for us everyday... Jam packed grains in a processed format, hmm, how delightful. Why support a brand that's so late to making ingredient changes and this is 100% directed at profits. Cheerios as a brand does not care about sustainability, their company mission doesn't care about celiac disease, auto-immune illnesses, and/or allergen-free lifestyles, nothing. We should be supporting brands who actually give a sh$$ and are innovating, by making our food healthier, tastier while contributing to the local farmers, and a greener ecosystem. I'm NOT buying Cheerios when there are alternatives on the market.

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    Guest dappy

    Posted

    Well it took them a while. I wrote to General Mills probably about two years ago and told them they were missing out by not converting cheerios. It's the most popular cereal by far.

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    Watchdog reported that Cheerios is NOT using certified gluten free oats and is in fact using a machine that removes the visible wheat and other grains from the bulk oats. Didn't sound safe for celiacs to me.

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    Guest Terry

    Posted

    Literally cheering for Cheerios this morning over this announcement!

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    Do we have any information about being processed with nuts?

    I would imagine that since one of the varieties is Honey Nut Cheerios, that if you've got nut allergies you'd be better off avoiding them.

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    Guest Lynne Sims

    Posted

    This is AWESOME news!!!

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    This is a fabulous announcement.

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    Guest Jeanne Foerch

    Posted

    It is great to have one more "on board" Gluten Free!

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    Guest Molly

    Posted

    Finally! I've been waiting 25 years for cereals to get on the gluten free train!!

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    Guest Linda M

    Posted

    So happy to hear this news. Cheerios was a staple until I knew I had celiac.

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    I love that Chex are good and the price is decent. I always use coupons as well. I'm hoping Cheerios are decent priced.

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    Very glad to hear Cheerios is going gluten free! I will definitely be trying them.

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    Guest Diana T.

    Posted

    It's about time, when will the others get on board?

    I agree. There are so many cereals out there that should be gluten-free but aren't--Kellogg's Cornflakes, Cocoa Krispies, Cap'n Crunch, Quaker Oatmeal, Cocoa Puffs, Reese's Peanut Butter Puffs, just to name a few. It makes no sense that these aren't gluten-free since their main ingredient is corn or rice.

     

    Is the 'malt flavoring' or whatever that represents only a trace amount of the ingredients really that necessary? I doubt it. Add Fiber One bars to the list, too. It should be relatively easy to make them gluten-free or at least offer a gluten-free version.

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    Guest Christy

    Posted

    This article from www.glutenfreewatchdog.org may be of interest: http://bit.ly/1Mka0fC

    Here's an excerpt from the article-I've had two conversations with General Mills, including one with a VP of Research and Development. She confirmed that gluten-free Cheerios are made using “high-quality†regular oats. General Mills claims that wheat and barley grain are removed from their oat supply by a proprietary mechanical process developed by engineers at General Mills (General Mills has reported elsewhere that they are using a mechanical filter). She went on to say that General Mills did not take the decision to produce gluten-free Cheerios lightly and that the process to develop this cereal has taken four years.

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    Guest Mary Aloi

    Posted

    This is the best news yet!!! I love Honey Nut Cherrios and have not been able to eat them since I was diagnosed with celiac disease in 2005

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    Guest Benny

    Posted

    Now if they will make Life cereal gluten-free I will be happy.

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    Guest D Moran

    Posted

    Excellent news I used too love Cheerios

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    Guest Robin

    Posted

    YAY! This is great news for cereal lovers. Wishing that more brands will get with the program too. Now if I could find a good soft bread, that would be even better news.

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    Guest Bobbi

    Posted

    I hope they use different equipment for the gluten free Cheerios not the same equipment used for cereals with gluten. I have a feeling this change is for the people who choose to be gluten free and not those of us with celiac disease.

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    Guest T Manahan

    Posted

    So happy, loved honey nut cheerios and haven't been able to eat them for a very long time. Nice to have a variety of cereals to choose from.

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    Guest Patti

    Posted

    So encouraging to see articles like this!!!

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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    Source:
    PLoS Med. 2018 Feb; 15(2): e1002507. doi:  10.1371/journal.pmed.1002507

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    Source:
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    SEC recently charged the now disgraced Holmes with what it called a 'years-long fraud.’ The company’s value has plummeted, and it is now nearly worthless, and facing dozens, and possibly hundreds of lawsuits from angry investors. Meantime, Theranos will pay Arizona consumers $4.65 million under a consumer-fraud settlement Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich negotiated with the embattled blood-testing company.
    Both investors and Arizona officials, “could have picked up on those things or asked more questions or kicked the tires more," Carreyrou said. Unlike other states, such as New York, Arizona lacks robust laboratory oversight that would likely have prevented Theranos from operating in those places, he added.
    Stay tuned for more new on how the Theranos fraud story plays out.
    Read more at azcentral.com.