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    Chick-fil-A Debuts New Gluten-free Sandwich Bun


    Jefferson Adams


    • Chicken chain Chic-fil-A has introduced a new gluten-free bun option.


    Image Caption: Chic-fil-A has introduced its new gluten-free bun. Photo: CC--M01229

    Celiac.com 07/07/2017 - Fast food chain Chic-fil-A chain has announced the launch of a gluten-free bun. This means that people with celiac disease can now enjoy something like the full Chick-fil-A experience.


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    Made from quinoa and amaranth, the 150-calorie buns will cost an extra $1.15, according to a report by Fortune magazine, which also noted that patrons must assemble the sandwich themselves to lessen the risk of cross-contamination.

    Still, this will likely come as welcome news to the multitudes of celiac sufferers, many of whom doubtless love the popular chicken purveyor.

    Chick-fil-A has gotten high marks recently, with website VeryWell.com naming Chick-fil-A as the fast-food chain with the best selection of gluten-free menu options.

    So, if you’re one of those gluten-free folks who has been waiting for your chance to enjoy the Chic-fil-A sandwich experience, your moment has arrived. Check in with a Chic-fil-A near you.

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    Guest Melisda

    Posted

    I have been to chik-fil-a twice since they released the gluten free bun and both times I was fine after eating it with no side effects. Side note: the sandwich was already assembled after I ordered. You may want to check with your local restaurant to see if they assemble or not and if they Will change their gloves to accommodate your allergy.

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    Guest Vickie

    Posted

    I won't be shopping Chick-Fil-A even with gluten free options...I don't like the way they fund groups that are anti LGBt! Rather of elsewhere and have just a meat burger or chicken sandwich!

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    Guest David

    Posted

    I don't care if they've started using gluten-free buns. My celiac might be OK, but I'd gag and choke on their homophobia. Hateful, bigoted, horrible people and they'll never get 1 CENT of my hard-earned GAY money!

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    Guest Jared M.

    Posted

    Wait. Use this bun for the grilled chicken? LOL Find me a celiac who misses the grilled chicken at Chick-Fil-A. You can get that same grilled chicken filet from any Sysco-supplied restaurant. It's the breaded chicken filet that made that place what it is. And as others have noted, I´d no longer patron a Chick-Fil-A for other reasons.

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    Guest Valerie

    Posted

    Woo Hoo! I am super excited that I and my daughter will be able to safely enjoy a MEAL at one of my families most favorite fast food restaurants!

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    Guest Candace

    Posted

    I would be truly interested in trying this sandwich if the chicken was not breaded with anything that contained lactose products as I also have that problem. It truly would be better than just going there and having only a lemonade. I appreciate this company as they support the troops and give discounts to anyone with military ID. I do not see any other fast food chain supporting our people protecting us.

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    Guest Laura

    Posted

    Yay! I've been waiting for a gluten free bun option for ages! Good for Chick-fil-a!! And for all of those people that don't want to support it, it's a free country, so do what you want, but please remember that this site is about gluten free options, not a political or idealist platform, so keep your complaints to yourself. Being a Christian doesn't mean being hateful.

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    I have been to chik-fil-a twice since they released the gluten free bun and both times I was fine after eating it with no side effects. Side note: the sandwich was already assembled after I ordered. You may want to check with your local restaurant to see if they assemble or not and if they Will change their gloves to accommodate your allergy.

    Thank you for the added information Melisda. I'm looking forward to visiting my local chik-fil-a!

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    Guest Amanda

    Posted

    Thank you Chick-Fil-A! We love your food. We have tried the gluten-free bun and it was great. We appreciate the great gluten free food and awesome dining experience - always professional and kind - no wonder the place is always packed all hours of the day!

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    Guest Brian

    Posted

    Vickie, more so David, the article had no political slant. You have the right to your beliefs and which business establishments you patronize, as I do to mine. So I'll say that most employees are extremely friendly and polite, more so than most other fast food chains. I look forward to trying a chicken sandwich with a gluten-free bun.

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    Guest Sharon Jepson

    Posted

    I had one the first week they came out with them. I find the bun to make the sandwich extremely dry and I could not finish it. The tomato was there along with the lettuce but there was no thousand island dressing to place on the sandwich which would have greatly helped the dryness so I had to use a packaged mayonnaise which was terrible. The best was very thing and the sandwich hard to eat as there was no meant but mostly bread. No dressing to place on the top and that makes any sandwich dryer when you have nothing to put on it. I would never but another gluten free sandwich there because there is no sauce for it. Learn a lesson from this and as much as I admire Chic Fill A for trying we have to have some kind of sauce to go on an extremely sandwich ad not just your packaged same ole stuff. Give us a break and find a thousand island ace or ranch sauce we can put on top of our sandwich or else it will not survive. I mean we want to feel normal like everyone else when eating at Chick Fill A but unless Chick Fill A can come up with a secret sauce then this is all in vain. the sandwich is way too dry without it. Gluten free breads are dry to start with and eating that sandwich without nothing is next to impossible.

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    They are still funding anti-gay causes including $200,000 in 2015 to a group that helps transform "troubled" youth. They may do as they please but they won't get my dollars to help them.

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    Sorry homophobic small minded businesses won't be getting any of my money. As someone who is super sensitive to any gluten I would be apprehensive to eat here in the first place, but their stance on gay rights leaves me sick to my stomach without even having visited their restaurant.

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    Guest CJ Russell

    Posted

    I don't care if they've started using gluten-free buns. My celiac might be OK, but I'd gag and choke on their homophobia. Hateful, bigoted, horrible people and they'll never get 1 CENT of my hard-earned GAY money!

    The owner of the company has a personal opinion. Everyone is entitled to an opinion, even business owners! The company does not discriminate based on sexual orientation. My grandson's uncle and his husband work for Chick-fil-A. They are openly gay and openly married. They are treated well and are given raises, bonuses, etc., just like any other employee. Customers are not turned away or treated poorly because of their sexual orientation, either. The company does not base it's treatment of the LBGT community on a personal opinion.

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    Guest Andrew

    Posted

    This is great news. I never eat chick fill a or at many other fast food places because so few gluten-free options. Glad to see the choices are increasing. Amazing these "tolerant" people are so intolerant of others beliefs, I guess only if they agree with it...I fully support chick fill a and what they stand for.

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    Guest Christine

    Posted

    I just have to remember to order the grilled fillet not fried since the fried version may have been cooked in wheat based flour... defeating the whole purpose of eating gluten free. I have Celiac and so does my mom and we share a lot of info and recipes. Thanks!

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    Guest Sybil Nassau

    Posted

    Before you get everyone all excited about this new bun, you might first warn people that not all the franchises adhere to the corporate policies/training and do NOT offer a gluten-free option. Apparently, it seems many of the employees are not even aware they are supposed to do this but not even the managers. If you don't believe me go to gluten free on FB and check out the hundreds of complaints registered about this chain. Some do report success but it seems most do not. Besides which, I wouldn't eat there if it was free also because of their homophobic policies. That is a choice we can make.

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    Guest jerry

    Posted

    Will try them out to support them.

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    Guest Bobby New

    Posted

    I won't be shopping Chick-Fil-A even with gluten free options...I don't like the way they fund groups that are anti LGBt! Rather of elsewhere and have just a meat burger or chicken sandwich!

    Everyone should praise Chick-Fil-A for standing by its Christian Beliefs. Christians damn the Sin of Homosexuality but forgive the Sinner. My family proudly supports Ch.ick-Fil-A for standing by its Christian beliefs.

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    Guest corine peck

    Posted

    Glad to hear. We love you and will definitely be by to try the gluten-free sandwich. So many need choices and thanks for improving your menu. Excellent to have another option. Thanks again!!!!! God bless you and your company.

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    Won't eat it unless I have a complete ingredient list. This press release says it's "made FROM quinoa and amaranth" and others say it's "made WITH premium ingredients like quinoa and amaranth" -- neither offer a complete ingredient list. Gluten-free often means mostly potato or corn flour. Yuck.

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    Guest Joanna Davis

    Posted

    I went to a newly opened Chick Fil A and asked the manager for a complete list of ingredients. He did comply. However, I asked for the grilled gluten free sandwich and was told that all their grilled chicken was marinated. I asked for a list of the ingredients in the marinade, he complied. I took a chance and was sick and bloated 2 hours later. Explosive diarrhea all day today. I added no sauce that I was given as it contained Maltodextrin, the gluten. Must have been cross contamination. False advertising that this sandwich is safe for celiacs. Chick fil a will be hearing from me!

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    I went to a newly opened Chick Fil A and asked the manager for a complete list of ingredients. He did comply. However, I asked for the grilled gluten free sandwich and was told that all their grilled chicken was marinated. I asked for a list of the ingredients in the marinade, he complied. I took a chance and was sick and bloated 2 hours later. Explosive diarrhea all day today. I added no sauce that I was given as it contained Maltodextrin, the gluten. Must have been cross contamination. False advertising that this sandwich is safe for celiacs. Chick fil a will be hearing from me!

    Maltodextrin is made from corn and is gluten-free.

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    Jefferson Adams is a freelance writer living in San Francisco. He has covered Health News for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com. His work has appeared in Antioch Review, Blue Mesa Review, CALIBAN, Hayden's Ferry Review, Huffington Post, the Mississippi Review, and Slate, among others.

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    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.