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  • Sheila Hughes
    Sheila Hughes

    Could Gluten be Ruining Your Skin?

    Caption: Photo: CC--kthrn

    Celiac.com 05/10/2013 - Many people struggle daily with skin problems. Everyone wants clear, healthy, radiant skin, but only few are willing to go the extra mile to achieve this. Out of the people who combine a healthy diet with skin care products for clearer skin, there are still some that just can't get it to clear up.

    Photo: CC--kthrnRecent studies are showing that many skin issues such as blemishes, eczema, or acne are caused by food allergies, and the top allergen in question? Gluten!

    Gluten can be found in roughly eighty percent of the proteins which grains contain. It is found in every day foods such as pizza, pasta, cereal, and even beer. Luckily in today's modern world we have many alternative foods, which are labeled gluten-free. Only a fraction of our population suffers a severe gluten-triggered autoimmune condition known as celiac disease. Many others are just intolerant or sensitive.

    The connection between gluten and our skin is its allergic response. Anytime our bodies have any sort of allergy the natural response is always inflammation. Inflammation can show itself in a number of ways on the skin. A few examples of allergic response are acne, eczema, or dermatitis. Along with the skin allergy, people with gluten sensitivity may experience some of many digestive issues that prevent our body from absorbing essential nutrients.

    It can be hard to diagnose a gluten allergy or sensitivity and many people have to remove gluten from their diet to see if their condition improves. If they do improve, they must continue to live a gluten free lifestyle to maintain healthy, radiant skin. More and more grocery stores are beginning to carry gluten free products, making it a little easier for those with a gluten intolerance. So maybe if you can't figure out why your skin looks the way it looks, it might be time to try a gluten elimination diet!

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    I had a rash behind my ears in the few years preceding my blood test diagnosis. I had tried probably 10 different products, even veterinary products, but it turned out to be gluten. I now consider irritations behind my ears my "accidental ingestion gluten meter". Within a week of stopping gluten my needing washed at least every other day or it was very oily hair, I am in my 50's, and hair usually gets less oily at that age, no longer was near as oily. And problem skin is better. My restless legs also got much better, although I find caffeine also a major restless legs contributor.

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  • About Me

    Born and raised in Northern California, I am an out going, adventurous individual. I've studied English at Santa Rosa Junior College, and also a bit of business. Throughout my school years English has always been my favorite subject.

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    And he needs to be super strict in his gluten free diet! SUPER strict, not just low gluten. No cross contamination, NONE.  I am so sorry, there are no short cuts with the testing. It flat out sucks but there you have it.  Welcome to the forum!
    Hi TDZ, My understanding is the same, a full gluten challenge is needed for the DH diagnosis.  The method the use for DH is to take a skin biopsy from next to a lesion, not on it.  They check the biopsy for IgA antibodies. I don't know of any way to shortcut the process and avoid eating gluten to get tested.  There may be a test some  day that doesn't require it, but for now I don't think there are any out there. One thing he might not have tried is avoiding iodine.  Some of the m
    Hello, new here and new to the whole thing! My husband has been battling this rash and assorted digestive issues for years. He was diagnosed with contact dermatitis by the dermatologist, had some steroid injections and various creams over the last couple of years, and then in November he went to the ER and they said eczema and gave him steroid pills. This was after a huge bloom that pretty much hit him from head to toe, where it had been mostly arms and legs before. He finally concluded he
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