Jump to content
  • Sign Up
  • Join our community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Latest Topics

  • 3 3

    Could Gluten-Free Eating Leave You Alone and Misjudged?

    Jefferson Adams
    • A new survey paints a grim dating picture for gluten-free eaters.

    Could Gluten-Free Eating Leave You Alone and Misjudged?
    Caption: Have you had a bad experience on a date due to your gluten-free diet? Image: CC--Stuart Webster

    Celiac.com 10/23/2018 - As if being on a gluten-free diet for medical reasons weren’t hard enough already, with it’s numerous logistical and social challenges, now comes a new study that spells out the thoughts of the general public about gluten-free dieters, and the picture it paints isn’t pretty.

    Nearly half of people who responded to a recent survey said that they would judge someone on a gluten-free diet as "selfish, demanding and difficult to please." Another 44 percent say that people who eat a gluten-free diet are "high maintenance," while more than 30 percent call gluten-free eaters "selfish" and 14 percent presume they must be "arrogant." When it comes to questions of dating, More than 40 percent of those surveyed would be reluctant to date someone who was gluten-free, while 10 percent of respondents feared that they would be judged poorly by their gluten-free date.  

    The study by researchers from Western Connecticut State University is the first study of its kind. In it, researchers asked 161 adults if they would date somebody who is gluten-free. Most participants expressed reservations bout dating people on a gluten-free diet.

    Researchers had another group of 132 people participate in an online dating scenario in which they were told to "imagine going on a first date with an individual who discloses adhering to a gluten-free diet." Participants then rated their prospective date on factors such as perceived kindness, mood, pickiness, and femininity or masculinity. Interestingly, women on a gluten-free diet were perceived to be more feminine.

    Some participants claimed they would be more understanding if a person cut out gluten due to an allergy rather than just as part of a fad diet.

    The good news is that six percent of those surveyed view gluten-free eaters as "understanding," while three percent see them as "happy," "energetic," and "self-disciplined." 

    Its unclear how closely the results of this particular survey reflect the sentiments of the general public, but you can read more results in the DailyMail.com.

    3 3


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    Lately, half the people in pretty much any survey are insular and/or stupid.  The internet gives so much information that is consumed so quickly (scroll those headlines) that people feel entitled to be utterly judgmental about something they know virtually nothing about.

    I stick a loaf of gluten free bread on the roller at the supermarket and can almost smell the sniffs of folks in line.   Would someone buying, say, Depends need to feel the need to defend the choice?

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    9 hours ago, Auldtwa said:

    Lately, half the people in pretty much any survey are insular and/or stupid.  The internet gives so much information that is consumed so quickly (scroll those headlines) that people feel entitled to be utterly judgmental about something they know virtually nothing about.

    I stick a loaf of gluten free bread on the roller at the supermarket and can almost smell the sniffs of folks in line.   Would someone buying, say, Depends need to feel the need to defend the choice?

    I get that judgemental look, when I check out also. I just list off my conditions and it changes to empathy, then I pass off with a joke or statement about it making me a good cook, or health benefits.

    -_- I will admit with all my issues GI wise ontop of the issues with my Autism, I would rate myself as high maintenance and seemingly arrogant.
    Selfish and demanding.....uh yeah to a extent, I feel wronged by the world and life. You get multiple AI diseases and have a VERY limited diet you feel like your owed something in life to make up for the freedoms lost and how you have to be treated special. Logically I know it is wrong and no ones fault but I am envious and hold a slight grudge against normal people and feel like I need to be compensated for my life being turned upside down by my health issues. DO note these feelings have been diminishing over the years as acceptance moves.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Guest Laura

    Posted

    Rules for living happily gluten-free with my significant other (SO):

    1. No gluten products allowed in the house

    2. Do not, at any time lecture on, or inhibit my SO from enjoying gluten-laden foods outside of the house.

    3. I will sit & nurse my iced-tea with a smile and share in happy conversation while my SO devours glutenous foods.

    4. My SO will place all bread baskets to the far right side of the table & cover it with a napkin.

    5. My SO will be patient & laugh along with my gluten jokes when ads for glutenized food play during televised programs. Like: How about a little meat with that fried gluten sandwich? 

    6. Do not permit discussions on food prices or costs while shopping. Americans spend upwards of $2K on snack & fast foods, which celiacs cannot eat.  Therefore, I will buy as many grass-fed & tender meats each week as desired.

    As far as arrogant gluten-reaction naysayers go:

    When annoyed at receiving gluten remarks just describe in 'graphic' detail the hours you spend on the toilet with foul smelling explosive diarrhea with each exposure. They turn their tails & run! Ha!

     

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com.

    Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book Dangerous Grains by James Braly, MD and Ron Hoggan, MA.

×