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    Could Gluten-Free Food Be Hurting Your Dog?


    Jefferson Adams
    • The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Center for Veterinary Medicine, along with a group of veterinary diagnostic laboratories, is investigating the possible link between DCM and pet foods.

    Could Gluten-Free Food Be Hurting Your Dog?
    Image Caption: Image: CC--angela n.

    Celiac.com 08/15/2018 - Grain-free food has been linked to heart disease in dogs. A canine cardiovascular disease that has historically been seen in just a few breeds is becoming more common in other breeds, and one possible culprit is grain-free dog food. 

    The disease in question is called canine dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), and often results in congestive heart failure. DCM is historically common in large dogs such as Great Danes, Newfoundlands, Irish Wolfhounds, Saint Bernards and Doberman Pinschers, though it is also affects some Cocker Spaniels.  Numerous cases of DCM have been reported in smaller dogs, whose primary source of nutrition was food containing peas, lentils, other legume seeds or potatoes as main ingredients. These reported atypical DCM cases included Golden and Labrador Retrievers, a Whippet, a Shih Tzu, a Bulldog and Miniature Schnauzers, as well as mixed breeds. 

    As a result, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's Center for Veterinary Medicine, along with a group of veterinary diagnostic laboratories, is investigating the possible link between DCM and pet foods containing seeds or potatoes as main ingredients. The good news is that in cases where the dog suffers no genetic component, and the disease is caught early, simple veterinary treatment and dietary change may improve heart function.

    According to Nutritional Outlook, an industry publication for makers of dietary supplements and healthy foods and beverages, there is a growing market for “free from” foods for dogs, especially gluten-free and grain-free formulations. In 2017, about one in five dog foods launched was gluten-free. So, do dogs really need to eat grain-free or gluten-free food? Probably not, according to PetMD, which notes that many pet owners are simply projecting their own food biases when choosing dog food.

    Genetically, dogs are well adapted to easily digest grains and other carbohydrates. Also, beef and dairy remain the most common allergens for dogs, so even dogs with allergies are unlikely to need to need grain-free food. 

    So, the take away here seems to be that most dogs don’t need grain-free or gluten-free food, and that it might actually be bad for the dog, not good, as the owner might imagine.

    Stay tuned for more on the FDA’s investigation and any findings they make.

    Read more at Bizjournals.com

     

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     "Numerous cases of DCM have been reported in smaller dogs, whose primary source of nutrition was food containing peas, lentils, other legume seeds or potatoes as main ingredients." In commercial kibble you need some filler, so if not grains, something even worse goes in the mix. Rule of thumb in my pack - the amount of grains fed is the exact amount that goes out the other way undigested. Same goes for legumes but who would feed their dogs legumes when feeding fresh diet, right? Not even vegans. 🙂

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    I have Celiac and I feed my dog a good quality dry dog food that happens to be grain free because I don't want to deal with gluten whenever I feed her, whenever she licks me, grooms herself or whatever.  Since the main starch in commercial dog foods seems to be soy or corn, I don't think she's missing much.  However, dog food is only about half of her diet.  She gets some of whatever we're having most of the time for a little variety.  (yes, before anyone speaks up, never onions, mostly meat but she does like pinto beans in chili, not black beans, just pintos.  :-) )  She's a healthy dog.

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    Let's be clear here that the issue is not lack of grains or gluten or too much protein that's causing this issue.  It is the filler/cheaper protein that the companies add by way of added legumes (chickpeas, lentils, peas, etc.) that is the cause of the heart disease. This means you must do your homework, read ingredients labels, and if needed, call the company. Some companies are transparent about what percentage of the protein in the dry kibble comes from non-meat sources, others not so much. For example, Merrick grain free foods state on bag that 70% of the protein used in their grain free kibble comes from meat sources, not grain or legumes. My rule of thumb is that the first 2-3 ingredients must be quality (no ambiguous 'by products etc.) meats or egg. So, consumer beware, do your homework, make the phone calls, etc. It's a crazy world out there. :>)

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    Guest stupified

    Posted

    The way this article is written makes it sound like dogs need grains to survive. That isn't true....they are carnivores. They never ate grain until the last century when dog food was introduced.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com.

    Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book Dangerous Grains by James Braly, MD and Ron Hoggan, MA.

  • Popular Contributors

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    Jefferson Adams
    Tainted Wheat Gluten Suspected in Pet Deaths
    Celiac.com 04/05/2007 - Recent news indicates that wheat gluten tainted with melamine, a chemical found in Asian fertilizers, and forbidden in American pet foods, has been implicated in the sickness of as many as 8,800 pets, including the deaths of up to 2,797 animals, mostly cats1 .
    Stephen Sundlof, director of the FDAs Center for Veterinary Medicine, stated that: The association between the melamine in the kidneys and urine of cats that died and the melamine in the food they consumed is undeniable," though he stopped short of placing blame for the animal deaths conclusively on the melamine-tainted wheat gluten.
    Sundlof did go on to say that melamine, in any amount, is not permitted in pet foods sold in the U.S.
    Wheat Gluten is Not Part of Your Pet's Natural Diet
    These stories invite a deeper consideration about the role that non-tainted wheat gluten may play in chronic illness and degenerative diseases in our beloved cats and dogs.
    The simple truth is that cats and dogs are, by nature, primarily meat eaters. Dogs are historically scavengers, whose natural diets, according to a recent study by biologists Ray and Lorna Coppinger, consisted of "bones, pieces of carcass, rotten greens and fruit, fish guts, discarded seeds and grains, animal guts and heads, some discarded human food and wastes"3. In the wild, a dogs diet included only the smallest amounts of grains, while cats are almost totally carnivorous, and subsist in the wild on a diet made up almost exclusively of small rodents. The natural diets of both cats and dogs provide large amounts of animal protein and fats, water, and little in the way of carbohydrates.
    Dogs and Cats Should Avoid Grains and Carbohydrates
    Most veterinary textbooks agree that both cats and dogs need almost no carbohydrates, yet the so called recommended diet of dry pet foods, which is a major component of most pets diets, contradicts both their natural diets and the veterinary literature. Many of these dry pet foods are high in carbohydrates, low in animal protein and fats, and contain almost no water.
    This fact is largely ignored by major pet food producers, which is also noted in the book Canine and Feline Nutrition, which states that "the nutrient content of most commercial foods includes carbohydrates"4.
    Many pet owners who feed canned, moist food to their cats and dogs do so believing that they are providing much-needed meat and moisture to their animals. This is largely true, but what is also true, as came to light in the recent spate of illnesses and deaths from tainted wet formula pet foods, is that wheat gluten is a significant ingredient in such foods.
    The problem is that the digestive systems of dogs and cats have not evolved to digest plant proteins like gluten—they are designed to digest animal protein, and gluten is not the same—and feeding these animals foods that contain gluten can result in many of the same problems that afflict their human counterparts who are sensitive to gluten.
    Toxic Effects of Wheat Gluten and Other Proteins in Pets...and Humans
    According to veterinarian John B. Symes (Dogtor J), gluten and other proteins that are added to dog and cat foods are causing many of the same diseases that they cause in their human counterparts. Dogs and cats that have suffered and died from consuming tainted pet food belie the fact that even untainted gluten can cause many of these same problems and more. In human celiacs and gluten-sensitive individuals, untainted gluten can induce both chronic and acute kidney failure. This form of kidney failure is typically called an IgA nephropathy, in which antibodies and immune complexes formed against gluten are deposited in the kidneys, which leads to damage and ultimately failure. Again, this can be chronic leading to persistent blood (microscopic) and protein in the urine or it can be acute.
    Dr. Symes claims that it is a startling but well-established fact that the lectins of gluten (wheat, barley, rye) dairy products (e.g. casein, lactalbumin) soy, and corn are all capable of inducing serious health issues in those humans who are sensitive to them. He takes this belief even further and states that such foods are actually not healthy for anyone—neither pets nor humans and they just happen to be more harmful to some individuals than others. According to him anyone who consumes or feeds these foods to their pets on a daily basis will encounter resulting health problems—it is only of matter of time.
    Dr. Symes believes that the onset of a lectin-related disorder—whether it be rheumatoid arthritis, type-one diabetes, lupus, etc.—is usually preceded by another event such as viral or bacterial infection. Vaccines can act as triggers as well. The result of such secondary events is a sudden influx and attachment of these inflammatory proteins to various cells in the body, ushering in what we often refer to as autoimmune disorders. That term implies an immune system that has gone haywire, attacking the body for no reason. According to him, our immune systems, along with those of our pets, never make that kind of mistake. These conditions happen for certain reasons, and these food proteins are often the cause.
    All one needs to do, according to Dr. Symes, is to study celiac disease to see how all of this works and appreciate the health implications that accompany this extremely common condition. That a similar condition does occur in dogs and cats has become painfully obvious during the past seven years that he has been studying the issue. Dr. Symes states: "The Irish Setter is a breed known to suffer from gluten intolerance, but it is clear that gluten is affecting many other breeds of dogs and cats. And why wouldnt it? It is affecting humans and we have had millennia to adapt to eating wheat. Our pets have only been eating wheat-based pet foods for about 20 years now."
    According to Dr. Symes it does not matter whether they ever tell us that tainted wheat gluten caused kidney failure, or that it be proven responsible in these pet deaths. The fact is that wheat gluten, tainted or not, can, and does cause and/or contribute to these conditions. Thus, according to Dr. Symes, gluten should never end up in pet foods.
    To illustrate his theory Dr. Symes points out that the average American dog lives 12 years—13 for cats, when their wild counterparts, eating a natural diet, can live to be nearly thirty and t forty years respectively. For the cause, we need look no further than what we put in their bowls. A European study shows that pets fed with table scraps lived an average of three years longer than those fed commercial diets alone. Why? The answer, at least in part, is that highly processed foods cannot possibly contain all of the essential nutrients found in fresh meats, fruits and vegetables.
    Reasons for Your Pets to Avoid Gluten
    For all of the reasons stated, its probably a good practice to keep wheat gluten and carbohydrates away from you pet in favor of a "natural" diet rich in animal protein and fats and low in (or free of) carbohydrates. As specialty foods can be expensive, a list of readily available pet foods that are free of wheat gluten is provided below.
    Avoid senior, light and diet foods, as they contain increased fiber and carbohydrates and reduced protein and fat, compared to adult maintenance diets. This is the opposite of what they really need, and this food has no scientific foundation. Older and overweight pets usually respond well to increased protein and fats gained through a diet rich in meat, not grains.
    Another benefit of this approach is that many dogs on the dangerous non-steroidal and steroid drugs so commonly prescribed for dogs may see marked improvements in their conditions and, in fact, may no longer need such drugs, which tend to shorten dogs lives. Many owners who feed their pets fewer grains see less inflammation.
    Top 10 Pet Foods that are Free of Gluten and Other Potentially Harmful Proteins
    The following pet foods are recommended by John B. Symes, D.M.V., and according to him, none are ideal, but each is gluten-free, wheat-free, barley-free, dairy-free and soy-free and can produce miraculous results in treating chronic diseases that are now found in many pets:
    IVD/Royal Canin - L.I.D.s (potato-based diets) Nutro Natural Choice Lamb and Rice NaturalLife Lambaderm Canidae and Felidae- Dog and cat foods Dick Van Patten Natural Balance Duck and Potato, Venison and Brown Rice, and Sweet Potato and Fish Formulas Solid Gold Barking at the Moon Natura California Naturals Canine Caviar Lamb & Pearl Millet and Chicken & Pearl Millet formulas Eagle Pack Holistic Select®Duck Meal & Oatmeal and Lamb Meal & Rice Formulas Eukanuba Response KO and FP Resources:
    Your Whole Pet - Bigger than you think: The story behind the pet food recall (http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/g/a/2007/04/03/petscol.DTL&feed=rss.news) Coppinger, Ray and Lorna, Dogs: A Startling New Understanding of Canine Origin, Behavior & Evolution, Scribner, 2001. 59 -- 78. Case: Cary, and Hirakawa, Canine and Feline Nutrition, Mosby, 1995. 93. Morris, Mark, Lewis, Lone and Hand, Michael, Small Animal Clinical Nutrition III, Mark Morris Associates, 1990. 1-11. Burger, I., Ed. The Waltham Book of Companion Animal Nutrition, Pergamon 1995. 26-27: 10. Symes, D.M.V., Dr. John B. (Dogtor J) www.dogtorj.net

    Destiny Stone
    Pets and the Gluten-Free Diet
    Celiac.com 05/27/2010 - People don't generally think that the food they feed their pets not only affects their pets, but also impacts their lives as well. Going gluten-free in my house also meant going gluten-free for my pets. Your pets can't tell you if something is wrong. Just like my doctors had no idea that my problems were related to gluten, my veterinarian certainly would never suggest that my dog is gluten-intolerant! It is up to us as pet owners to realize that reoccurring health problems in our pets, could be an indication of  food intolerance's.
    Deciding to put my pets on a gluten-free diet was not a hard decision to make. My two year old lab/mix, Maya was constantly getting eye infections, which my vet disregarded as environmental allergies. The problem was she had allergies year round and was getting eye infections once a month-which we treated with antibiotics, and benadryl. My vet did not recommend dietary changes for my dog, but I took charge and decided to try a gluten-free diet anyway.
    Since putting Maya on a gluten-free diet, she has not had a single eye infection. She still has mild seasonal allergies, but nothing like she had when she was eating gluten-based dog food. Through my research I found that the first ingredient in dog and cat  food should be meat-which makes sense since they are carnivores. However, most pet food I found (including my previous “grain-free”pet food) listed the first ingredients as a grain; either oats, wheat, barley or rice.
    I recently had my cat tested for parasites. The results were that he had parasites from grain based foods. The vet told me that the parasites were harmless, but as long as I fed my cat grain-based foods, he would continue to test positive for intestinal mites. I switched his food to gluten-free immediately following his vet visit.  Since switching to a gluten-free/grain-free food for my pets, I have seen a huge improvement in all my pets overall health an well-being.
    Aside from the obvious health benefits for my pets, gluten-free food is also better for you. Now that my pets are all eating gluten-free diets, I no longer have to worry so much about possible cross-contamination from touching their food. I can now get slobbery kisses from my dogs worry free. I also no longer worry about washing my dog and cats food dishes in the same sink or with the same sponge as I use for my other dishes.
    Research  is the most important thing to do when looking for a gluten-free pet food.  There are quite a few grain-free options on the market, but be careful, 'grain-free' does not necessarily mean 'gluten-free'; contacting the manufacturer can help to dispel any concerns. Most commercial pet stores do not carry gluten-free pet food options. I found more gluten-free options at the mom and pop pet store I usually frequent. I did a lot of Internet research and talked to my local pet store endlessly to find the right product for my pets. However, you may need to special order your pet food through your pet store, or online. It is also important to introduce new foods to your pets gradually. It is always advised to mix your old food with the new food when first introduced. Ask your veterinarian what the best practice is for introducing new foods to your pets.
     It is also important to find out about product recalls, so as to avoid buying products that have been contaminated. The following link for the FDA  has current and updated information regarding product recalls for pet food and pet food products.

    FDA Pet Food Recalls Gluten-Free Pet Treats
    Many pet treats contain wheat as the first ingredient. When shopping for gluten-free pet treats, the best place to look is in products that are made entirely of meat. Dried chicken or duck strips for example are a wonderful gluten-free option. However, watch out for are any added filler ingredients-it's best to buy products with no fillers. Caution is also important when it comes to the manufacturing of  your pet food. I bought 100% pure duck strips for my dogs, but they both got diarrhea shortly after eating a couple of the treats. After looking more closely at the product, I realized that the ingredients were manufactured in China. I immediately tossed those treats and bought new treats that were made in USA-my dogs no longer have any problems. Trader Joe's also  carries some inexpensive gluten-free dog treats. However, if you do a Google search for gluten-free pet treats, you will see an endless list of possibilities. Making your own gluten-free dog treats is pretty easy. The following link will take you to some easy gluten-free pet treat recipes.
    Gluten-Free Pet Treat Recipes Gluten-Free Pet Supplies
    Some of the other, less obvious sources of gluten in your pets life can be found in the supplements and care products that you use. Check the ingredients for hidden "gluten" and contact the manufacturers whenever necessary. Keep your hands clean before and after applying any medications or products to your pets that contain gluten. I recently bought some pad moisturizure for Maya's cracked paws and realized the ingredients contained tocopherols -which could contain gluten. Before applying greasy gluten to your pets paws (which would be like asking them to finger-paint with gluten all over your home), contact the manufacturer to determine if all ingredients are gluten-free.Hairball Medicine
    I was using a fur ball gel for my cat. The gel requires me to administer it by putting a big glob on my cats paw, so he can lick it off. After reading the ingredients more carefully, I realized that I was putting a big glob of glutenous gel directly on my cat, and incidentally, on myself. If you use a fur-ball gel or any supplements that require you to get them on your hands, you will want to make sure they are gluten-free, or at least clean your hands thoroughly after using. Of course, if you are anything like me and you don't want to get gluten anywhere on your body, use a paper towel. Paper towels have been a blessing for me. I often use paper towels to create a barrier between me and possible gluten contamination. Simply put the hair ball gel on a bunched up paper towel and apply the gel to your pet-the gluten glob never has to touch your skin. There is also  a hairball gel capsule that you can give to your pets (mine refuses to eat them, but many pets like them), which doesn't involve you getting messy with a glutenous gel. Also, brushing your pet regularly will reduce the likelihood of them getting fur-balls. So find the right brush for your pet and try to incorporate brushing into your daily routine.
    Shampoos and Soaps
    Many pet shampoos and soaps, like people shampoos and soaps, contain gluten. Try to find a shampoo or soap that doesn't have any gluten ingredients if possible.  I use a tea-tree castile soap on my pets. Castile is naturally gluten-free and  is a gentle alternative to some of the harsh pet shampoos and soaps with unpronounceable ingredients I usually find on the market. If you can't use a gluten-free shampoo, make sure to rinse your pets very well and wash your hands thoroughly after bathing your pet.
    Toothpaste
    Most veterinarians recommend brushing your pets teeth at least three times per week. If you cannot brush their teeth for any reason, you should get their teeth cleaned professionally 1-2 times per year. Professional cleanings are much more expensive than brushing at home, so yes, I brush my pets teeth. Many pet toothpaste gels contain gluten. Obviously, finding a gluten-free toothpaste is ideal, however if that is not an option make sure to wash your hands thoroughly after coming into contact with any gluten containing products.
    Gluten-Free Quick Check:

    Use gluten-free pet food Use a gluten-free toothpaste Make homemade gluten-free pet treats Use a gluten-free hairball gel Wash your hands often

    Jefferson Adams
    Novak Djokovic Puts Dog on Gluten-free 'Fitness' Diet
    Celiac.com 10/11/2013 - World No.1 tennis player Novak Djokovic credits a gluten-free diet with strong improvement in his performance and his success on the court.
    Now, word comes that Djokovic has got his pet dog eating gluten-free, as well. In 'Serve To Win', Djokovic's book about his gluten-free diet, he writes of a marked improvement in his health and well-being since he discovered his intolerance to gluten, and began eating gluten-free.
    According to Djokovic, he has even put his dog, Pierre, on a gluten-free diet, and the dog has also become more healthy.
    Dogs can, in fact, react to gluten in pet food. You can read more about that in an earlier article, Gluten and Toxins in Pet Foods: Are they Poisoning Your Pets?
    The article discusses gluten in pet foods, and the questionable role in canine diets.
    So, maybe Djokovic is making a sensible choice and his dog is reaping the benefits of a gluten-free canine diet. What do you think? Is it crazy to put a dog on a gluten-free diet, or could it be good for the dog? Share your comments below.
    Source:
    http://www.aninews.in/newsdetail6/story128099/-039-diet-obsessed-039-djokovic-puts-pet-dog-on-gluten-free-regime-for-fitness-.html

    Jefferson Adams
    Is the Global Gluten-free Pet Food Market Set to Explode?
    Celiac.com 08/04/2017 - Industry analysts are projecting the global market for gluten-free pet foods to enjoy growth of up to 25% a year over the next decade. Across numerous industries, a shift from products containing gluten to gluten-free products is creating major potential for manufacturers.
    The latest market report from Persistence Market Researchers, titled Global Gluten-free Pet Food Market: Drivers and Restraints, projects double-digit growth in gluten-free pet food markets through 2025.
    The report offers market information and analysis on all segments of the global gluten-free pet food market broken down by type, flavor, specification, form, and distribution channel. Types include natural and added additives, while flavor types are further divided into chicken, beef, fish, and other red meat and white meats.
    Specification covers the type of pet, such as food for cats, for dogs, for birds, for pocket animals, and others. The report breaks down each of these categories.
    In terms of distribution channel, the global gluten-free pet food market report includes information on e-commerce, supermarkets, retail shops, exclusive pet shops, and others. Form type includes information on dry and wet pet food market segments.
    Gluten-free pet food is a new segment in the pet food industry, and has strong potential to displace regular pet foods.
    North America currently leads the world in gluten-free pet food production. Currently, there are no gluten-free pet food manufacturers in Europe.
    Meanwhile, North America and Europe are currently the largest consumers of gluten-free pet food products followed by Asia Pacific.
    A Sample of this Report is Available Upon Request at: PersistenceMarketResearch.com

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    • Victoria, It can be.  Up to 40% of Celiac's have some Neurologic/Psychriatric issues. Here is the research on the anxiety and depression issues common in celiac's entitled "Neurologic and Psychiatric Manifestations of Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity" https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3641836/ I used to have terrible anxiety (un-natural anxiety) almost to the point of a panic attack. Taking Zinc lozenges (they self regulate) with a metalic taste in your mouth helped many of my anxiety issues. Later (or around the same time I cant remember now) I learned magnesium and B-Vitamins could also help. Taking a B-complex as I think Ennis_tx mentioned (in another thread) and taking Magnesium Citrate helped many of my depression issues. Here is a good article that explains some of the vitamins/minerals that some one can take that can help anxiety and depression issues entitled "The Role of Vitamins and Minerals in Psychiatry" https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3046018/ I hope this is helpful but it is not medical advice. Low Iron is also common (IDA) in celiac's and has been shown to be associated with panic attacks. Here is the research on low Iron and B-6 entitled "Low serum concentrations of vitamin B6 and iron are related to panic attack and hyperventilation attack" https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23603926 I didn't know any of this then.  But it is not all in your head as doctor's some times are prone to say. The anxiety is real! Again I hope this is helpful and good luck on your continued journey. There is hope I used to be you!  Waking up on the "wrong side" of the bed. . . days in a row never knowing why? At least you know how gluten is effecting you or are at least right to suspect it and you can avoid it. . . . And sometimes just avoiding the issue once you have identified it is easier than dealing with the after math. And why would you want too anyway? It is not all in your head!  Be your own advocate! Note/Remeber the research was on the "Neurologic and Psychiatric Manifestations of Celiac Disease and Gluten Sensitivity"  which you seem to have.  You don't need to be full blown (officially) diagnosed celiac for gluten to affect you poorly as you are noticing. Again I hope this is helpful but this is not medical advice just some of the things I found helped me.  And if they help you.  Pay it forward and tell others. I wish I knew some of these things years and years ago as many of us do on this forum and why we still participate/share our experiences to help those still looking for answers sadly we had to find out on our own too often! 2 Timothy 2: 7  “Consider what I say; and the Lord give thee understanding in all things” this included Posterboy by the grace of God,
    • Hi Victoria! Consider getting retested for celiac disease provided you are still eating gluten daily.  Children of celiacs should be retested every few years even if they have no obvious symptoms.   https://www.gluten.org/branchnews/relatives-tested-celiac-disease/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24552206
    • Hi, I wanted to submit some new info on the altoids smalls. They have been banned previously by celiacs due to wheat maltodextrin listed as an ingredient. However, I just noticed that on their tin, there the wheat maltodextrin is no longer listed in the ingredients. So, I wrote to wrigley's asking about that. Here's the replyi received: "Thanks for taking the time to contact the Wrigley Company.  We really care about your questions and feedback. We had changed the formula with in the last couple years were we took the wheat maltodextrin out of the Altoids Smalls Mints. If the old tin you have says wheat maltodextrin it would be the old formula. If you have any additional questions or comments feel free to contact us at 1-800-WRIGLEY (974-4539)  Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. CST or visit us at www.wrigley.com." I thought that was great. But I wrote them again because I was still wondering about any other gluten possibly hiding in there. Here's their response: "Thanks for taking the time to contact the Wrigley Company.  We really care about your questions and feedback. We are not using any oats, rye, barley, gluten or wheat in the Altoids Smalls Mints. The tin will not say gluten free on them. Because the ingredients are not tested or certified as gluten free. The only two products that have ever been certified gluten free are our Skittles Candy and Starburst Candy. Which you will see the gluten free statement on the outer packaging. If you have any additional questions or comments feel free to contact us at 1-800-WRIGLEY (974-4539)  Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. CST or visit us at www.wrigley.com." So it sounds like they are most likely ok now, except for the most sensitive of us. Just thought I'd share the info. 
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