• Join our community!

    Do you have questions about celiac disease or the gluten-free diet?

  • Ads by Google:
     




    Get email alerts Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

    Ads by Google:



       Get email alertsSubscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter

  • Member Statistics

    77,369
    Total Members
    3,093
    Most Online
    Tesy
    Newest Member
    Tesy
    Joined
  • 0

    Gluten-Detecting Dogs


    Tina Turbin

    Celiac.com 02/07/2011 - Maintaining a diet completely free of gluten can be a challenge for celiac disease patients, especially when it comes to avoiding cross-contamination. Currently there is only one treatment for celiac disease, an autoimmune reaction caused by exposure to gluten, a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye—and this treatment is the elimination of gluten from the diet. Despite our best efforts, gluten can sneak its way into our food, making us quite ill. While home testing kits are available to test food for gluten, these can be an inconvenience when dining out and can only detect 10 ppm of gluten or more. A recent article published by USA Today has made waves in the gluten-free world, making us aware of another method of testing for gluten—using gluten-detecting dogs.


    Ads by Google:




    ARTICLE CONTINUES BELOW ADS
    Ads by Google:



    The article featured Hollie Scott and her dog, two-year-old Elias, a Beaceron who is also an AKG Grand Champion. Hollie Scott is a celiac whose reaction to gluten is particularly serious; even just the tiniest amount of the substance in her food can give her the symptoms of a severe stomach flu for several weeks. Scott attends the University of Missouri, where her dog attends classes and social functions with her and keeps her company at restaurants and on buses, trains, and airplanes.

    Elias was trained in Slovenia over the course of many weeks for his gluten detection training. Now he has the capability of detecting gluten in all sorts of hot and cold foods.  According to USA Today, “Teaching a dog to be alert to the scent of gluten is much more complicated than most scent-detection training, because gluten comes in so many forms.” Gluten can appear in bread and cereal products and can be processed in many different ways. It can also appear in less obvious products as binders or thickeners, in foods such as salad dressing and even in products such as Play-doh and lipstick.

    How does Elias do his job? Scott places a cover punctured with holes over the item while Elias sniffs it. Scott also practices with him on a daily basis, giving him gluten-containing items to test for her. When Elias detects gluten, he pulls the item away, and if there’s nothing to worry about, he looks away. Getting a gluten-detection dog may not be an option for many of us celiacs, but vigilantly reading labels, contacting companies, and clearly communicating with servers, chefs, and hosts can greatly reduce the risk of cross-contamination. Another option is a testing kit such as EZ Gluten® by ELISA Technologies, which is sensitive enough to detect 10 ppm in your food. Unfortunately, as USA Today says, “even hyper-vigilance isn't a 100% guarantee.” If you are particularly sensitive to gluten, as is Scott, getting a gluten-detection dog may be a smart idea. Perhaps in the future, gluten-detection dogs may be more widely used.

    With an increase in research and awareness, we have not only witnessed an increase in celiac disease diagnosis, but also several advancements, for instance the availability of products such as home gluten testing kits, home celiac testing kits, and gluten-digesting enzyme formulas, which have all contributed toward making gluten-free living less of a challenge. Gluten-detecting dog training is yet another advancement, which I hope will have a positive impact on the lives of severe celiac cases such as Hollie Scott.  

    Resources:


    0


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There is also a German Shorthair that is trained on finding gluten in foods, make up, and trace amounts. Look her up at noseydogdetectionpartners.com

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

    Guest
    You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Popular Contributors

  • Ads by Google:

  • Who's Online   7 Members, 0 Anonymous, 911 Guests (See full list)

  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/14/2010 - Most people with celiac disease will tell you that faithfully maintaining a gluten-free diet can be very challenging, especially for those who enjoy dining out or in the homes of friends.
    "Going to restaurants or dinner at a friend's house can pose dangers to a person with celiac disease," says said Dr. Ali Keshavarzian, vice chairman of medicine and gastroenterologist at Rush University Medical Center. "It can really impact a person's quality of life."
    For most people, maintaining a gluten-free diet will stop symptoms, heal existing intestinal damage, and prevent further damage, along with potentially preventing numerous associated conditions, such as diabetes. But setting up and sticking to a gluten-free diet can be a challenge.
    A team of Gastroenterologists at Rush have designed a new study to determine if mind and body techniques could help people with celiac disease adhere to the very strict diet.
    "Eating even a small amount of gluten can damage the small intestine," says Dr. Ali Keshavarzian, vice chairman of medicine and gastroenterologist at Rush. "The damage will occur in anyone with the disease, including people without noticeable symptoms."
    Hidden sources of gluten are sometimes additives such as modified food starch, preservatives and stabilizers made with wheat. Also, numerous corn and rice products made in factories that also make wheat products can be contaminated with wheat gluten.
    "The purpose of this study is to determine whether participation in one of two mind/body courses can help patients cope with the restricted diet," says Keshavarzian. "It can be very hard and stressful for people with celiac disease to stick to a gluten-free diet."
    Healing existing intestinal damage and preventing further damage means that people with celiac disease must go on a lifelong gluten-free diet. Patients must be trained by health professionals on how to understand safe and unsafe ingredient on food labels, and to spot foods containing gluten in order to make safer, more effective choices when grocery shopping or eating out.
    People with celiac disease or gluten intolerance usually begin to feel better within days of starting a gluten-free diet.
    The small intestine usually heals in three- to six-months in children, but can take several years in adults. A healed intestine means a person now has healthy intestinal villi that can properly absorb nutrients from food into the blood.
    Patients enrolled in the study on Celiac disease and mind/body techniques at Rush will be randomly assigned to two course assignments for eight weeks.
    To be eligible for the study, patients must be over 18 years of age, have received a diagnosis of celiac disease in the past four weeks or within two weeks of starting a gluten-free diet, and have not previously attempted a gluten-free diet.
    Source: ScienceDaily (Jan. 11, 2010)


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 10/18/2011 - Once again, Halloween is around the corner and that means parents of children who must avoid gluten are wondering which candies, especially seasonal and Halloween candies, are safe for kids on a gluten–free diet?
    As awareness of celiac disease and gluten–free diets grows, more parents are demanding gluten–free products, and more manufacturers are responding with gluten–free products.
    Also, more candy makers are clearly marking their candies as gluten–free or containing wheat, gluten, etc. This gives parents and trick–or–treaters a wider range of choices.
    This makes it easier for parents to find gluten–free candies from reliable makers as close as the corner grocery store.
    But, with such a vast array of treats on parade for Halloween night, it can be a challenge to know which ones are safe.
    Below, we feature an updated list of gluten–friendly and gluten–free candies currently available.
    Below that we feature a list of unsafe, NON–gluten–free candies, as well as a partial list of manufacturers with links to their company websites.
    Remember, the list is just a guideline, and should not taken as authoritative or comprehensive. Before consuming any candy on the list, be sure to gauge your purchases according to your own sensitivity levels, or those of your children.

    Gluten–Free  and Gluten-Safe Halloween Candy and Treats

    3 Musketeers fun size
    3 Musketeers Mint with dark chocolate
    A
    Act II Popcorn Balls
    Albert’s Gummy Eyeballs
    Albert’s Iced Halloween pops (lollipops)
    Almond Joy fun size bars
    Amanda's Own Confections Chocolate shapes and chocolate lollipops
    Annie's Organic Bunny Fruit snacks
    Applehead, Grapehead, Cherryhead
    B
    Baby Ruth original and fun size
    Barrels of Candy
    Bazooka Big Mix (includes bubble gum, bubble gum filled candy, candy chews, and bubble gum filled lollipops)
    Betty Crocker Fruit by the Foot Wicked Webs Berry Wave mini feet
    Betty Crocker Halloween fruit flavored snacks, including Fruit Gushers, Fruit Roll–ups, and Mini Rolls
    Bit•O•Honey
    Butterfinger original and fun size
    Big Blow bubblegum
    Black Forest Gummy Tarantulas
    Black Forest Gummy Fun Bugs Juicy Oozers
    Bubbly lollipop and gum
    C
    Candy Checkers (made for Target)
    Caramel Apple Pops (made by Tootsie Roll)
    Charleston Chew original and fun size
    Charms Blow Pops and Blow Pop Minis – may contain milk or soy
    Charms Candy Carnival Package  – Blow Pops, Sugar Babies, Zip a Dee mini pops, Sugar Daddy, Pops, Sugar Mama Caramel, Tear Jerkers sour bubble gum, Blow Pop Bubble Gum – may contain milk or soy
    Charms Fluffy Stuff Spider Web cotton candy
    Chewy Atomic Fireballs
    Chewy Lemonheads and Friends
    Child’s Play
    Colombina Scary Eyeballs bubblegum
    Colombina Fizzy Pops
    Comix Mix Candy Sticks – Tom and Jerry, Flintstones, Scooby
    Doo, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, Popeye
    Cracker Jack caramel coated popcorn and peanuts
    D
    Disney Halloween Candy Mix – jelly beans, gummies, candy bracelets and characters from Cars, Tinkerbell and Toy Story
    Dove pieces – Dark Chocolate, Milk Chocolate, Peanut Butter Milk Chocolate, Caramel Milk Chocolate
    Dots Gumdrops – including Candy Corn Dots, Ghost Dots, and Bat Dots
    Dubble Bubble bubblegum – may include milk or soy
    Dum Dum Lollipops (including Shrek Pops) –  no peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, wheat or gluten. Manufactured on dedicated equipment.
    Dum Dum Chewy Pops –  no peanuts, tree nuts, milk, eggs, wheat or gluten. Manufactured on dedicated equipment.
    F
    Farley’s Kiddie Mix - Smarties, SweetTarts, Now and Later, Jaw Breakers, Super Bubble and Lolli-pops
    Ferrara Pan Caramels - may contain milk or soy. Distributed in a facility where peanuts and tree nuts are used to make other products
    Ferrara Pan Lemonhead & Friends candy mix – including Applehead, Cherryhead, Grapehead, Chewy Lemonhead & Friends, Chewy Atomic Fireball, and Red Hots
    Florida’s Natural Healthy Treats Nuggets, Sour String, Fruit Stiks
    Fright Fingers Popcorn Kit
    Frankford’s Bugs Gummy Candy* – reported issues
    Frankford’s Gummy Body Parts* – reported issues
    Frankford’s Marshmallow Pals* – reported issues
    Fun Dip
    Fun Dip Sour
    G
    Game Night boxes of candy game pieces (includes Operation, Sorry!, Monopoly, Life, and Clue)
    Grave Gummies (Yummy Gummies)
    Gummy Pirate Choppers
    H
    Heath milk chocolate English toffee bar and snack size - does contain almonds
    Hershey’s Bliss (Milk Chocolate, Milk Chocolate with Almonds, Milk Chocolate with Meltaway Center, White Chocolate with Meltaway Center, Milk Chocolate with Raspberry Meltaway Center, Dark Chocolate)
    Hershey’s Kisses (Candy Corn flavored candy, Caramel, Caramel Apple flavored filling, Milk Chocolate, Chocolate Meltaway, Pumpkin Spice, Hugs, Hugs & Kisses, Cherry Cordial Creme, Milk Chocolate with Almonds, Special Dark)
    Hershey’s Milk Chocolate bars and snack-size bars
    Hershey’s Milk Chocolate with Almonds snack-size bars
    Hot Tamales
    Humphrey Popcorn Balls
    J
    Jelly Belly beans – gluten–free, dairy–free
    Jolly Rancher hard candy and Doubles Candy
    Jolly Rancher Hard Candy Stix, Lollipops and Fruit Chews
    Jr. Mints fun size – may contain eggs
    Jujifruits
    Just Born marshmallow treats
    K
    Kellogg’s Spongebob Squarepants fruit flavored snacks
    Kraft Jet–Puffed Boo Mallows marshmallows
    L
    Lemonheads
    LifeSavers Gummies including Big Ring Gummies, Sweet ‘n’ Sour, and Scary Assortment
    M
    M&M’s – original, peanut, peanut butter
    Mars M&M's – except pretzel M&M's
    Mars Dove chocolate products
    Mars Munch Nut bar
    Mars Snickers, Snickers Dark bars, fun size and mini’s – may contain almonds
    Mallo Cup
    Marvel Heroes Candy Sticks (Hulk, Spiderman, Wolverine)
    Melster Peanut Butter Kisses
    Milk Duds
    Mike and Ike
    Mini Mentos
    Mini Sour Dudes Straws
    Monstaz Pops (jack–o–lantern lollipops)
    Monster Hunt plastic monster eggs filled with candy bones, skulls and pumpkins (made for Target)
    Mounds dark chocolate fun size bars –  made on equipment that processes almonds, in a facility that processes peanuts
    Mr. Goodbar – does contain peanuts
    N
    Necco’s Sky Bar 4 in 1 chocolate bar
    Necco Wafers
    Necco Mary Janes
    Necco Mary Jane Peanut Butter Kisses – does contain peanuts
    Necco Sweethearts Conversation Hearts (available for Valentine's Day only)
    Necco Canada Mint & Wintergreen Lozenges
    Necco Haviland Thin Mints and Candy Stix
    Necco Clark Bars
    Necco Skybars
    Necco Haviland Peppermint & Wintergreen Patties
    Necco Candy Eggs
    Necco Talking Pumpkins (available at Halloween only)
    Necco Squirrel Nut Caramels and Squirrel Nut Zippers
    Necco Banana Split and Mint Julep Chews
    Necco Ultramints
    Nestle Milk Chocolate fun size bars
    Nestle Baby Ruth
    Nestle Bit–O–Honey
    Nestle Butterfinger (NOT Butterfinger Crisp or Butterfinger Stixx)
    Nestle Goobers – does contain peanuts
    Nestle Nips (both regular and sugar–free)
    Nestle Oh Henry!
    Nestle Raisinets –  made on equipment that processes peanuts
    Nestle Sno–Caps
    Nestle Wonka Pixy Stix
    Nestle Wonka Laffy Taffy
    Nestle Wonka Lik–M–Aid Fun Dip
    Nestle Wonka Spree
    Nik-L-Nip wax bottles with juice
    Now and Later
    O
    Operation Gummy Candy
    P
    Palmer Peanut Butter Cups – does contain peanuts
    Pay Day peanut caramel bar snack size
    Peanut M&M’s
    Pearson’s Bun candy –  maple and roasted peanuts
    Pearson’s Mint Patties,
    Pearson’s Nut Goodies
    Pearson's Salted Nut Rolls
    Peeps Jack–o–lanterns, Ghosts and Chocolate Mousse Cats – “Gluten Free”
    Pez candy – “Gluten Free”
    Pop Rocks
    Pixie Stix
    R
    Rain Blo Bubble Gum Eyes of Terror
    Raisinets
    Razzles candy gum
    Red Hots
    Reese’s Fast Break candy bars and snack size
    Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups snack size and miniatures
    Reese’s Peanut Butter Pumpkins
    Reese’s Pieces
    Reese’s Select Peanut Butter Cremes
    Reese’s Select Clusters
    Reese’s Whipps
    Rolo chocolate covered caramels
    S
    Sixlets
    Skeleton Pops (lollipops)
    Skittles includes Original, Sour, Wild Berry, Fizzl’d Fruits, and Crazy Core, including fun-size
    Smarties – the small pastel–colored candies sold in rolls, not Nestle’s chocolate version) – “Contains NO: gluten, milk, egg, fish, crustacean shellfish, tree nuts, wheat, peanuts, or soy.
    Snickers
    Snickers Fudge bar
    Sour Patch
    Starburst Fruit Chews and fun-size
    Starburst Gummibursts and Sour Gummibursts – “Gluten Free”
    Sugar Babies
    Sugar Daddy Caramel Pops
    Super Bubble bubble gum
    Swedish Fish
    Sweethearts conversation hearts Forbidden Fruits (candy packaging of The Twilight Saga, New Moon the movie)
    Sweet’s Candy Corn Taffy
    T
    Tootsie Pops – original and mini
    Tootsie Rolls Midgies and snack bars
    Transformers Canpeasron's salted nut rolldy Mix – gummy shields, fruit chews, candy shields, gum rocks
    W
    Warheads – Extreme Sour hard candy and Sour QBZ chewy cubes
    Wonka Bottlecaps
    Wonka Chocolate Laffy Taffy
    Wonka Giant Chewy Nerds Jelly Beans
    Wonka Giant Pixy Stix
    Wonka Gobstopper Everlasting
    Wonka Gobstopper Chewy
    Wonka Laffy Taffy Ropes
    Wonka Mix–Ups
    Wonka Monster Mix–Ups – SweetTarts Skulls and Bones, Spooky Nerds, Howlin’ Laffy Taffy
    Wonka Nerds – carry a cross contamination warning on the Spooky Nerds orange and fruit punch flavors
    Wonka Pixy Stix
    Wonka Runts
    Wonka Runts Chewy
    Wonka SweetTarts
    Wonka Sweetarts (regular)
    Wonka Sweetarts Chew
    Wonka Sweetarts Giant Chewy
    Wonka Sweetarts Mini Chew
    Wonka Sweetarts Chewy Twists
    Wonka Sweetarts Shockers
    Wonka Tart N Tinys,
    Wonka Tart N Tinys Chew
    Wonka SweetTarts Boo Bag Mix – SweetTart Chews OK, but other packages had a cross–contamination warning!
    X
    X–scream Mouth Morphers Fruit Gushers
    Y
    York Peppermint Patties Pumpkins
    Z
    Zed Candy Skulls and Bones
    With all these selections, finding some good, gluten–free candy should be a snap. As always, be sure to read labels, as some ingredients can vary.

    **WARNING! THESE UNSAFE CANDIES CONTAIN GLUTEN:
    AIRHEADS
    Airheads Xtremes Rolls contains wheat flourANNABELLE’S
    Rocky Road – contains barley malt and wheat flour
    BRACH'S
    All Brach's candy should be considered NOT gluten–free
    HERSHEY
    Kit Kat – contains wheat
    Reese's Minis
    Twizzlers – contains wheat
    Whoppers –  contains barley malt and wheat flour
    MARS and WRIGLEY
    Milky Way –  contains barley malt
    Twix –  contains wheat
    NESTLE
    Butterfinger Crisp or Butterfinger Stixx  –  contains wheat flour
    Crunch –  contains barley malt, “made on equipment that also processes wheat.”
    Hundred Grand Bar –  contains barley malt, “made on equipment that also processes wheat.”
    Wonka Oompas and the Wonka Bar are NOT gluten–free.
    RUSSELL STOVER'S  – Products have been produced on shared equipment with peanuts, tree nuts, eggs and wheat.
    WONKA
    Sweetarts Gummy Bugs –  contains wheat/gluten
    Sweetarts Rope –  contains wheat/gluten
    Oompas
    Wonka Bar
    A more comprehensive list of unsafe candies for Halloween can be found at celiacfamily.com.
    Here is a partial list of major candy manufacturers and how to contact them:
    Hershey's – 800–468–1714
    Jelly Belly – 800–522–3267
    Just Born – 888–645–3453
    Mars Chocolate – 800–627–7852
    Necco – 781–485–4800
    Nestle USA – 800–225–2270
    Pearson's – 800–328–6507
    Tootsie Roll – 773–838–3400
    Other resources:
    About.com
    DivineCaroline.com
    Surefoodliving.com


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/27/2015 - Gluten-free beer drinkers rejoice! The first completely dedicated gluten-free brewery in the UK will open in Scotland in 2015.
    Edinburgh-based Bellfield Brewery was founded by a group of friends, two of whom have celiac disease, and will be dedicated to the creation of naturally gluten-free beers.
    Even though there are a number of naturally gluten-free, and some gluten-removed beers, already on the market, the news will doubtless put smiles on the faces of beer-loving celiacs and people with gluten-sensitivity, who must avoid traditionally produced beers to remain healthy.
    Bellfield Brewery plans to widen the range of available gluten-free beers by producing a premium IPA, and eventually, a stout, lager, with other beers to follow.
    To accomplish their goal, Bellfield’s owners are currently working with a number of master brewers in Scotland to develop new gluten-free recipes. Bellfield will debut its first products by summer 2015. 
    What do you think? Do we need more and better gluten-free beers? Are you game for a gluten-free IPA?

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/31/2015 - Here is Celiac.com's list of Gluten-free and Gluten-safe Candy for Easter 2015.
    Below the list of SAFE candy, you will find a list of UNSAFE, NON–gluten–free candies, along with a partial list of major candy makers with links to their company websites.
    Please keep in mind that this list is not complete, or definitive, and should only be used as a guideline.
    Before eating any candy on the list, be sure to read labels, check manufacturer’s information, and gauge your purchases according to your own sensitivity levels, or those of your children.
    Check manufacturer websites for official information on any specific products.
    For a comprehensive list of gluten-free candy and manufacturers, see Celiac.com’s Gluten-free and Gluten-safe Halloween Candy.
     
    A
    Almond Joy Eggs Andes Creme de Menthe Thins B
    Baby Ruth original and fun size Bazooka Big Mix (contains bubble gum, bubble gum filled candy, candy chews, and bubble gum filled lollipops) Bazooka Ring Pops Bazooka Push Pops Bazooka Baby Bottle Pops Bit•O•Honey Big Blow bubblegum Bubbly lollipop and gum Butterfinger bar, original and fun size C
    Cadbury Caramel Eggs Cadbury Caramello Bunnies Cadbury Creme Eggs Cadbury Dairy Milk Chocolate Bunny Cadbury Dairy Milk Buttons Chicks Cadbury Easter Egg Trail Pack Cadbury Egg Heads Cadbury hollow milk chocolate egg filled with Cadbury mini-eggs Cadbury Mini Caramel Eggs Cadbury Mini Chocolate Eggs Cadbury Mini Crème Eggs Cadbury Mini Daim Eggs Cadbury Mini Eggs Cadbury Orange Creme Eggs Carousel Bubble Gum Eggs Carousel Easter Egg Surprise Lollipops Charms Blow Pops and Blow Pop Minis Cry Baby Eggs D
    Dairy Good Easter bunnies (chocolate flavored, foil-wrapped) Dairy Good Easter eggs (chocolate eggs) Dairy Good Chocolate and White Chocolate Crosses Disney Princess plastic eggs with candy and stickers inside Dove Chocolates Dove Chocolate Eggs Dove Fairy Bunny hollow milk chocolate Dove Solid Chocolate Bunnies, milk chocolate Ingredients Dove Solid Chocolate Bunnies, dark chocolate Dove Truffle Eggs Dubble Bubble Eggs (egg-shaped bubble gum) and Speckled Bubble Gum E
    Easter Bunny Egg-head family filled with Power Candy F
    Farley’s Kiddie Mix—contains Now & Laters, Jawbreakers, Super Bubble bubble gum, Tootsie Roll Midgees, Sassy Tarts and Smarties Florida Natural Healthy Treats fruit snacks eggs Frankford Marshmallow Chicks and Bunnies G
    Gimbal’s candies H
    Haribo Gold-Bears Heath milk chocolate English toffee bar and snack size - contains almonds Hershey’s Milk Chocolate Bunnies, Springtime Flowers, and Crosses Hershey’s milk chocolate hollow egg with candy-coated milk chocolate eggs inside Hershey’s candy-coated milk chocolate eggs Hershey’s Solid Milk Chocolate Speedy Bunny and Princess Bunny Hershey’s milk chocolate hollow Bunny Hershey’s milk chocolate eggs Hershey’s Special Dark chocolate eggs Hershey’s Marshmallow Eggs Hershey’s Blisschocolate candy Hershey’s Bliss milk chocolate eggs with a meltaway center Hershey’s Bliss dark chocolate eggs Hershey’s Bliss Hollow Milk Chocolate Bunny Hershey’s Kisses Hershey’s Kisses filled with Caramel Hershey’s Kisses with Almond Hershey's Nuggets (Milk Chocolate, Milk Chocolate with Almonds, Milk Chocolate with Toffee and Almonds, Special Dark, Special Dark with Almonds), Hershey's Skor Toffee Bars Hot Tamales J
    Jelly Beans—Top gluten-free brands include: Jelly Belly Jelly Beans Just Born Jelly Beans Just Born Marshmallow Treats  K
    Kellogg’s Spongebob Squarepants fruit flavored snacks Kinder Surprise Eggs L
    Lemon Delight; Lime Delight; Mystery Flavored Marshmallow Chicks; Orange Delight; Party Cake; Sour Watermelon; and Sweet Lemonade Flavored Marshmallow Chicks
    Lifesaver hard candies—Original and Pastels Lifesaver Eggsortment (including jellybeans, gummies and pops) Lifesaver Gummies—Original, and Bunnies and Eggs M
    Melster Chocolate Flavored Marshmallow Bunnies M&M’s—Original, Peanut, Speck-tacular Eggs, and Bunny Mix M&M’s Easter Pastel Colored Coconut M&M’s Mike and Ike Berry Blast Mike & Ike Jelly Beans Mike and Ike Lemonade Blends Mike and Ike Original Mike and Ike Zours Mounds Eggs N
    Nestle’s Nest Eggs (EXCEPT Crunch Nest Eggs) Nestle’s milk chocolate Nest Eggs Nestle’s creamy caramel Nest Eggs Nestle’s Butterfinger chocolate Nest Eggs Nestle’s Butterfinger Creme Eggs P
    Palmer Holiday Candy Palmer’s Bunny Bites foil-wrapped eggs—all flavors Palmer’s Baby Binks hollow milk chocolate bunny Palmer’s Bunnyettes (milk chocolate) Palmer’s Butter Cream Flavored eggs Palmer’s Carrot Patch Pete Palmer’s Fudge Filled Big Ears Palmer’s Hollow Bunnies Palmer’s Little Beauty milk chocolate bunny Palmer’s Milk Chocolate Flavored and premium milk chocolate eggs Palmer’s Peanut Butter Filled chocolate eggs Palmer Poppin’ Rockin’ Egg (hollow egg filled with Pop Rocks) Palmer’s Soft Caramel Cups Palmer’s Super Sports Balls Peeps Chocolate Dipped Marshmallow Chicks Peeps Chocolate Mousse Flavored Marshmallow Chicks Peeps Chocolate Covered Marshmallow Chicks Peeps Chocolate Mousse Flavored Marshmallow Bunnies Peeps Decorated Marshmallow Eggs Peeps Large Marshmallow Bunny Peeps Marshmallow Bunnies—Yellow, lavender, pink, orange, green, blue, and white Peeps Mystery Flavored Marshmallow Bunnies Peeps Original Marshmallow Chicks—Yellow, white, orange, green, pink, blue, and lavender Peeps Flavored Chicks, including:Blue Raspberry; Bubble Gum; Peeps milk chocolate covered marshmallow PEZ candy Pixy Stix Green Grass (Wonka) Giant Pixy Stix (Wonka) Pop Rocks in plastic egg PLASTIC EGGS WITH ASSORTED CANDY
    Bee Flowers and Fairies Egg Hunt (contains Smarties, Super Bubble bubble gum, Taffy Werks, Jelly Bean Werks, and Lemonheads) Bee Sport Ball Eggs (contains Smarties, Super Bubble bubble gum, Taffy Werks, Jelly Bean Werks, and Lemonheads) Bee Noah’s Ark Easter Egg Hunt (contains Smarties, Super Bubble bubble gum, Taffy Werks, Jelly Bean Werks, and Lemonheads) Bug Collector Candy Filled Egg Hunt (contains Ferrara Pan jellybeans, Tropical Chewy Lemonhead and Friends, Chewy Lemonhead and Friends, Jaw Busters) Peace and Love Egg Hunt (contains Ferrara Pan jellybeans, Red Hots, Tropical Chewy Lemonhead and Friends, Chewy Lemonhead and Friends, Jaw Busters) Dress Up Candy Filled Egg Hunt (contains Ferrara Pan jellybeans, Tropical Chewy Lemonhead and Friends, Chewy Lemonhead and Friends, Jaw Busters) Farm Friends Candy Filled Egg Hunt (contains Ferrara Pan jellybeans, Tropical Chewy Lemonhead and Friends, Chewy Lemonhead and Friends, Jaw Busters) Game Time Candy Filled Egg Hunt (contains Ferrara Pan jellybeans, Tropical Chewy Lemonhead and Friends, Chewy Lemonhead and Friends, Jaw Busters) Glow in the Dark Egg Hunt (contains Ferrara Pan jellybeans, Red Hots, Tropical Chewy Lemonhead and Friends, Chewy Lemonhead and Friends, Jaw Busters) Mmmm…Cupcakes Egg Hunt (contains Ferrara Pan jellybeans, Red Hots, Tropical Chewy Lemonhead and Friends, Chewy Lemonhead and Friends, Jaw Busters) Nighttime Candy Filled Egg Hunt (contains Ferrara Pan jellybeans, Tropical Chewy Lemonhead and Friends, Chewy Lemonhead and Friends, Jaw Busters) Outdoor Adventure Candy Filled Egg Hunt (contains Ferrara Pan jellybeans, Tropical Chewy Lemonhead and Friends, Chewy Lemonhead and Friends, Jaw Busters) Pet Shop Candy Filled Egg Hunt (contains Ferrara Pan jellybeans, Tropical Chewy Lemonhead and Friends, Chewy Lemonhead and Friends, Jaw Busters) Rainforest Candy Filled Egg Hunt (contains Ferrara Pan jellybeans, Tropical Chewy Lemonhead and Friends, Chewy Lemonhead and Friends, Jaw Busters) Speedster Cars Candy Filled Egg Hunt (contains Ferrara Pan jellybeans, Tropical Chewy Lemonhead and Friends, Chewy Lemonhead and Friends, Jaw Busters) R
    Reese’s Peanut ButterChocolate candy Reese’s Easter Assortment Eggs (including peanut butter eggs, white peanut butter eggs, and miniatures)—EXCEPT the foil-wrapped mini eggs, which contain gluten Reese’s Peanut Butter Cup miniatures Reese’s Pieces Pastel Eggs Reese’s Peanut Butter Eggs—large and small size, EXCEPT the foil-wrapped mini eggs, which contain gluten Reese’s Reester Bunny—large size only! Mini-sized unsafe Ring pops Russel Stover Pectin Jelly Beans  S
    See’s Candies—See’s candies do not contain gluten Sixlets Skittles eggs and fun-size Smarties candy rolls Snickers mini’s Sour Patch Bunnies Spree Jelly Beans—Cherry, Lemon and Green Apple Surf Sweets Jelly Beans Starburst fruit chews—All Original and Easter-themed Starburst candy, including jelly beans and special Easter candy packages Starburst Jellybeans—original, tropical, and red fruits Swedish Fish Eggs soft and chewy candy Sunny Seed Drops chocolate covered sunflower seeds T
    Teenee Beanee Jelly Beans—including Americana Medley, Country Retreat, and Island Breeze flavored packages Easter-themed Tootsie Roll candy, including Dubble Bubble Easter egg-shaped bubble gum, Tootsie Pops, Charms Blow Pops and Charms Candy Carnival products W
    Wonka Giant Chewy Nerds Jelly Beans Wonka Everlasting Gobstopper Eggbreakers Wonka Fun Dip Wonka Giant Pixy Stix Wonka Hoppin’ Nerds Wonka Runts Freckled Eggs Wonka Egg Hunt with a Golden Egg (contains Nerds, Laffy Taffy, and SweeTarts) Wonka Egg Hunt Zero Gravity (contains Nerds, Laffy Taffy, and SweeTarts) Wonka Egg Hunt Hard 2 Find (contains Nerds, Runts, and SweeTarts) Y
    York Peppermint Patties Z
    Zachary real chocolate Marshmallow Eggs Zachary solid milk chocolate Bunnies Zipperz Lollipops WARNING! THESE UNSAFE CANDIES CONTAIN OR MAY CONTAIN GLUTEN:
    A
    AIRHEADS
    Airheads Candies are “Manufactured in a facility that processes wheat flour.” Airheads Xtremes Rolls contains wheat flour ANNABELLE’S
    Abba Zabba—Contains: peanuts, soybean oil and soy lecithin, wheat/gluten Big Hunk—Made in a facility that uses peanuts, tree nuts and wheat Look—Contains wheat/gluten Rocky Road, Rocky Road Mint, Rocky Road Dark—Contain wheat/gluten U-No—Contains wheat/gluten AMERICAN LICORICE CO.
    Sour Punch Sticks, Twists, Bits, Bites, Straws—Contains wheat/gluten Red Vines—all varieties contain wheat/gluten, including Black, Natural and Fruit Vines B
    BRACH'S
    All Brach's candy should be considered NOT gluten–free! Please be careful, as I have seen Brach's candies included on gluten-free safe lists! C
    Child’s Play Easter Mix—Made in a facility that uses peanuts, tree nuts and wheat Chick Feed sunflower seeds “May contain wheat, peanuts, and tree nuts.” F
    Ferrero Rocher candy—Contains wheat/gluten Frankford Cookies and Creme Eggs—Contains wheat/gluten Frankford Crispy Eggs (milk chocolate flavored)—Contains wheat/gluten, and made in a facility that uses peanuts and wheat. Frankford solid milk chocolate bunny—Made in a facility that uses peanuts and wheat H
    HARIBO
    Black Licorice Wheels Brixx Fruity Pasta Konfekt and Pontefract Cakes Red Licorice Wheels Sour S’ghetti HERSHEY
    Hershey’s miniatures—Label states: “May contain wheat.” Hershey’s Cookies ‘n’ Creme egg—Contains wheat/gluten Hershey’s Bliss (Milk Chocolate, Milk Chocolate with Almonds, Milk Chocolate with Meltaway Center, White Chocolate with Meltaway Center, Milk Chocolate with Raspberry Meltaway Center, Dark Chocolate) – No gluten ingredients, but not on Hershey’s official gluten-free list Hershey's Good & Plenty Hershey’s Mr. Goodbar fun size K
    Kit Kat Bunny Ears and Kit Kat minis—Contains wheat/gluten L
    Lindt Chocolate — Lindt US website states that they “cannot guarantee that Lindt chocolate is gluten free.” M
    Mayfair Kid’s Play basket stuffers (including Fuit Chews, Teaberry Gumballs, Spout Bubble Log, Atomic Fireballs, Super Bubble bubble gum, Easter Pops, Jawbreakers, Airheads, Lemonhead, and Smarties—Made in a facility that uses peanuts, tree nuts and wheat Mighty Malts Speckled Malted Milk Eggs —Contains wheat/gluten Milky Way minis—Contains wheat/gluten Milky Way Bunnies—Contains wheat/gluten N
    NESTLE
    Butterfinger Crisp or Butterfinger Stixx—Contain wheat/gluten Crunch—Contains wheat/gluten Nestle Butterfinger Egg with pieces in chocolate—Contains wheat/gluten Nestle Crunch Nest Eggs—Contains wheat/gluten Hundred Grand Bar—Contains wheat/gluten P
    PAAS eggs—Contains wheat/gluten Palmer’s Double Crisp chocolate candy (including Bunnies, Bunnyettes, Pops, Chick a Dees, Bunny Munny and Eggs)—Contain wheat/gluten Palmer’s Lil’ Crispy chocolate bunny—Contains wheat/gluten Palmer’s My Little Bunny—Contains wheat/gluten Palmer’s Cookies ‘n Creme Eggs—Contains wheat/gluten Palmer’s Crispy Peanut Butter flavored eggs—Contains wheat/gluten Palmer’s Eggbert Double Crisp—Contains wheat/gluten Palmer’s Quax hollow milk flavored candy duck (“The Yummy Ducky”) Peter Rabbit real milk chocolate bunny—Made in a facility that uses peanuts, tree nuts and wheat Peter Rabbit hollow milk chocolate bunny—Made in a facility that uses peanuts, tree nuts and wheat R
    Reese’s milk chocolate and peanut butter eggs (mini eggs foil-wrapped individually)—Contains wheat/gluten Reese’s mini-Reester Bunnies—Contains wheat/gluten Russell Stover chocolate candy—Made in a facility that uses peanuts, tree nuts and wheat S
    Snickers Eggs—Label states: May contain tree nuts, egg, and wheat. Snickers Creme Sports Eggs—Label states: May contain tree nuts, egg, and wheat. SpongeBob Squarepants Eggs plastic egg with sour candy and stickers—Made in a facility that uses peanuts, tree nuts and wheat SpongeBob Squarepants gummy Krabby Patties—Made in a facility that processes peanuts, tree nuts and wheat SweetTart Gummy Bunnies (Wonka)—Contains wheat/gluten T
    Trolli Gummi Bunnies—Made in a facility that processes peanuts, tree nuts and wheat Twix—Contains wheat/gluten Twizzlerscandy—Contains wheat/gluten Twizzlers Tweeters—Contains wheat/gluten Twizzlers Rainbow Twists—Contains wheat/gluten Twizzlers Strawberry Mini Bars—Contains wheat/gluten Twizted Strawberry Blast pull-n-peel candy—Contains wheat/gluten W
    Whitman’s Sampler—Made in a facility that processes peanuts, tree nuts and wheat Whoppers Robin Eggs, including mini-Robbin Eggs—Contains wheat/gluten Wonka’s Eggs—Made in a facility that processes peanuts, tree nuts and wheat Wonka Easter Nerds Rope—Made in a facility that processes peanuts, tree nuts and wheat Wonka Mix-Ups (including SweeTart chews, Laffy Taffy, SweeTarts, and Nerds)—Made in a facility that processes peanuts, tree nuts and wheat Wonka Oompas and the Wonka Bar are NOT gluten–free. CANDY MANUFACTURERS
    Here is a partial list of major candy manufacturers and how to contact them:
    Adams & Brooks – 213-749-3226 American Licorice Co. – 866-442-2783 BEE International – 619-710-1800 Ferrara Candy Company – 888-247-9855 Ferrero Rocher – 732-764-9300 FLIX – 847-647-1370 Gimbal’s Fine Candies – 888-841-9373 Goetze’s Candy Company – 410-342-2010 Hershey's – 800–468–1714. Here's a link to Hershey's official gluten-free list. Impact Confections – 303-626-2222 Jelly Belly – 800–522–3267 Just Born – 888–645–3453. Here's a link to Just Born Gluten-free FAQs Kraft Foods – 877-535-5666 Mars Chocolate – 800–627–7852 Necco – 781–485–4800 Nestle USA – 800–225–2270 Palmer – 610 372-8971 Pearson's – 800–328–6507 PEZ – 203.795.0531 Pop Rocks – 770-399-1776 Tootsie Roll – 773–838–3400 Additional information and lists of gluten-free safe and unsafe candies can be found at:
    About.com Celiaccentral.com Celiacfamily.com DivineCaroline.com Surefoodliving.com Foodallergyfeast Medpedia Glutenfreefacts

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/18/2018 - Celiac disease has been mainly associated with Caucasian populations in Northern Europe, and their descendants in other countries, but new scientific evidence is beginning to challenge that view. Still, the exact global prevalence of celiac disease remains unknown.  To get better data on that issue, a team of researchers recently conducted a comprehensive review and meta-analysis to get a reasonably accurate estimate the global prevalence of celiac disease. 
    The research team included P Singh, A Arora, TA Strand, DA Leffler, C Catassi, PH Green, CP Kelly, V Ahuja, and GK Makharia. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi, India; Innlandet Hospital Trust, Lillehammer, Norway; Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Gastroenterology Research and Development, Takeda Pharmaceuticals Inc, Cambridge, MA; Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; USA Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; and the Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.
    For their review, the team searched Medline, PubMed, and EMBASE for the keywords ‘celiac disease,’ ‘celiac,’ ‘tissue transglutaminase antibody,’ ‘anti-endomysium antibody,’ ‘endomysial antibody,’ and ‘prevalence’ for studies published from January 1991 through March 2016. 
    The team cross-referenced each article with the words ‘Asia,’ ‘Europe,’ ‘Africa,’ ‘South America,’ ‘North America,’ and ‘Australia.’ They defined celiac diagnosis based on European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines. The team used 96 articles of 3,843 articles in their final analysis.
    Overall global prevalence of celiac disease was 1.4% in 275,818 individuals, based on positive blood tests for anti-tissue transglutaminase and/or anti-endomysial antibodies. The pooled global prevalence of biopsy-confirmed celiac disease was 0.7% in 138,792 individuals. That means that numerous people with celiac disease potentially remain undiagnosed.
    Rates of celiac disease were 0.4% in South America, 0.5% in Africa and North America, 0.6% in Asia, and 0.8% in Europe and Oceania; the prevalence was 0.6% in female vs 0.4% males. Celiac disease was significantly more common in children than adults.
    This systematic review and meta-analysis showed celiac disease to be reported worldwide. Blood test data shows celiac disease rate of 1.4%, while biopsy data shows 0.7%. The prevalence of celiac disease varies with sex, age, and location. 
    This review demonstrates a need for more comprehensive population-based studies of celiac disease in numerous countries.  The 1.4% rate indicates that there are 91.2 million people worldwide with celiac disease, and 3.9 million are in the U.S.A.
    Source:
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/16/2018 - Summer is the time for chips and salsa. This fresh salsa recipe relies on cabbage, yes, cabbage, as a secret ingredient. The cabbage brings a delicious flavor and helps the salsa hold together nicely for scooping with your favorite chips. The result is a fresh, tasty salsa that goes great with guacamole.
    Ingredients:
    3 cups ripe fresh tomatoes, diced 1 cup shredded green cabbage ½ cup diced yellow onion ¼ cup chopped fresh cilantro 1 jalapeno, seeded 1 Serrano pepper, seeded 2 tablespoons lemon juice 2 tablespoons red wine vinegar 2 garlic cloves, minced salt to taste black pepper, to taste Directions:
    Purée all ingredients together in a blender.
    Cover and refrigerate for at least 1 hour. 
    Adjust seasoning with salt and pepper, as desired. 
    Serve is a bowl with tortilla chips and guacamole.

    Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.
    Celiac.com 06/15/2018 - There seems to be widespread agreement in the published medical research reports that stuttering is driven by abnormalities in the brain. Sometimes these are the result of brain injuries resulting from a stroke. Other types of brain injuries can also result in stuttering. Patients with Parkinson’s disease who were treated with stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus, an area of the brain that regulates some motor functions, experienced a return or worsening of stuttering that improved when the stimulation was turned off (1). Similarly, stroke has also been reported in association with acquired stuttering (2). While there are some reports of psychological mechanisms underlying stuttering, a majority of reports seem to favor altered brain morphology and/or function as the root of stuttering (3). Reports of structural differences between the brain hemispheres that are absent in those who do not stutter are also common (4). About 5% of children stutter, beginning sometime around age 3, during the phase of speech acquisition. However, about 75% of these cases resolve without intervention, before reaching their teens (5). Some cases of aphasia, a loss of speech production or understanding, have been reported in association with damage or changes to one or more of the language centers of the brain (6). Stuttering may sometimes arise from changes or damage to these same language centers (7). Thus, many stutterers have abnormalities in the same regions of the brain similar to those seen in aphasia.
    So how, you may ask, is all this related to gluten? As a starting point, one report from the medical literature identifies a patient who developed aphasia after admission for severe diarrhea. By the time celiac disease was diagnosed, he had completely lost his faculty of speech. However, his speech and normal bowel function gradually returned after beginning a gluten free diet (8). This finding was so controversial at the time of publication (1988) that the authors chose to remain anonymous. Nonetheless, it is a valuable clue that suggests gluten as a factor in compromised speech production. At about the same time (late 1980’s) reports of connections between untreated celiac disease and seizures/epilepsy were emerging in the medical literature (9).
    With the advent of the Internet a whole new field of anecdotal information was emerging, connecting a variety of neurological symptoms to celiac disease. While many medical practitioners and researchers were casting aspersions on these assertions, a select few chose to explore such claims using scientific research designs and methods. While connections between stuttering and gluten consumption seem to have been overlooked by the medical research community, there is a rich literature on the Internet that cries out for more structured investigation of this connection. Conversely, perhaps a publication bias of the peer review process excludes work that explores this connection.
    Whatever the reason that stuttering has not been reported in the medical literature in association with gluten ingestion, a number of personal disclosures and comments suggesting a connection between gluten and stuttering can be found on the Internet. Abid Hussain, in an article about food allergy and stuttering said: “The most common food allergy prevalent in stutterers is that of gluten which has been found to aggravate the stutter” (10). Similarly, Craig Forsythe posted an article that includes five cases of self-reporting individuals who believe that their stuttering is or was connected to gluten, one of whom also experiences stuttering from foods containing yeast (11). The same site contains one report of a stutterer who has had no relief despite following a gluten free diet for 20 years (11). Another stutterer, Jay88, reports the complete disappearance of her/his stammer on a gluten free diet (12). Doubtless there are many more such anecdotes to be found on the Internet* but we have to question them, exercising more skepticism than we might when reading similar claims in a peer reviewed scientific or medical journal.
    There are many reports in such journals connecting brain and neurological ailments with gluten, so it is not much of a stretch, on that basis alone, to suspect that stuttering may be a symptom of the gluten syndrome. Rodney Ford has even characterized celiac disease as an ailment that may begin through gluten-induced neurological damage (13) and Marios Hadjivassiliou and his group of neurologists and neurological investigators have devoted considerable time and effort to research that reveals gluten as an important factor in a majority of neurological diseases of unknown origin (14) which, as I have pointed out previously, includes most neurological ailments.
    My own experience with stuttering is limited. I stuttered as a child when I became nervous, upset, or self-conscious. Although I have been gluten free for many years, I haven’t noticed any impact on my inclination to stutter when upset. I don’t know if they are related, but I have also had challenges with speaking when distressed and I have noticed a substantial improvement in this area since removing gluten from my diet. Nonetheless, I have long wondered if there is a connection between gluten consumption and stuttering. Having done the research for this article, I would now encourage stutterers to try a gluten free diet for six months to see if it will reduce or eliminate their stutter. Meanwhile, I hope that some investigator out there will research this matter, publish her findings, and start the ball rolling toward getting some definitive answers to this question.
    Sources:
    1. Toft M, Dietrichs E. Aggravated stuttering following subthalamic deep brain stimulation in Parkinson’s disease--two cases. BMC Neurol. 2011 Apr 8;11:44.
    2. Tani T, Sakai Y. Stuttering after right cerebellar infarction: a case study. J Fluency Disord. 2010 Jun;35(2):141-5. Epub 2010 Mar 15.
    3. Lundgren K, Helm-Estabrooks N, Klein R. Stuttering Following Acquired Brain Damage: A Review of the Literature. J Neurolinguistics. 2010 Sep 1;23(5):447-454.
    4. Jäncke L, Hänggi J, Steinmetz H. Morphological brain differences between adult stutterers and non-stutterers. BMC Neurol. 2004 Dec 10;4(1):23.
    5. Kell CA, Neumann K, von Kriegstein K, Posenenske C, von Gudenberg AW, Euler H, Giraud AL. How the brain repairs stuttering. Brain. 2009 Oct;132(Pt 10):2747-60. Epub 2009 Aug 26.
    6. Galantucci S, Tartaglia MC, Wilson SM, Henry ML, Filippi M, Agosta F, Dronkers NF, Henry RG, Ogar JM, Miller BL, Gorno-Tempini ML. White matter damage in primary progressive aphasias: a diffusion tensor tractography study. Brain. 2011 Jun 11.
    7. Lundgren K, Helm-Estabrooks N, Klein R. Stuttering Following Acquired Brain Damage: A Review of the Literature. J Neurolinguistics. 2010 Sep 1;23(5):447-454.
    8. [No authors listed] Case records of the Massachusetts General Hospital. Weekly clinicopathological exercises. Case 43-1988. A 52-year-old man with persistent watery diarrhea and aphasia. N Engl J Med. 1988 Oct 27;319(17):1139-48
    9. Molteni N, Bardella MT, Baldassarri AR, Bianchi PA. Celiac disease associated with epilepsy and intracranial calcifications: report of two patients. Am J Gastroenterol. 1988 Sep;83(9):992-4.
    10. http://ezinearticles.com/?Food-Allergy-and-Stuttering-Link&id=1235725 
    11. http://www.craig.copperleife.com/health/stuttering_allergies.htm 
    12. https://www.celiac.com/forums/topic/73362-any-help-is-appreciated/
    13. Ford RP. The gluten syndrome: a neurological disease. Med Hypotheses. 2009 Sep;73(3):438-40. Epub 2009 Apr 29.
    14. Hadjivassiliou M, Gibson A, Davies-Jones GA, Lobo AJ, Stephenson TJ, Milford-Ward A. Does cryptic gluten sensitivity play a part in neurological illness? Lancet. 1996 Feb 10;347(8998):369-71.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/14/2018 - Refractory celiac disease type II (RCDII) is a rare complication of celiac disease that has high death rates. To diagnose RCDII, doctors identify a clonal population of phenotypically aberrant intraepithelial lymphocytes (IELs). 
    However, researchers really don’t have much data regarding the frequency and significance of clonal T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements (TCR-GRs) in small bowel (SB) biopsies of patients without RCDII. Such data could provide useful comparison information for patients with RCDII, among other things.
    To that end, a research team recently set out to try to get some information about the frequency and importance of clonal T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements (TCR-GRs) in small bowel (SB) biopsies of patients without RCDII. The research team included Shafinaz Hussein, Tatyana Gindin, Stephen M Lagana, Carolina Arguelles-Grande, Suneeta Krishnareddy, Bachir Alobeid, Suzanne K Lewis, Mahesh M Mansukhani, Peter H R Green, and Govind Bhagat.
    They are variously affiliated with the Department of Pathology and Cell Biology, and the Department of Medicine at the Celiac Disease Center, New York Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center, New York, USA. Their team analyzed results of TCR-GR analyses performed on SB biopsies at our institution over a 3-year period, which were obtained from eight active celiac disease, 172 celiac disease on gluten-free diet, 33 RCDI, and three RCDII patients and 14 patients without celiac disease. 
    Clonal TCR-GRs are not infrequent in cases lacking features of RCDII, while PCPs are frequent in all disease phases. TCR-GR results should be assessed in conjunction with immunophenotypic, histological and clinical findings for appropriate diagnosis and classification of RCD.
    The team divided the TCR-GR patterns into clonal, polyclonal and prominent clonal peaks (PCPs), and correlated these patterns with clinical and pathological features. In all, they detected clonal TCR-GR products in biopsies from 67% of patients with RCDII, 17% of patients with RCDI and 6% of patients with gluten-free diet. They found PCPs in all disease phases, but saw no significant difference in the TCR-GR patterns between the non-RCDII disease categories (p=0.39). 
    They also noted a higher frequency of surface CD3(−) IELs in cases with clonal TCR-GR, but the PCP pattern showed no associations with any clinical or pathological feature. 
    Repeat biopsy showed that the clonal or PCP pattern persisted for up to 2 years with no evidence of RCDII. The study indicates that better understanding of clonal T cell receptor gene rearrangements may help researchers improve refractory celiac diagnosis. 
    Source:
    Journal of Clinical Pathologyhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jclinpath-2018-205023

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/13/2018 - There have been numerous reports that olmesartan, aka Benicar, seems to trigger sprue‐like enteropathy in many patients, but so far, studies have produced mixed results, and there really hasn’t been a rigorous study of the issue. A team of researchers recently set out to assess whether olmesartan is associated with a higher rate of enteropathy compared with other angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs).
    The research team included Y.‐H. Dong; Y. Jin; TN Tsacogianis; M He; PH Hsieh; and JJ Gagne. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Pharmacoepidemiology and Pharmacoeconomics, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School in Boston, MA, USA; the Faculty of Pharmacy, School of Pharmaceutical Science at National Yang‐Ming University in Taipei, Taiwan; and the Department of Hepato‐Gastroenterology, Chi Mei Medical Center in Tainan, Taiwan.
    To get solid data on the issue, the team conducted a cohort study among ARB initiators in 5 US claims databases covering numerous health insurers. They used Cox regression models to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for enteropathy‐related outcomes, including celiac disease, malabsorption, concomitant diagnoses of diarrhea and weight loss, and non‐infectious enteropathy. In all, they found nearly two million eligible patients. 
    They then assessed those patients and compared the results for olmesartan initiators to initiators of other ARBs after propensity score (PS) matching. They found unadjusted incidence rates of 0.82, 1.41, 1.66 and 29.20 per 1,000 person‐years for celiac disease, malabsorption, concomitant diagnoses of diarrhea and weight loss, and non‐infectious enteropathy respectively. 
    After PS matching comparing olmesartan to other ARBs, hazard ratios were 1.21 (95% CI, 1.05‐1.40), 1.00 (95% CI, 0.88‐1.13), 1.22 (95% CI, 1.10‐1.36) and 1.04 (95% CI, 1.01‐1.07) for each outcome. Patients aged 65 years and older showed greater hazard ratios for celiac disease, as did patients receiving treatment for more than 1 year, and patients receiving higher cumulative olmesartan doses.
    This is the first comprehensive multi‐database study to document a higher rate of enteropathy in olmesartan initiators as compared to initiators of other ARBs, though absolute rates were low for both groups.
    Source:
    Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics